Sunday Morning Book Thread 08-14-2016: Leaping Forward [OregonMuse]


The AD White Reading Room at Uris Library - Cornell University.jpg
AD White Reading Room at Uris Library, Cornell University

Click on the pic for a larger version; it should open in a new tab.

No doubt this room was where noted deep thinker Keith Olbermann spent many hours in his formative years, honing those razor-sharp mental faculties that have been such a wonder and a blessing to the national conversation. His mental prowess is such that it has only recently been exceeded by Don Lemon.

Where was i? Oh, yeah...

Good morning to all of you morons and moronettes and bartenders everywhere and all the ships at sea. Welcome to AoSHQ's stately, prestigious, internationally acclaimed and high-class Sunday Morning Book Thread, where men are men, all the 'ettes are gorgeous, safe spaces are underneath your house and are used as protection against actual dangers, like tornados, and snowflakes soon dissolve. And unlike other AoSHQ comment threads, the Sunday Morning Book Thread is so hoity-toity, pants are required. Even if it's these.


158 One of these days I'm going to go into my library with the cherry wood paneled ceiling and custom bookcases, light a fire in the fireplace, sit in one of the wingback chairs, adjust the over-the-shoulder reading light and read a book....

At least that was the plan when I built the house 24 years ago.

Yeah, one of these days.

Posted by: jwest at June 07, 2016 01:50 PM (Zs4uk)

He forgot the brandy snifter and cigar, but other than that, good show.


Nood Chinese Communism

We all know that Mao killed millions in his attempt to remake China in his own image. And now, historians are slowly being granted access to

...hitherto unseen party archives, including: secret reports from the Public Security Bureau; detailed minutes of top party meetings; unexpunged versions of leadership speeches; surveys of working conditions in the countryside; investigations into cases of mass murder; confessions of leaders responsible for the deaths of millions of people; inquiries compiled by special teams sent in to discover the extent of the catastrophe in the last stages of the Great Leap Forward; general reports on peasant resistance during the collectivisation campaign; secret police opinion surveys; letters of complaint written by ordinary people; and much more.


And, what a surprise, it turns out that Mao's Great Leap Forward was

[ ] much better
[ X ] much worse

than previously realized:

What comes out of this massive and detailed dossier is a tale of horror in which Mao emerges as one of the greatest mass murderers in history, responsible for the deaths of at least 45 million people between 1958 and 1962. It is not merely the extent of the catastrophe that dwarfs earlier estimates, but also the manner in which many people died: between two and three million victims were tortured to death or summarily killed, often for the slightest infraction.

This is from historian Frank Dikötter, and his book is called Mao's Great Famine: The History of China's Most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958-1962

China was subjected to not one, but two, bouts of genocide wherein Mao basically declared war on the Chinese people. The "Great Leap Forward" is just the first one. The second is the so-called "Cultural Revolution" and Dikötter has a history of that, too: The Cultural Revolution: A People's History, 1962-1976.

After the economic disaster of the Great Leap Forward that claimed tens of millions of lives from 1958-1962, an aging Mao Zedong launched an ambitious scheme to shore up his reputation and eliminate those he viewed as a threat to his legacy. The stated goal of the Cultural Revolution was to purge the country of bourgeois, capitalistic elements he claimed were threatening genuine communist ideology. Young students formed the Red Guards, vowing to defend the Chairman to the death, but soon rival factions started fighting each other in the streets with semiautomatic weapons in the name of revolutionary purity. As the country descended into chaos, the military intervened, turning China into a garrison state marked by bloody purges that crushed as many as one in fifty people.

As usual, the foaming, sputtering 1-star reviews by Maoist apologists are thigh-slapping funny. My favorite is the one that said "hey, Mao made a few mistakes, just like any other leader."

Ignoring the Obvious

Last week, commenting on 'Dabiq', the magazine of ISIS, Scoggdog asked:

Why is it, from Mein Kampf to Dabiq and everything in between ... are all tyrants motivated to tell you what they're going to do before they do it, in either writing or video ... and then so many people so committed to simply refusing to take them at their word ?

There's actually two questions here:

(1) why do bad guys monologue? -and-
(2) why don't people listen?

I'll give some short answers before I get to what I really want to talk about. My answer to #1 is that nobody, not even a bad guy, likes to think of themselves as a bad guy. So they have to believe that what they're doing is right, and furthermore, they want you to believe it, too. That's why it is not uncommon for confessions to come gushing out of criminals like water from a broken fire hydrant. They want the police to know all the extenuating circumstances of why they did what they did. As for #2, I don't think this is universal. I think you see this mostly in liberals, because part of the liberal worldview is the belief in the inherent goodness of man, particularly nations and cultures other than your own. So when it says in Dabiq that they're going to kill all the infidels, the liberal replies, no, that's just bluster. In other words, they can't possibly mean that.

So, this being the book thread, I need a tie-in to books and literature, and thanks to moronette Elisabeth Wolfe, I have one. She e-mailed a few days ago and said:

After WWII, of course, the cries of “How could this happen? How could you let Hitler take power?” were rampant, and two Swiss Jews set out to answer them in such a way to warn people not to let it happen again. Both wrote plays in the grotesque mode, very similar to Flannery O’Connor (but funnier, IMHO). Max Frisch’s is Biedermann und die Brandstifter, translated with the titles The Firebugs and Biedermann and the Arsonists; Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s is Der Besuch der Alten Dame, translated as The Visit. I read both in German and highly recommend them. The stories are very different in plot, but they share one major theme: average people, especially those who are harboring guilt or are trying to rationalize their mistreatment of someone else, flat out refuse to believe that anyone could openly state a desire to commit a heinous crime and be serious about it. When someone does (the arsonists in Biedermann frankly admitting their plan to turn Biedermann’s attic into a firebomb, the old woman offering to save the town if someone will kill the man who ruined her life), most people assume they must be joking—until it’s too late.

Fortunately, English translations of these plays exist:

The Visit
The Arsonists
alt: The Firebugs

It's good to know that there are plays out there that don't parrot progressive talking points. Not sure how often they get performed, though, either on or off Broadway.


Secret Service Man

On Tuesday, ace provided some commentary on a video of CNN bobblehead Don Lemon trying to talk tough to former Secret Service Agent Dan Bongino because he refused to participate in the daily doubleplus ungood Donald Trump hate ritual.

I thought, "Dan Bongino. Hmmm. That name rings a bell. Didn't he write a book about his experiences in the White House?"

As a matter of fact, he's written two.

His first one, published in 2013, is Life Inside the Bubble: Why a Top-Ranked Secret Service Agent Walked Away from It All. The Amazon blurb says it shows us

...an intimate look at life inside the presidential “bubble,” a haze of staffers, consultants, cronies, acolytes, bureaucrats and lobbyists that creates the “alternate reality” in which monumental policy decisions are made. And it is the story of a dedicated Secret Service professional who, after years inside the “bubble,” walked away in favor of sounding a clarion call to the American people in defense of sane government and the US Constitution. Finally, why the Fast & Furious scandal, the bombings in Boston and the terrorist attacks in Benghazi are harbingers of what’s to come without a bold change in direction

And then earlier this year, his second book was published. The Fight: A Secret Service Agent's Inside Account of Security Failings and the Political Machine is a sequel to the first:

In The Fight, Dan Bongino picks up the story where his New York Times bestselling book Life Inside the Bubble ends, tackling current political and security issues and offering new solutions. From Hillary's emails to the security failings at the White House (including the drone crash and the fence jumper); from Charlie Hebdo to Bowe Bergdahl--the author examines how our current administration has allowed our security efforts to lapse both at home and abroad. He also offers solutions to the growing terrorist threat and how we can protect American citizens while also deconstructing what's wrong with our political process and what his experience running for office has taught him.

Too bad he lost both his bids for public office.


Help a Moron Out

This comment was posted on the chess thread yesterday:

33 Since it's also an open thread, can I ask a favor? I've just realized that my about-to-be 8th grader has so idea what the Enlightenment is or why it's important, no idea of natural rights, no fundamental knowledge of why western civilization is kind of a big deal. I've failed him, but in my defense he's not here full time. Are there any books for a 13 year old that can help here? He's a voracious reader, so that helps. Wasn't sure the book thread was going to pop up...

Posted by: Discobobby at August 13, 2016 05:57 PM (0i5Sw)

So it sounds like this boy is at the age where he's just about to get hit with all the progressive "America is the most racist/sexist/homophobic/evil country on earth, multiculturalism is totes great, let's spend all semester reading about wonderful women and scummy men" crap, if he's not getting it already. I can't think of any titles offhand, so I'm hoping some of you morons can come up with something.

And I'm thinking it doesn't necessarily have to be explicit instruction on Western civ (NTTAWWT), it could be novels and stories that reflect the values that made Western civilization great.


Moron Recommendations

Still dining out on ace's book rec thread (which I've been dining out on for weeks now):

Longtime moron commenter redbanzai noted he had completed his "annual reread" of the book Warlock, by Oakley Hall, a book I had never heard of until he mentioned it.

Warlock can be called a "western" only because it takes place in the American West, but it's not your typical western adventure story.As one Amazon reviewer writes:

This is pretty much an existential western, our hero a man confronted with living up to a code which even he knows is phony and impossible to sustain, and those who love him trying to make it possible for someone, anyone, to live their life truly. Unfortunately, when the hero knows this is happening, conflict ensues. Well, it's a great book, a better western than The Ox-Bow Incident, with more action and a more provocative theme.

As it happens, Warlock is the first of a trilogy of westerns by hall. The second in the series is The Bad Lands and the third is Apaches.


What I'm Reading

I'm finishing up Lines of Departure, on book #2 of the 'Frontlines' series by Marko Kloos. It's a page-turning military sci-fi series and I recommend it to those of you who like military sci-fi. I notice that all four books in the series are on sale for $2.00 each.

___________


I've started Hillary's America: The Secret History of the Democratic Party by Dinesh D'Souza, just the first few pages so far, but I find myself asking the question, who's he trying to convince? There is a mini-review on the front cover that reads "Utterly terrifying - and based on a true story. --William Peter Blatty, author and producer, The Exorcist" Really? So is Hillary supposed to be Satan or the girl spitting pea soup as her head twists round and round? And of all the pull-quotes the publisher could have used, they chose one from an author who got lucky with a schlock horror story? Personally, I think it's funny, but I'm a moron, and on this blog, the equivalence of Hillary with Satan is a given. Oh, and one more thing, at one point, D'Souza refers to Hillary disparagingly as "a broad". Again, really? If you're writing a book that claims to be a history of something, don't you think less vitriol and more dispassionate analysis would be in order?

As I said, I've just started reading the book, so I'm hoping D'Souza will calm down and argue his points with sobriety. Because I think his thesis is absolutely correct; that is, that the Democratic Party has always been rife with racism, greed, and corruption, and that this truth has been carefully swept under the rug and kept from public discussion. I'm just concerned (heh) that that he's just preaching to the choir, and that this book is not going to expose the decades-long cover-up of the sleazy history of the Democratic Party.


___________

Don't forget the AoSHQ reading group on Goodreads. It's meant to support horde writers and to talk about the great books that come up on the book thread. It's called AoSHQ Moron Horde and the link to it is here: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/175335-aoshq-moron-horde.


___________

So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, bribes, rumors, threats, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at the book thread e-mail address: aoshqbookthread, followed by the 'at' sign, and then 'G' mail, and then dot cee oh emm.

What have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good, because, as you all know, life is too short to be reading lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 09:00 AM




Comments

(Jump to bottom of page)

1 Good Morning.

Posted by: HH at August 14, 2016 09:00 AM (DrCtv)

2 Good morning bookworms
Was reading A Time for Trumpets by Col Charles B MacDonald on my Kindle Unlimited and knew time was running out to finish it. Was on around chapter 26 Bastogne Tuesday morning and when I got home all my borrowed Kindle books were gone. So two questions;
1)If I turned my Tablet to airplane mode would they have disappeared?
2)How did the book end? Did the Americans win?

(Kidding of course)

Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:05 AM (bksJQ)

3 Morning all

So I see Milwaukee is on BLM fire now...fuck them all, let all the inner cities burn down

Posted by: Nevergiveup at August 14, 2016 09:06 AM (Ozsfq)

4 If anyone has a complete set of Marshall Cavendish WW2 Encyclopedias they want to sell, I am looking for a set. If the price is right.

Thought I would ask here before I start looking through ebay.

Posted by: Tim in Illinois. at August 14, 2016 09:07 AM (WVsWD)

5 Still reading Daniel Silva's Black Widow.

Very relevant to todays world.

Another Gabriel Allon novel.

A series of enjoyable books.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at August 14, 2016 09:08 AM (ptqRm)

6 A reasonably sharp 13-year-old could easily digest "The Politically Incorrect Guide to Western Civilization" by Anthony Esolen, I got it from Amazon.

Posted by: yop at August 14, 2016 09:08 AM (Q4sxC)

7 I've been meaning to read some C S Lewis for quite a while now, and i was looking through the infinite stack of books I have accumulated and saw his "Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly On Prayer" and picked it up as I was not in the mood for fluff. All I can say is I was blown away by the elegance of his writing and the fundamental issues he raises about the practice of the Christian faith.

I need to read a lot more of his work!

Also ordered and started reading Ivan Doig's "This Land of Sky" mentioned here last week. So far it's really holding my interest and is giving me a picture of life in one of those real worlds that has vanished forever. It's also making me wish I had recorded my parents' reminiscences about the pre-WWII era. It always seems to me that people back then lead far more interesting and varied lives.


Posted by: Hrothgar at August 14, 2016 09:09 AM (wYnyS)

8 I would wonder if Battle Cry of Freedom by James McPherson on the Civil war is above a 13 yr old. It does get high marks to understand the cause and how it all played out.

Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:11 AM (bksJQ)

9 Good morning fellow Book Threadists.

I came across a reference to Beatrix Potter somewhere and realized this was another children's classic I never read. Off to the library for The Complete Tales. Like Winnie the Pooh and Wind In The Willows, I found the stories charming, imaginative and sometimes clever. The Victorian era style was also appealing. (I'm old enough and secure enough that 'cute' doesn't bother me.) But it was the illustrations that grabbed my attention. Simply put, they are superb.

Potter was an outstanding illustrator, mixing in accuracy with the whimsy. After a few pages I was concentrating on the scene depicted and wasn't put off by a bunny in a blue jacket or a momma mouse in a house dress and apron. She worked mostly in water color and pen and ink. On learning more about her it turns out she was capable of text book level accuracy for drawing plants and animals. Without trying for photo-realism, she showed shape, texture and detail enough for any purpose. Very impressive. Mind you I could do the same thing if I had any talent and her observational skills. And knew how to paint. And knew how to draw. :-)

It turns out Potter was quite the business woman. After the huge popularity of 'Peter Rabbit', she started a merchandising campaign with stuffed animals from the story, decorative plates, coloring books, etc., all under patent. Also, she was a dedicated country farmer who acquired good land and bred prize winning animals, especially sheep. I find her an impressive, smart, determined and talented woman. A lot of people could take lessons from her life.

I'm sure I'll end up with 'The Complete Tales' and one of the better biographies for the book shelves.

I was looking for some distraction from current events and even 'heavy' reading. To my utter surprise, Beatrix Potter filled the bill.

Posted by: JTB at August 14, 2016 09:13 AM (V+03K)

10 LOL, I had just checked to see if up and then went to place an order to Amazon and now I am 15 min late.


Busy week this week.


Didn't complete We Were Soldiers book. I loved the movie but the book became tedious. It seems every other paragraph was "so and so got hit (somewhere grotesque). It became depressing and repetitive. I made it through about 4 chapters of that and simply closed it up. Maybe I will go back at a later date, but I still have the movie.


I moved on to that 24 book series of the Tarzan saga I got cheap. I paused it yesterday after finishing the 7th book. Seven Tarzan's in a row is enough for a while. I will go back to that one later too.


Now on the Wen Spencer Elfhome series. On the second book in that series now.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at August 14, 2016 09:13 AM (mpXpK)

11 I grew up in a victorian home that was not that big, but it did have a library.
It had built in floor-to-ceiling bookshelves, and the most lovely window seat. The window protruded from the front of the house so that the window seat fit 2 people lengthwise comfortably. Trees and bushes outside the window ensured shade and privacy. I spent many hours there reading. Sadly, heard from my brother that the new owners merged this room with the master bed room to make room for a yuuge master bath). Such a shame.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 14, 2016 09:15 AM (NOIQH)

12 There is a movie version of Warlock with Henry Fonda ,Anthony Quinn and Richard Widmark.

Posted by: steevy at August 14, 2016 09:15 AM (fA75F)

13 Re Mao -

China is going to have to come to terms with him sooner or later.

The current schizophrenia - The Great Helmsman and savior of the people is not to be ridiculed, nor is he to be emulated or even admired too enthusiastically - can't last. The tension is untenable.

Rssia and stalin - same deal.

Imagine the greatest hero of your nation was also a murderous psychopath who plunged the people into unimaginable misery. That's what they're gonna have to deal with.

Knew a GPW vet, Red Army. He said he would gladly have laid down his life for Stalin, who was, he maintained, a great man, and the only one who could beat the Germans. He also said that he and every man he knew would not only gladly die for Stalin, but would fight each other to the death for the chance to kill the man.

I do think he was right - faced with an inhuman monster, bent on genocide, only another inhuman monster could face him down. We in the west would never have been able to bleed the Reich white on the battlefield - we couldn't imagine mass battles of attrition with dead and wounded numbering in the millions. Stalin, however, had no problem with it.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 09:15 AM (kGelp)

14 Obama wrote (allegedly) "Dreams of my Father" and "The Audacity of Hope", where he clearly

1) show his narcissism
2) his propensity for fabricating stories
3) his bedrock belief in socialism

Yet to this day, his own words in his own books are not used against him, to illuminate who he is. And humoressly enough, George Bush read "Dreams of my Father" and didn't realize Obama actually meant it.
Have you seen Barry Soetoro's grades? (sound like David Lee Roth in "Hot for Teacher")

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at August 14, 2016 09:17 AM (S6Pax)

15 "Young students formed the Red Guards, vowing to defend the Chairman to the death, but soon rival factions started fighting each other in the streets with semiautomatic weapons in the name of revolutionary purity. As the country descended into chaos, the military intervened, turning China into a garrison state marked by bloody purges that crushed as many as one in fifty people."

Are we talking about Mao or Chairman Obama?.....

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at August 14, 2016 09:17 AM (ej1L0)

16 DiscoBobby, I have the Cartoon History of the United States by Larry Gonick. He is a left leaning writer, but he also does his research well, as all of his books are. I would look at the Cartoon guide to the United States and the the Cartoon guide to the Universe books 1,2 and 3. Ignore the chapters on Israel and Jesus,but They tie world history together very well. I just looked at my library website and they are at the Greensboro Public Library so if you are cheap like me check at the library.

Posted by: Picric at August 14, 2016 09:17 AM (s0VSd)

17 >>If I turned my Tablet to airplane mode would they have disappeared?
Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:05 AM (

When I used to borrow from the library (before they got a different system that annoyed me) turning it on airplane mode would work.

Posted by: Lea at August 14, 2016 09:19 AM (vmMMi)

18 Love the A.D.White library. It was always impossible to get a carrel there though. I ended up buried in the lowest depths of Uris Library most Saturdays, but took walks through AD White when I needed a break.

Just found Toxic Charity on the conference room table on Friday--we sublet from a bank, and someone at the bank had placed it there I guess.

I'll be sitting in that conf room reading it over lunch the next couple days.

Posted by: TexasDan at August 14, 2016 09:20 AM (4/qS7)

19 Finally finished 'The Korean War' this week. If you have even a mild interest in military history, I strongly recommend the book. By Max Hastings, who also authored 'Overloard-Day and the Battle for Normandy'.

It is very well written, not at all tedious to read, and comprehensive. Hundreds of references, and it is well indexed.

While most of us know the highlights of the conflict, i.e. Inchon, Chosin Resevoir, etc., Hastings discusses in detail what was going on at both the micro and macro levels, both on the ground and at the international diplomatic/political level.

Long story short, it was a Charlie Foxtrot at all levels. I really can not over-endorse the book. Hastings, a Brit, brings to the story a frank and unbiased perspective that would not be very easy for American writer/historian.

ABE Books free shipping site has a number of copies at $3.47 :

http://preview.tinyurl.com/me9wvuw

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at August 14, 2016 09:21 AM (9mTYi)

20 Yay Book Thread!

Happy VJ Day from Bookhorde (in nic)

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 09:21 AM (7lVbc)

21 7 ... Hi Hrothgar, I'm sure others will chime in but I suggest CS Lewis' 'Mere Christianity', 'The Screwtape Letters', and his space trilogy. There are so many good choices for Lewis, it would be hard to go wrong. Of course there's The Narnia series.

I really enjoy his academic writings. They are mind expanding and elegantly written.

Posted by: JTB at August 14, 2016 09:22 AM (V+03K)

22 I think the ultimate irony of Mao and rooting out "capitalism" is that these days, the Chinese are more entrepenurial and willing to take business risks than Americans.

At the grass roots level, the Chinese absolutely are entrepeneurs and traders. Making people practice collectivism almost always has to be forced.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at August 14, 2016 09:22 AM (S6Pax)

23

Books? A big ole' hell yeah! I love to read,, especially the classics...



Posted by: Said no BLM protester evah! at August 14, 2016 09:22 AM (C9dMF)

24 On China, many years ago I read a bio of a lady who was in prison under Mao. I don't usually get into many biographies but it was very good. Of course I can't remember the name.

Posted by: Lea at August 14, 2016 09:23 AM (vmMMi)

25 He forgot the brandy snifter and cigar,
-----------

Smoking jacket

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at August 14, 2016 09:23 AM (9mTYi)

26 Hey guys, greetings from the blessedly cool Smokey Mountains of NC. I'm about 30 pages into V.E. Schwab's "A Darker Shade of Magic", thanks to a recommendation on this thread. Great book so far, the author has a real gift for dialogue and description.

I'm also working on Margaret MacMillan's "The War That Ended Peace". Great historian, even if she does try to make some nonsensical comparison between the Kaiser Wilhelm and George W. Bush (yeah, I know, but trust me, just skip that part, it's just one paragraph).

Even more than the WWII, the Great War aka the First World War, seems to hold some lessons for our time. The breakup of the Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires (along with the Bolshevik Revolution), really seemed to set the stage for everything we are struggling with today.

Posted by: Pave Low John at August 14, 2016 09:25 AM (OejZ/)

27 On China, many years ago I read a bio of a lady who was in prison under Mao. I don't usually get into many biographies but it was very good. Of course I can't remember the name.
Posted by: Lea

There is a very nice young woman who works for our company in Tianjin (she's Chinese) whose father had everything taken from him in the Cultural Revolution.
She still adores Mao.

It's weird. It is an idea that is inculcated into the Chinese, and is part of the 'glue' that supposedly keeps the society together.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at August 14, 2016 09:26 AM (S6Pax)

28 The trouble with an article like Frank Dikötter's on the Cultural Revolution is- how do you know what he wrote is true? There are no citations, no references given. He could just be making up those horrifying anecdotes. Wait- before you jump down my throat- there's plenty of evidence that Mao was a mass-murdering monster. But please tell me how you know that Dikotter's article is objectively true.

Someone on the Left could write about Ronald Reagan, making stuff just like that up. Wait, they DO. The Left has their pantheon of PC beliefs, based on NOTHING but hatred of anything which challenges their dogma. well, PC. Let's not be like them. Beliefs should be founded on verifiable evidence.

Posted by: Bat Chain Puller at August 14, 2016 09:26 AM (3MozY)

29 Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly On Prayer

--

That sounds good

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 09:29 AM (7lVbc)

30 "So when it says in Dabiq that they're going to kill all the infidels, the liberal replies, no, that's just bluster. In other words, they can't possibly mean that."

Because no one really believes in any religion; it's all just blathering to the Flying Spaghetti Monster. Any believer is automatically dumb and ignorant and we know it.

Posted by: SDN at August 14, 2016 09:29 AM (SSIaQ)

31 I have been reading more on my Nook or Kindle to Nook books lately. I feel badly doing this as I like real books. But I think just that it is easier to get books and not having to make a trip to the local library. The local library has books for tablets, but limited, and often with a long waiting period. Easier just to order on Amazon at a very low price...Time marches on I guess.

Posted by: Colin at August 14, 2016 09:30 AM (tVUA+)

32 Many thanks to

JAK

and

creeper

for their awesome reviews this week of

"Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den"


As the Romans would say:

Et Tu Rockus Maximus!!!


and then this being a celebration would stuff themselves with Lark's Tongue Fritters and drink the Latin equivalent of Mad Dog 20/20 then later visit the Vomitorium,

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 09:30 AM (HGtd0)

33 25 He forgot the brandy snifter and cigar,
-----------

Smoking jacket
Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at August 14, 2016 09:23 AM (9mTYi)
----

Globe with crystal decanters inside.

My favorite reading room in our book lined home was the living room, which had huge picture windows overlooking a stream. Lots of comfy chairs for reading, paintings for contemplation, masks, a tiger skin, a sword collection for sparring between chapters (I kid!) and statues of Kali and the Buddha. It was the perfect setting for immersing oneself in travel and adventure books, as you might imagine.

One of these days I'll be able to recreate that feeling of being in an exotic cocoon in a home of my own.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 14, 2016 09:31 AM (jR7Wy)

34 22 I think the ultimate irony of Mao and rooting out "capitalism" is that these days, the Chinese are more entrepenurial and willing to take business risks than Americans.

At the grass roots level, the Chinese absolutely are entrepeneurs and traders. Making people practice collectivism almost always has to be forced.
Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at August 14, 2016 09:22 AM (S6Pax)


See also: Vietnam.

Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Staring at the Lake in the rain at August 14, 2016 09:31 AM (72N6L)

35 Re:the screwtape letters: I don't really recommend that one. Certainly not to go through in one reading. It's got insights like you would expect from Lewis, but its also not uplifting--constantly reinterpreting the thing to understand what he means in "forward" mode just gets tiring after awhile.

Lewis made comments to the effect that he didn't enjoy writing it, by the end, for the same reason.

Posted by: TexasDan at August 14, 2016 09:31 AM (4/qS7)

36
Ah. OM has, in passing, mentioned Flannery O'Connor. That gives me leave to post one of my favorite quotes from her:

"Everywhere I go, I'm asked if I think the universities stifle writers. My opinion is that they don't stifle enough of them. There's many a best seller that could have been prevented by a good teacher." -- Flannery O'Connor

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at August 14, 2016 09:32 AM (9mTYi)

37 From the description of Warlock at Amazon "First published in the 1950s, at the height of the McCarthy era, Warlock.."
That McCarthy reign of terror man,how many peace loving leftists were lined up and shot?The horror.

Posted by: steevy at August 14, 2016 09:32 AM (fA75F)

38 "[where] safe spaces are underneath your house and are used as protection against actual dangers, like tornados"

The photo of the tornado shelter at the link appears to have a light-duty sheet metal door with a window in it. Nope. Nope nope nope nope nope.

Not to mention having to go outside to get to the thing.

Having seen what tornadoes can do, if I lived in tornado country, I'd want a concrete survival cell *inside* the house. With a beefy door. Without a window.

Posted by: torquewrench at August 14, 2016 09:32 AM (noWW6)

39 CS Lewis - does anyone have a reading order guide for his non-fiction?

I should probably ask Elisabeth...

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 09:33 AM (7lVbc)

40 See also: Vietnam.
Posted by: 98ZJUSMC Staring at the Lake in the rain

Our company has a factory in Bien Tre Province (Mekong Delta area). The locals call Saigon..."Saigon", not Ho Chi Minh City.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at August 14, 2016 09:33 AM (S6Pax)

41 I've been laid up a bit this week and got more reading done than usual. I'm continuing with 'The Devil's Pleasure Palace' which is the Goodreads group discussion this month. I feel the author is a bit in love with his own vocabulary but can't argue with his points. I'm enjoying his combative tone and approach. The Left, Frankfurt School types are waging a long term war on the West in general and the U.S. in particular. This is a war we need to fight if any of the benefits of western civilization are to survive.

I hope others leave comments on the Goodreads discussion. There are only two of us so far. And this book bristles with echoes from CS Lewis, Chesterton, and others. It should make for some lively talk.

Posted by: JTB at August 14, 2016 09:34 AM (V+03K)

42 You can fool some of the people all of the time. And that's enough.

Posted by: Obama at August 14, 2016 09:34 AM (UGjBj)

43 I never read "Hitler's Willing Executioners" but saw it discussed on BookTV when it came out in 1996. It's by Daniel Goldhagen and is subtitled "Ordinary Germans and the Holocaust."

One part of the discussion that stuck with me was the How? aspect. In the early days of Nazi Germany, the Gestapo was charged with purging society of the undesirables, but they had an impossible task; there weren't enough Gestapo officers to do the job. So they put one Gestapo guy in a neighborhood and he out the word out that he needed help - informants - to tell him who the bad people were. After a few tips that (say) there's a lesbian in the neighborhood, he'd have her picked up and sent away.

With time, this got easier. It was easier still in other countries like Poland.

The author says that not only did ordinary people know about the Holocaust, it would have been impossible to perpetrate without their help.

Scary stuff.

Posted by: FireHorse at August 14, 2016 09:35 AM (lhvb+)

44 Former spook John Schindler complains that Max Hastings plagiarized his prior writing on Austro-Hungarian military history. I haven't read either of the works in question and can't confirm this, but Schindler was really pissed off when this came to his attention.

Posted by: torquewrench at August 14, 2016 09:36 AM (noWW6)

45 It's weird. It is an idea that is inculcated into the Chinese, and is part of the 'glue' that supposedly keeps the society together.
Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at August 14, 2016 09:26 AM (S6Pax)
----
It's respect for the strong man coupled with ethnic identity. We don't understand it in this country because we're anti-authoritarian and not tribe/ethnicity-oriented.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 14, 2016 09:36 AM (jR7Wy)

46 I feel the SJW movement is today's Red Guard and the West is going through its own Great Cultural Revolution.

Depending on age of the young man in the question regarding teaching about the value of western civilization I wonder if the Narnia Chronicles would be a good, gentle, place to start.

Posted by: Northernlurker at August 14, 2016 09:36 AM (s7hQ/)

47 JTB, I wasn't able to get hold of a copy of The Devil's Pleasure Palace.

You seem to be enjoying it - would you be interested in doing a guest review for my blog?

Email me at votermom at g mail if you're interested...

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 09:38 AM (7lVbc)

48 Have you seen Barry Soetoro's grades?

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at August 14, 2016 09:17 AM (S6Pax)


I thought his grades hadn't been released, or unsealed, or whatever. Or so I was told.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 09:38 AM (S2qL1)

49 Bossy -

Yep. When I went there last year with my angel to visit her relations, it was Saigon, not HCM city.

Good people, friendly, and - in the provinces, because the urbanites are used to us - overjoyed to meet an American. Bring out their best, which wasn't much, but you knew it was the best they had, to greet and host you.

Talk to a Vietnamese about 'the war' and they'll assume you mean WWII or maybe the Sino-Vietnamese War. Our involvement there is sort of glossed over by most people, Party Cadres when in public excluded, of course.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 09:38 AM (kGelp)

50 >>On China, many years ago I read a bio of a lady who was in prison under
Mao. I don't usually get into many biographies but it was very good. Of
course I can't remember the name.


Was it "Life and Death in Shanghai" by Chang Nien?
Excellent book, horrible account of what happened to her.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 14, 2016 09:41 AM (NOIQH)

51 One of the hardest parts of writing my thesis on Claire Chennault and the U.S. aviation advisors in 1930s China was seeing all the missed opportunities the United States had to help China avoid it's descent into communist misery. China thought they were sticking it to the rich fat-cats like Chiang Kai-shek and his cronies and going with the man who truly cared for the average man on the street (sound familiar?). Unfortunately, they discovered that a warlord like the Generalissimo was a thousand times better than a monster like Mao.


I found a telling quote from an interview that Madame Chiang did with an American reporter in the late 1930s. The reporter asked why the Chinese Communists weren't corrupt like the Nationalists led by her husband. Madame Chiang retorted "Because they have no power now. Just wait until they get power, then you will see". Sadly, that quote turned out to be right on the money....

Posted by: Pave Low John at August 14, 2016 09:41 AM (OejZ/)

52 Ugh - Cheng Nien.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 14, 2016 09:42 AM (NOIQH)

53 Tim another very good History Of the WWII is Purnell's magazines printed in late 60's and then reprinted in early 70's. I have most of them and doubles of a lot of them. This week started looking on Ebay for ones I'm missing. ( mostly in 60's on up). It is a 96 issues then subsequent 31 issues more (total 12

Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:42 AM (bksJQ)

54 I had a chat with my niece, who will be graduating from college in December. She is not a conservative, but she mentioned she had dropped a women's studies course because the professor was pushing the "men are bad and are oppressing us" line of bs and, since my niece would shake her head slightly to indicate she wasn't buying it, the prof would call on her constantly to ask her opinion - so she and the other students could attack it. My niece felt so uncomfortable she dropped the course. She said there were a few guys in the class who simply nodded and said, "Oh, sure, yeah, we're bad, we are responsible for the world's problems" just to get though the class.

My niece is an accounting major and much prefers her STEM classes, which have not been politicized. I was relieved to hear her say most of the kids she knows don't buy that bs.

But even my niece seemed not to understand when I said college should be about being able to voice and debate all POVs, not just a leftist one. She has been lectured to by leftist teachers her entire life - it's like she can't imagine a illiberal arts teacher allowing an alternative view. You either agree, leave the class, or sit there and pretend to agree. I told her that in the late '70's and early '80's my liberal arts profs might have voted Dem, but were not enemies of western civ. and didn't politicize English or History classes and allowed a variety of views. She couldn't comprehend that.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame) at August 14, 2016 09:43 AM (P8951)

55 I did it again, never type a eight and a ) after

Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:44 AM (bksJQ)

56 Pave Low -

My former employer was the daughter of one of Chiang's generals.

It was funny - never noticed it until she pointed it out - that we westerners call him by a sort of Cantonese version of his name.

Jiang Jieshi is a lot closer to his name, but because of the large Chinese diaspora in the states, we call him Chiang.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 09:45 AM (kGelp)

57 Barak might be the Only president that we don't know what courses he took or grades.
Speculate it how you want.

Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:46 AM (bksJQ)

58 I think it's telling that some Obama czars and lackies self-identified as Maoists or, at least , quoted him a lot in the early days of TFG's administration.

Not to mention the Mao Christmas tree decorations.

Mao, who said several times under various circumstances that it would be best if half the population of China died socialism would be achieved

saw his fellow countrymen and women as no more than pawns to be sacrificed for his grand and glorious vision of socialism with himself at the top, natch.

The plans of TFG, his backers and Our Betters would seem to follow the guiding principle that half our population(middle class) is of no use to them.

No outright murder though, so we got that working for us.

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 09:46 AM (HGtd0)

59 I'm reading Camille Paglia's "Glittering Images" which is her critique of great works of Western visual art.

I'm enjoying it greatly. Paglia on politics is a mix of nonsense and good sense (fears a huge overweening government - but votes for Bernie and Jill Stein. Really, Camille?) but Paglia on the arts is a pleasure to read.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame) at August 14, 2016 09:48 AM (P8951)

60 39 CS Lewis - does anyone have a reading order guide for his non-fiction?
I should probably ask Elisabeth...

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 09:33 AM (7lVbc)


What kind of "order" are you thinking of, thematic, chronological, or something else?

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 09:48 AM (S2qL1)

61 Madame, the old boss, said the KMT secret was that they weren't godless.

Christians and Muslims (sounds weird, but the KMT had a lot of muslims, both footsoldiers and generals) made up the leadership cadre, with Christians on top.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 09:48 AM (kGelp)

62 Somebody introduce jwest to Moo Moo. They are kindred souls.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at August 14, 2016 09:49 AM (MNgU2)

63 13: Imagine the greatest hero of your nation was also a murderous psychopath who plunged the people into unimaginable misery. That's what they're gonna have to deal with.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine
________

Uh-huh. I've known a few Georgians and through them have met a few others. They all have opinions about Stalin, the most famous Georgian ever.

Short version: He was very bad, but not all bad.

Posted by: FireHorse at August 14, 2016 09:49 AM (lhvb+)

64 I started reading 'The Collected Letters of CS Lewis, Volume 2' which covers the years 1931 to 1949. I thought I knew about Lewis from reading about the Inklings and a couple of biographies. But his personal correspondence, so far, is more varied and revealing than expected. One letter discusses planting trees, the next deals with the value of the Gospels versus the Epistles, while the next discusses the merits of some bawdy limericks (which he quotes) he heard. Lewis wrote a LOT of letters. This volume is over a thousand pages. Turns out volumes 1 and 2 are available on Kindle for 1.99 each. For some reason volume three costs about 18 bucks for the Kindle version. At that price it can wait a while. The book is turning out to be more revealing and fun than expected.

Posted by: JTB at August 14, 2016 09:49 AM (V+03K)

65 And finished the restaurant I've been working at all summer and back at famous college renovating a library/ reading room. Not as spectacular as some of OM's finds but hope it can make the book thread someday.

Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:49 AM (bksJQ)

66 33 Since it's also an open thread, can I ask a favor? I've just realized that my about-to-be 8th grader has so idea what the Enlightenment is or why it's important, no idea of natural rights, no fundamental knowledge of why western civilization is kind of a big deal. I've failed him, but in my defense he's not here full time. Are there any books for a 13 year old that can help here? He's a voracious reader, so that helps. Wasn't sure the book thread was going to pop up...

Posted by: Discobobby at August 13, 2016 05:57 PM (0i5Sw)

Buy the Will and Ariel Durant series The History of Civilization. Durant is definitely what the world used to call a classic liberal and the books are old, but in my opinion those are what make it worth tracking down and shelling out some cash for them because although they are written from a humanist position, Durant imbibed enough Catholicism to fairly portray Western civ without the PC agenda.

Posted by: whatmeworry? at August 14, 2016 09:50 AM (dZGNV)

67 What kind of "order" are you thinking of, thematic, chronological, or something else?
Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 09:48 AM (S2qL1)

Thematic

Which does one read first kind of thing.

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 09:50 AM (7lVbc)

68

Is jwest still around? I was under the impression that all of the Hot Air refugees had moved on to HotGas.net

Posted by: Arbalest at August 14, 2016 09:51 AM (FlRtG)

69 Every Sunday am there is a lecture aired on a local PBS Station from the Pritzker Military Library. Just looked it up and it seems as though it would be very interesting. They have a new facility on Michigan Ave in Chicago and no pics of main reading room yet. Also in Wheaton, IL at Cantigny is a large museum of Big Red 1 (I know they do reenactments and usually have old equipment for parades).

Another museum in Wheaton is the CS Lewis collection at the Wheaton College Library. Haven't been to Wheaton in a while, so there are two to check out.

I had heard that Northern Ill Univ had a fantastic collection of SciFi original manuscripts, etc, but I haven't been to DeKalb aside from passing through in 30 years, so I don't know how accessible it is.

Posted by: mustbequantum at August 14, 2016 09:51 AM (MIKMs)

70 You have to consider that Mao was fighting a potential civil war and besides, if you take the number of deaths as a percentage of population, it was hardly anything. And the United States killed Indians!!!!

Posted by: Communist applogist at August 14, 2016 09:52 AM (MNgU2)

71 Posted by: Arbalest at August 14, 2016 09:51 AM (FlRtG)

He is. And I thought he had been here for quite some time, and was not a Hot Air refugee.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame) at August 14, 2016 09:52 AM (P8951)

72 65 And finished the restaurant I've been working at all summer and back at famous college renovating a library/ reading room. Not as spectacular as some of OM's finds but hope it can make the book thread someday.
Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:49 AM (bksJQ)


Dude. Send me a photo of your library renovation when you think it's ready and I'll put it up.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 09:52 AM (S2qL1)

73 That White reading room at Cornell is obviously raaaaaacist!

Posted by: TrivialPursuer at August 14, 2016 09:53 AM (NnYnv)

74 I found some rather disappointing news. Lt. Colo. Ralph Peters, author of many books, including his four historical novels about the Civil War, Cain at Gettysburg, Hell or Richmond, The Valley of the Shadow, and The Damned of Petersburg, and who gained fame and a suspension by calling Obozo a "total pussy" on Fox News, has allegedly come our for Hillzebub. A reviewer on Amazon made that allegation and while I was unable to verify that, I did find comments brutally criticizing Trump on national security/foreign policy grounds. Given the absolute disaster we've experienced in foreign policy these last eight years, I have to think that any aware person would have to think Trump, as obviously limited as he is, would be an improvement.

Regardless, his Civil War novels are very good and I will continue to enjoy them.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 09:53 AM (Nwg0u)

75 I came up the hard way on Western civ, immersed in the deep original source texts, but I wouldn't drop all that on a 13-year-old, especially not without a teacher providing a road map to tie it all together.

The idea of a single-volume primer on the subject is interesting, and there is an obvious need for it.

Two suggestions come to mind:

(a) Regnery has a line of "Politically Incorrect Guides" on various controversial topics. They've got one on Western Civilization.

(b) Niall Ferguson recently wrote a popularization on the subject, _The West and the Rest_. Since he's an economic historian, you can expect that this is pretty predictably weighted towards economic factors.

Posted by: torquewrench at August 14, 2016 09:54 AM (noWW6)

76 >>course I can't remember the name.
Was it "Life and Death in Shanghai" by Chang Nien?
Excellent book, horrible account of what happened to her.
Posted by: Lizzy at August 14, 2016 09:41 AM (NOIQH)

That looks right! Thanks! It's been a long time since I read it..

Posted by: Lea at August 14, 2016 09:55 AM (vmMMi)

77 it is not uncommon for confessions to come gushing out of criminals like water from a broken fire hydrant. They want the police to know all the extenuating circumstances of why they did what they did.

-
If God and the judge truly understood the situation, they'd know I did the right thing.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 09:55 AM (Nwg0u)

78 From the warlord era, my favorite. The dogmeat general, 72 cannon Zhang, General Three Not Knows:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zhang_Zongchang

Had White Russians manning armored trains, among other things. A real character.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 09:57 AM (kGelp)

79
Donna&&&&&V:

I read his comments many times at HA ... seemed ok. The first time I saw him here was just after HA went Facebook.

Posted by: Arbalest at August 14, 2016 09:57 AM (FlRtG)

80 47 ... votermom, Email sent.

Posted by: JTB at August 14, 2016 09:58 AM (V+03K)

81 I have most of the Durant's History of Civilization, had Napoleon's for 35 years and picked up what I have at Goodwill. I didn't get the ones before 1600's and kick myself for not getting them .
No 13 year old can read 800 page tomes or should, ok I have but no other.

Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:58 AM (bksJQ)

82 OM I hope to be there at end but if not hoping a press release from collage.

Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 10:00 AM (bksJQ)

83 CS Lewis - does anyone have a reading order guide for his non-fiction?



I should probably ask Elisabeth...

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 09:33 AM (7lVbc)

Oh, gosh. The man wrote a lot--not as much as Chesterton, but still--and I haven't read it all. The best approach that comes to mind, though, is chronological by topic, or else major works first (I'd start with Surprised by Joy, Mere Christianity, On Stories and Other Essays, The Weight of Glory and Other Essays, God in the Dock, The Four Loves, and The Discarded Image) before exploring other books on one topic or another. David Lyle Jeffrey recommends skipping The Allegory of Love altogether, since it was an early work and Lewis had refined or changed the majority of his opinions by the time he wrote The Discarded Image at the end of his life. And books like An Experiment in Criticism and OHEL might not be of much interest outside BritLit circles--although Experiment in Criticism does explain a lot about people who won't read a book more than once.
Also, a note of caution about A Grief Observed: a friend who's even more of a Lewis scholar than I am once told me it was hard enough for her to read when she wasn't grieving and might actually be hurtful to someone in the midst of a bereavement. YMMV.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at August 14, 2016 10:00 AM (m2sZd)

84 Since it's also an open thread, can I ask a favor? I've just realized that my about-to-be 8th grader has so idea what the Enlightenment is or why it's important, no idea of natural rights, no fundamental knowledge of why western civilization is kind of a big deal. I've failed him, but in my defense he's not here full time. Are there any books for a 13 year old that can help here? He's a voracious reader, so that helps. Wasn't sure the book thread was going to pop up...

Posted by: Discobobby at August 13, 2016 05:57 PM (0i5Sw)

Might be worthwhile to check out what Hillsdale college has available. Not for college level reading per se but ideas for what you're looking for.

Start down the rabbit hole of reference material until you find what you need.

Or not. Never mind me. I'll be over hear mouth breathing and staring off into space.


Posted by: weirdflunkyonatablet at August 14, 2016 10:00 AM (AqWq4)

85 Oh, and I wanted to give a mention to Barbara Tuchman for good overview historical writing. I know I mentioned it before, but she is accessible for YA readers and does not have an overt PC bias.

Posted by: mustbequantum at August 14, 2016 10:01 AM (MIKMs)

86 Favorite story of Zhang:

Promised his men, before a battle, that he would return in triumph or in a coffin.

He got whipped. Came back sitting upright in a coffin carried by his men, smoking a big cigar.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 10:02 AM (kGelp)

87 Thematic

Which does one read first kind of thing.

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 09:50 AM (7lVbc)


Honestly? I don't think it matters. If you're talking thematic, there's probably no good way to categorize Lewis' books. I would recommend something like this:

1.Screwtape Letters
2.Mere Christianity
3.God in the Dock and Other Essays
4.The Abolition of Man
5.The Weight of Glory

...and then you should be so familiar with Lewis that you can figure out which ones to read yourself.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 10:02 AM (S2qL1)

88 Actually, I strongly suspect China is gearing up to do it again, on a far greater scale than before. They have a serious demographic bulge problem looming and an economy that cannot possibly grow to include the several hundred million still effectively living in the 17th Century.

But how did China fall to the Communists in the first place? One big clue comes from the book I'm currently reading, 'Blacklisted By History' by M. Stanton Evans. This makes a very good case that Senator Joseph McCarthy was right about damn near everything and is one of the most slandered men of the 20th Century.

Posted by: Epobirs at August 14, 2016 10:03 AM (IdCqF)

89
In my experience, 13-year-olds like Ray Bradbury.

They also like science. If you can find a solid book on whatever kind of science the kid likes, he could start getting used to thinking scientifically in the coming headwinds of academic superstitions about climate, gender, race, etc.

Posted by: iforgot says God bless Drooper at August 14, 2016 10:06 AM (5o5ek)

90 My kids read Lewis's The Great Divorce as part of their British Lit course senior year, and they have all loved it. One came back after her freshman year in college looking for it to read again, and finally found it in her brother's room, as he kept it instead of putting it back on the family room shelves.

This same brother wrote a paper on it for an English class at college.

My kids so far have considered it their favorite book from their homeschooling years.

Posted by: bluebell at August 14, 2016 10:06 AM (805dc)

91 In light of the final round of the Olympic golf event I'm watching now, I will recommend my favorite author Steven Pressfield and his book, Legend of Bagger Vance. Six or seven years ago I had read all of Pressfield's historic fiction books up to that time without realizing he had written LOBV , a book I had heard of as a golfer but never read. What a great book.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at August 14, 2016 10:07 AM (MNgU2)

92 Also, a note of caution about A Grief Observed: a friend who's even more of a Lewis scholar than I am once told me it was hard enough for her to read when she wasn't grieving and might actually be hurtful to someone in the midst of a bereavement. YMMV.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at August 14, 2016 10:00 AM (m2sZd)


I've heard that Lewis was never quite the same after he lost Joy. Her death was quite a blow to him. A Grief Observed is a compilation of the notebooks he kept detailing his grief as he was working through it, so unlike his other books, he doesn't present you with a thesis and argument already worked out, but you see a lost soul struggling to find his way. I tried to read it after my parents passed in 2012, could not complete it.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 10:07 AM (S2qL1)

93 I'm reading Wearing the Cat and I have to say, I just don't get it. I'm going to finish it but I have not yet laughed.

I just started "Hillbilly Elegy" which I expect to enjoy greatly as Daddy's side of the family is Scots-Irish albeit from the Smokies.

And I'm reading "Hollywood Party" still. I'm appalled by so many whose movies I have enjoyed. I never go to the movies any more so it has no immediate affect when I hear current "stars" telling me that I'm either evil or stupid. I have read that there is a Stephen King clause in contracts now because of how much King hated Kubrick's "The Shining" and the writer can't criticize the finished product or something like that. Wouldn't it be wise of producers to put a similar clause in the actors' contracts: you can insult your audience? But then, I don't consume their lousy product ....

Posted by: Tonestaple at August 14, 2016 10:07 AM (VsZJP)

94 >>That looks right! Thanks! It's been a long time since I read it..

Me, too!
Years after reading it I went to Taiwan on business, and on weekends I visited the museums. My favorite was the National Palace Museum, which is filled with art and other treasures smuggled out of China. I was reminded of Nien's account of how the young Maoists took pleasure in not just destroying people, but all of their possessions (priceless art and antiques, etc.), including hers. Kinda like the Islamists, who don;t just want to wipe out a people, they want to wipe out their ancestors, too.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 14, 2016 10:07 AM (NOIQH)

95 @56 Heh, I almost referred to Madame Chiang by her real name (Soong May-Ling) but figured that most folks here wouldn't recognize it. Same for Jiang Jieshi, although I used both names in my thesis. I really enjoyed my research into that era in China, learned a lot of things I had no idea about.....

Posted by: Pave Low John at August 14, 2016 10:07 AM (OejZ/)

96 if you think about it, good guys tell you their plans too. people listen about as much.

Posted by: Bigby's Ouija Board at August 14, 2016 10:08 AM (U0lQa)

97 Clinton won the second term because of two things:


1. The MFM was solidly behind him like they were for all Democrats but they lied out their ass giving him credit for the Gingrich congress's actions to revamp welfare. Despite him vetoing that twice they still were able to get that across because there really wasn't an alternative media yet and Fox had not really got off the ground.


2. The Republicans led off with a a boring corn State ho-hum non-conservative that could not inspire a beer party of the 4th of July.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at August 14, 2016 10:08 AM (mpXpK)

98 This makes a very good case that Senator Joseph McCarthy was right about damn near everything and is one of the most slandered men of the 20th Century.

Posted by: Epobirs
________

Ann Coulter made the same case in one of her books (I forget which one). Good read that would have been so much better without all the snark.

Posted by: FireHorse at August 14, 2016 10:09 AM (lhvb+)

99

Actually, I strongly suspect China is gearing up to do it again, on a far greater scale than before.

... and it's likely to NOT be an exclusively internal event. The surplus male population is likely between 10 million and 20 million (I've heard 40 million ... who knows?), and, while this is a small percentage of the total population, it's still at least 10 million ... soldiers ... with nothing to live for.

Posted by: Arbalest at August 14, 2016 10:09 AM (FlRtG)

100 Jiang Jieshi is a lot closer to his name, but because of the large Chinese diaspora in the states, we call him Chiang.
Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 09:45 AM (kGelp)
---
Chiang is just the Wade-Giles spelling (Jiang is the Pinyin). Still pronounced the same (Jyahng). Kai-shek is Cantonese.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 14, 2016 10:09 AM (jR7Wy)

101 Thanks Oregon and Elisabeth!

I had just put Mere Christianity on hold at the library - will add Surprised by Joy and Screwtape Letters.

It's really awesome how much learnin' is available through the Horde.

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 10:09 AM (7lVbc)

102 90 My kids read Lewis's The Great Divorce as part of their British Lit course senior year, and they have all loved it...My kids so far have considered it their favorite book from their homeschooling years.

Posted by: bluebell at August 14, 2016 10:06 AM (805dc)


Yes! The Great Divorce is one of Mrs. Muse's favorite books.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 10:09 AM (S2qL1)

103
As for #2, I don't think this is universal. I think you see this mostly
in liberals, because part of the liberal worldview is the belief in the
inherent goodness of man, particularly nations and cultures other than
your own.






No that's incorrect. The Left is only interested in nihilistic chaos. They ignore the public ravings of homicidal maniacs because they share the same goals of tearing down the old order.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at August 14, 2016 10:12 AM (LuZz8)

104 As a 13 year old who was always fascinated by last man on earth scenarios and wilderness survival , I loved Robinson Crusoe, Tarzan series and all the various mountain men books.

Posted by: Communist applogist at August 14, 2016 10:12 AM (MNgU2)

105 OOps, wrong thread. Too many windows open.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at August 14, 2016 10:13 AM (mpXpK)

106 On reading for 13-year-olds: the "Theodore Boone, Kid Lawyer" series, by John Grisham, is just terrific. Even interesting for adults. The setting is a sane, mid-sized town. The 13-year-old hero has intelligent parents, both lawyers. Each book features a very real crime/legal situation, and shows how the system works. It is not overtly political at all, but it does show in detail how our society is supposed to work.

Posted by: Emily at August 14, 2016 10:13 AM (QtkD6)

107 Eris, that's what I mean. We use a cantonese version of hos personal name. The family name is more or less the same - WG or Hanyu Pinyin (which looks weord to us because it's the attempt of Russians to render Chinese in a roman alphabet).

A fascinating period in world history, and largely unknown.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 10:13 AM (kGelp)

108 Oh, I love The Great Divorce--wish I could remember the name of the guy who did it as a one-man play at the C. S. Lewis Foundation Southwest Regional Retreat one year, but it was excellent. Have read it several times, too. In fact, there was one class in grad school where we were assigned to read Blake's The Four Zoas, but I was having trouble with it, so I looked up some secondary lit, got completely weirded out by Blake's theology, gave up altogether, and re-read The Great Divorce instead.

Posted by: Elisabeth G. Wolfe at August 14, 2016 10:13 AM (m2sZd)

109 @2
2)How did the book end? Did the Americans win?--Skip

Happy to be of help on this.
Dad walked out of Krinkelt, all by himself.
He's coming over later for ribs.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at August 14, 2016 10:14 AM (tIja6)

110 I've been reading Marked For Death by James Paterson-Hamilton. It is about the air war during WWI. It organized thematically rather than chronologically which, of course, does not allow for any story. It does destroy any romantic illusions about the Knights of the Air. And (stop me if you've heard this one) it reveals the unbelievable callousness and lack of understanding of the government officials as to the reality and needs of the pilots.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 10:15 AM (Nwg0u)

111 the 13yo could start with A Candle in the Dark by Sagan. its not Enlightenment but puts your feet right for valuing Reason, capitalized.

Posted by: Bigby's Ouija Board at August 14, 2016 10:15 AM (U0lQa)

112 But how did China fall to the Communists in the first place? One big clue comes from the book I'm currently reading, 'Blacklisted By History' by M. Stanton Evans. This makes a very good case that Senator Joseph McCarthy was right about damn near everything and is one of the most slandered men of the 20th Century.
Posted by: Epobirs

General Joe Stillwell was in command of the Chinese Theater of Operations during WWII. Stillwell hated Chiang kai Shek; but then Vinegar Joe hated about everyone he had to work with. Louis Montbatten, Douglas MacArthur, you name it. He was a favorite of FDR (and you can probably guess why) and so was untouchable. Other generals were removed for less.

Stillwell, by himself, probably had a more to do with "losing China" to the Reds than any other single American.

Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at August 14, 2016 10:15 AM (S6Pax)

113 Me, too!
Years after reading it I went to Taiwan on business, and on weekends I visited the museums. My favorite was the National Palace Museum, which is filled with art and other treasures smuggled out of China. I was reminded of Nien's account of how the young Maoists took pleasure in not just destroying people, but all of their possessions (priceless art and antiques, etc.), including hers. Kinda like the Islamists, who don;t just want to wipe out a people, they want to wipe out their ancestors, too.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 14, 2016 10:07 AM (NOIQH)


A weird fact I heard when I was researching the nood Chinese communism item is that if you ever see a photograph of China taken prior to about 1970, that photo resides in another country. You can bet on that. That's because during the Cultural Revolution, the SJWs, egged on by Mao, destroyed Every. Single. Photograph. in the entire country of China.

That's just weird.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 10:15 AM (S2qL1)

114 For a good book on how the Third Reich looked from the inside, They Thought They Were Free, Mayer.

Posted by: Vn Redleg at August 14, 2016 10:16 AM (6FZLx)

115 How did that misspelled sock reappear? Be gone.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at August 14, 2016 10:16 AM (MNgU2)

116 This makes a very good case that Senator Joseph McCarthy was right about damn near everything and is one of the most slandered men of the 20th Century.

Posted by: Epobirs
________

Ann Coulter made the same case in one of her books (I forget which one).

-
Treason

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 10:17 AM (Nwg0u)

117 OregonMuse -

Stalin did a similar thing in wartime. Control of information.

There are almost no pre WWII soviet cameras out there. Most got rounded up and destroyed.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 10:18 AM (kGelp)

118 But I guess it doesn't matter that I posted it on the wrong thread since it appears the "book" thread is not 75% politics and 25% books.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at August 14, 2016 10:18 AM (mpXpK)

119 So, my work laptop died. The hard drive has a destroyed sector, the very one used to boot up the computer. Since its a modern computer, it came with no discs, you're just supposed to use the backup/rebuild feature... which requires windows.

So I'm waiting for a check and buying a new hard drive, which means I'm using my game system desktop to say hello from. I'd write on it but I need my feet up for any extended length of time and I have a hard time writing in the office where the my brother has the baseball game on and talks a lot. Frustrating.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:18 AM (39g3+)

120 #98

Coulter's book was essentially the lite version with her style layered on a small subset of the content. The Evans book is a fairly hefty volume, though I expect the references will make up a big chunk when I get there.

Posted by: Epobirs at August 14, 2016 10:19 AM (IdCqF)

121 Thanks for reading, Tonestaple!

Eh, different people have different senses of humor.

I found "Catch 22" and "Confederacy of Dunces" and, of course, the master's P G Wodehouse and Evelyn Waugh laugh out loud funny-

only to them recommend to friends, who didn't get a single laugh.

And while I can't imagine, not laughing along with WTC, I hope you're enjoying the story and have gotten a few smiles.

Cheers!

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 10:20 AM (HGtd0)

122 Working on my own book projects this week - but making headway in John Bruning's "Indestructable" - about Paul "Pappy" Gunn, the WWII flier in the Pacific theater. The book is going to be released next month.

According to the back cover, it's been optioned for a movie - and it would be a ripping good story in the right hands. He was a retired Navy aviator, who was running a small Philippine airline at the start of the war. He was called back to service, and was flying all kinds of interesting missions - while his wife and four children were interned at Santo Tomas. It's more a novel in style than a straight-up history/memoir. The author has had to recreate quite a lot, since only one of the children is still alive.

I'm really enjoying it, though - review to be posted on Amazon when I am finally done.

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at August 14, 2016 10:20 AM (xnmPy)

123 @discobobby:

Start him off with Winston Churchill's "A History of the English-Speaking Peoples".

Posted by: Captain Ned at August 14, 2016 10:21 AM (WI6nT)

124 I've been reading almost exclusively light easy stuff lately. Westerns, mostly. Something to escape and avoid life to a place where things are right and wrong and men were men.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:21 AM (39g3+)

125 Don't know how it was in china under Mao, but in the USSR, cameras were registered and tracked. And a limit of one per household. Not that most could afford them, but still.

The red guards destroyed everything they could from the Old China. It was necessary to remove all traces of the decadent past.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 10:22 AM (kGelp)

126 Stillwell, by himself, probably had a more to do with "losing China" to the Reds than any other single American.
Posted by: Bossy Conservative....outlaw in America at August 14, 2016 10:15 AM (S6Pax)


Don't forget Owen Lattimore, commie spy in the FDR administration who helped Mao's cause immensely.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 10:23 AM (S2qL1)

127 Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 10:20 AM (HGtd0)

Yeah Confederacy of Dunces didn't get a chuckle out of me. But one of my favorite comedians, Colin Quinn is so enamored by COD that he recommends it to everyone as a life changer.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at August 14, 2016 10:23 AM (MNgU2)

128 >>..destroyed Every. Single. Photograph. in the entire country of China.

Wow, that is horrible.

Posted by: Lizzy at August 14, 2016 10:24 AM (NOIQH)

129 Read both of the JL Doty "Treason" books based on last week's recommendation. The prequel was a little bit tighter, and did set up the next well.
Though I rarely comment, I always lurk. And never miss the book thread. Great resource.

Posted by: RI Red at August 14, 2016 10:25 AM (dlYqt)

130 Mao emerges as one of the greatest mass murderers in history, responsible for the deaths of at least 45 million people between 1958 and 1962.

-
2nd to only George W. Bush. By the way, didja see that W. has attacked New Orleans again?

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 10:26 AM (Nwg0u)

131 I read a great article about film reviews and how offended journalism is taking them over - the reviews are less about the actual movie and more about how it impacts social justice, etc - and I wouldn't at all be surprised if this moves into book reviews.

The difference is that, Ace aside, movie reviews are almost exclusively professionals in major columns. Book reviews are almost exclusively amateurs reacting to a book. So while you might see the pros get all SJW, not many read them anyway, and its the "Joe Reader" review that people want anyway.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:26 AM (39g3+)

132
This is interesting, back in '05 David Mamet wrote an iconic memo to the writing staff of his TV series The Unit about dramatic screenwriting. At some point it was leaked into the public eye, and it's really a great philosophy of writing for TV or film. With some slight modifications, it could serve as a philosophy for the page as well.

One of the truest maxims here is that if the scene is two characters talking about a third, the scene is a crock of shit.

Ignore the shouty all-caps.

David Mamet's Master Class Memo to the Writers of The Unit

http://tinyurl.com/b5l27zb

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at August 14, 2016 10:26 AM (LuZz8)

133 I remember when my uncle went behind the iron curtain - this was in Brezhnev days - and all the hassles he got because of his camera.

The Jugos didn't care. The Poles didn't care. Hell, they let him mail his film back to the states, no problem.

Soviets didn't. They registered his camera, inventoried his gear and film, and checked it when he was on the way out. That done, one of the border guards casually pulled out a pocket knife with a bottle opener on it and opened and pulled out EVERY SINGLE piece of film from the rolls. That done, he tosses the ruined film back at him and resumed his inspection of my uncle's luggage and person.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 10:27 AM (kGelp)

134 Posted by: Sgt. Mom at August 14, 2016 10:20 AM (xnmPy)

That sounds interesting!

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 10:27 AM (7lVbc)

135 So after giving up my Kindle Unlimited, My plan was to buy books, but haven't yet. I havd a hard cover reference book I want but might go back to the Aubrey/Maturin novels of maybe a reference book on 19th century sailing to understand the terminology better.

Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 10:28 AM (bksJQ)

136 Ski, wasn't ignoring you. had a errand to run. Looking for the Cavendish Encyclopedias specifically. I had a set once but lost them in a storage fire.

Posted by: Tim in Illinois. at August 14, 2016 10:28 AM (WVsWD)

137 Imagine the greatest hero of your nation was also a murderous psychopath who plunged the people into unimaginable misery.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 09:15 AM (kGelp)

Isn't that what left-wing historians have been trying to do to our history, re: the Founding Fathers?

Posted by: josephistan at August 14, 2016 10:28 AM (7qAYi)

138 I do think he was right - faced with an inhuman monster, bent on genocide, only another inhuman monster could face him down. We in the west would never have been able to bleed the Reich white on the battlefield - we couldn't imagine mass battles of attrition with dead and wounded numbering in the millions. Stalin, however, had no problem with it.
Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 09:15 AM (kGelp)

You're probably right. Berlin would have been the first city nuked if it were entirely up to us.

Posted by: Jeff Weimer at August 14, 2016 10:30 AM (0KfYo)

139 Discobobby: it's an academic book (I read it in grad school), but I think it is accessible to intelligent readers even as young as your 8th grader. So, what I'd recommend is "Vindicating the Founders: Race, Sex, Class and Justice in the Origins of America," by Thomas G. West.

There's a related website here, which is mostly just primary source documents West relied on for the text: http://www.vindicatingthefounders.com

Posted by: some asshole at August 14, 2016 10:30 AM (FR8O0)

140 The Soviets would delete inconvenient or obsolete people in meatspace, then delete them from the history books. Encyclopedia entries would be rewritten to expunge traitors, and the revised pages would be sent to owners of the Small Soviet Encyclopedia with instructions to cut out the offending pages and insert the new reality.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Censorship_of_images_in_the_Soviet_Union

First Amendment needs the Second Amendment.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 14, 2016 10:32 AM (jR7Wy)

141 I remember hearing a couple of years ago that The Great Divorce was being made into a movie. Haven't heard anything since then.

Posted by: bluebell at August 14, 2016 10:32 AM (805dc)

142 Regarding the Enlightenemnt - I think one of the best introductions, in fictional form, is The Baroque Cycle by Neal Stephenson. It incorporates a lot of the Enlightenment in it's story then you can introduce the actual works.

Posted by: chad at August 14, 2016 10:32 AM (NAb7H)

143 131 I read a great article about film reviews and how offended journalism is taking them over - the reviews are less about the actual movie and more about how it impacts social justice, etc - and I wouldn't at all be surprised if this moves into book reviews.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:26 AM (39g3+)


I'm interested in this article. Do you have a link?

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 10:33 AM (S2qL1)

144 It is not merely the extent of the catastrophe that dwarfs earlier estimates, but also the manner in which many people died: between two and three million victims were tortured to death or summarily killed, often for the slightest infraction.

*squirt*

Posted by: Bill Ayers at August 14, 2016 10:34 AM (sdi6R)

145 @131. When I go to rotten tomatoes I completely ignore the critic reviews and just look at user reviews.

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 10:34 AM (7lVbc)

146 Finished a book that had requested readers from the Horde. By Daniel Humphreys titled "A Place Outside the Wild". Fantastic book. I was blown away because I read every genre, and thought I was done with end of the world, zombie type apocalypse books. This one is better than any I have read. As a first book by him, it's amazing. Want more.

Posted by: Megthered at August 14, 2016 10:34 AM (HBU7W)

147 And I'm thinking it doesn't necessarily have to be explicit instruction on Western civ (NTTAWWT), it could be novels and stories that reflect the values that made Western civilization great.

The Journals of Lewis and Clark.
Biography of Thomas Jefferson

Posted by: Real Events Trump Fiction at August 14, 2016 10:34 AM (PjWy4)

148 Anyone seen the Netfllx doc, "Making a Murderer"? I blew it off when it came out because Liberals seemed to love it, but apparently there was something to it, as one of the defendants had his conviction overturned a couple of days ago. Gonna have to give it a look.

Posted by: Lincolntf at August 14, 2016 10:35 AM (2cS/G)

149 I'm reading (and recommend) Boss Life by Paul Downs.

Mr. Downs owns and runs a small business - a custom furniture company. The book is about a year in the life of the company, as seen by the boss.

It's not glamorous, I'm a third of the way through and the company is struggling in a post recession economy, that to him, still seems to be in a recession. This is the world of Joe Everyman, getting up and fighting the good fight day after day, not the latest internet billionaire's rocket ride to the top.

As a small business owner for over 35 years, there are a lot of "Oh yeah, I've been there" moments. And it would be a great reality check for anyone who is thinking of starting their own business. If you try it, you will find Mr. Downs...very human.

Posted by: RM at August 14, 2016 10:36 AM (U3LtS)

150 At some point, a thirteen yo boy should read Starship Troopers. And then go back and read world history.

Posted by: RI Red at August 14, 2016 10:37 AM (dlYqt)

151 Pagden, the Enlightenment and Why it Still Matters. A bit tedious around the philosophers at times but broad coverage of the art and literature and politics of the time.

Posted by: Patrick Henry at August 14, 2016 10:37 AM (u+0lh)

152 OT: Maybe I'm the only one who didn't know but if you don't know about the cultural revolution in Wisconsin, check Drudge.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 10:37 AM (Nwg0u)

153
McCarthy might have been right, but McCarthyism was wrong. Loyalty Review Boards, all those kafkaesque hearings where people were asked "What is your opinion of female virginity?" etc. Fuck that.

Posted by: iforgot says God bless Fleegle at August 14, 2016 10:37 AM (5o5ek)

154 >>>He forgot the brandy snifter and cigar,<<<

What, no manservant? You're slacking.

Posted by: Fritz at August 14, 2016 10:37 AM (WYh6/)

155 i wonder if you could introduce enlightenment thought through Candide? either guided reading or so as to get him hooked enough to investigate more?

so much of it is initially a critique of so much previous stuff its hard to recommend one thing. then, a larger part of the enlightenment was wonky stuff like the reformation of prisons and asylums.... to some extent you need movies and commentary to fill that in.

another hook might be found within the history of medicine

Posted by: Bigby's Ouija Board at August 14, 2016 10:38 AM (U0lQa)

156
By the way, why are historians being given unprecedented access to the archives? That's strange. It would be like Obama suddenly saying Okay, here are my transcripts or Hillary saying, Okay, here are the 33,000 missing emails.

Posted by: iforgot says God bless Fleegle at August 14, 2016 10:38 AM (5o5ek)

157 Discobobby (am I the only one who smiles when they type that?), I don't know if you saw my recommendation on the chess thread yesterday, but if you have some time, check out Sonlight.com. It's a homeschool curriculum provider which is literature-based. They have all grades from preschool through high school.

You can find great reading lists of age-appropriate books there for your son, for any time period.

We have used many of their courses through the years, and my kids have always enjoyed them. I use their Brit Lit course which is how my kids found The Great Divorce, and other wonderful books.

Posted by: bluebell at August 14, 2016 10:38 AM (805dc)

158 135 ... Skip, Are you talking about 'A Sea of Words' by Dean King? If so, it's great and helpful. I got a used paperback copy, very good condition, for a penny plus 3.99 delivery. I keep it on the shelf with the Aubrey/Maturin books.

Posted by: JTB at August 14, 2016 10:41 AM (V+03K)

159 I found "Catch 22" and "Confederacy of Dunces" and, of course, the master's P G Wodehouse and Evelyn Waugh laugh out loud funny-

only to them recommend to friends, who didn't get a single laugh. "

I didn't like A Confederacy of Dunces or Catch 22 that much. I love Wodehouse and Waugh - but then I love Monty Python too. Brit humor (or should that be humour?) appeals to me.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame) at August 14, 2016 10:42 AM (P8951)

160 Lewis/Clark was a coast-to-coast VD epidemic. Unless you have the Fred MacMurray/Donna Reed version, it is inappropriate for younger readers in whom you have a moral interest. Plus, they never got their proofs read, and there's a major gap in the narrative due to lack-of-alcohol-ic depression.

York was a hoot though. What a guy. Origin of "Magic Negro"?

Posted by: Stringer Davis at August 14, 2016 10:42 AM (tIja6)

161 The review article is here

http://www.flickeringmyth.com/2016/08/the-most-disappointing-the-state-of-modern-film-criticism/

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:42 AM (39g3+)

162 I'm a pretty eclectic, voracious reader and just re read "Leadedship and Training for the Fight" by Paul Howe. If you don't know Paul is a US Special Forces veteran of Ops like Gothic Serpent ( made famous in Blackhawk Down) amongst many other things.

For balance I followed that by re reading Thoreau's Walden, which I believe is probably one of the best written books of all time.

Have the kid read Montesquieu's Spirit of the Laws. Everything else makes sense after that.

Posted by: Marcus T at August 14, 2016 10:42 AM (1mXAR)

163 I am currently reading The Richest Girl in the World by Stephanie Mansfield, about Doris Duke, the tobacco heiress. My husband and I became interested in her after visiting her home in Hawaii, Shangri-La, two months ago.

We had a great tour guide there, a man who knew her and was/is still close friends with the guy who was the caretaker for the home. Fascinating.

I haven't gotten very far, as the book started out with a lot of so-and-so begat so-and-so junior, who then begat whats-his-face, etc., which made for slow reading as I didn't care all that much about her great-grandparents. But her parents have finally begat her, so it should get more interesting.

Posted by: bluebell at August 14, 2016 10:43 AM (805dc)

164 The author says that not only did ordinary people know about the Holocaust, it would have been impossible to perpetrate without their help.

Scary stuff.
Posted by: FireHorse at August 14, 2016 09:35 AM (lhvb+)
====

I have never quite understood the focus on the actual murders, which did not start in earnest until the war began.

Goldhagen's major point IMHO was that the "social death" the preceded actual death was more profound. Lawyers, professors, journalists and civil servants were fired within the first few months. Children were thrown out of school. Doctors were forbidden from treating patients or receiving payments from the national health insurance. People were prohibited from public parks, libraries, museums, restaurants, the u-banh. Pensions payments to WW1 vets were halted.

Every German was at the least aware of this and awake to the logical conclusion of such policy as it progressed.

Most Germans were horrified at the initial boycott on April 1, 1933. The Nazis had hoped it would be a permanent boycott, but it was canceled a few days later because it failed. Five and a half years later, after the propaganda had a chance to take hold, although many were upset with the public disorder, most Germans understood the "necessity" for such harsh action against the Jews, who had been successfully transformed into their mortal enemy.

Posted by: San Franpsycho at August 14, 2016 10:43 AM (EZebt)

165 Harry & David went to Cornell Ag Tech just like me. Mom sends me a H & D care package monthly. Fruits, nuts & hams - like ESPN.

Posted by: Keith Olbermann at August 14, 2016 10:43 AM (o9vm9)

166 Stephen Ambrose does a great job of telling history without hating America. He wrote about many very important times in American history without either pulling punches or focusing on the bad.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:44 AM (39g3+)

167 "I've been reading almost exclusively light easy stuff lately. Westerns, mostly. Something to escape and avoid life to a place where things are right and wrong and men were men."

This is probably like asking a math major if he ever took calculus, but I still love Louis L'Amour's books. I have a big pile of them stored to read again in a few years, many for the third time. In my early 20's I could spend a rainy weekend afternoon plowing through a couple of them. They read quick.

Posted by: RM at August 14, 2016 10:45 AM (U3LtS)

168 Re: books to read for a kid on western civilization.

G.K. Chesterton might be one to try if the kid can get through. Probably will also raise his vocabulary a bit.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 10:46 AM (WV3Yp)

169 All that mean stuff I just said about Merriwether Lewis? Straight out of Ambrose.

Posted by: Stringer Davis at August 14, 2016 10:46 AM (tIja6)

170 L'Amour's books are always entertaining and fun reading, and some of them are truly great such as High Lonesome and The Quick and the Dead. He had a pattern that too many of his books would slouch into in the name of comfort and familiarity, but its still an entertaining pattern.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:47 AM (39g3+)

171 Most Germans were horrified at the initial boycott on April 1, 1933. The Nazis had hoped it would be a permanent boycott, but it was canceled a few days later because it failed. Five and a half years later, after the propaganda had a chance to take hold, although many were upset with the public disorder, most Germans understood the "necessity" for such harsh action against the Jews, who had been successfully transformed into their mortal enemy.
Posted by: San Franpsycho at August 14, 2016 10:43 AM (EZebt)

You can also not dismiss the ability of people to 'not think about it' and try to get on with a 'normal' life. Man's coping mechanisms are pretty prodigious.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 10:48 AM (WV3Yp)

172 You can also not dismiss the ability of people to 'not think about it' and try to get on with a 'normal' life. Man's coping mechanisms are pretty prodigious.

"what can I do?"
"I have a family to provide for and protect, I can't take a stand."
"They won't really get that bad"
"We can just teach our kids the right thing and protect them from this, and it will all work out"
"Next election we'll throw them out and put in better people"
"Its none of my business, who am I to judge?"

All you have to do is look around at America today and the answers are right in front of us.

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:51 AM (39g3+)

173 All you have to do is look around at America today and the answers are right in front of us.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:51 AM (39g3+)

Depressing, but yes, exactly.

Of course, as a buddy of mine once said: It always comes down to clubs in the end.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 10:53 AM (WV3Yp)

174 "Clinton won the second term because of two things:"

Pretty spot on, Vic as I remember it. I also thought the way they spun the government shutdown situation played into Clinton's popularity. All those TV news scenes of him as a lonely warrior sitting across from Dole and Gingrich and facing them down as they tried to steal Grandmom's Social Security.

Posted by: RM at August 14, 2016 10:53 AM (U3LtS)

175 re: reading materials for a young boy

Another thing you might think about is old Boy Scout manuals. Survival stuff.

Also, something someone here coined as "Romance novels for young boys"- Fantasy books Like Eddings, Jordan, Michael Stackpole, Jim Butcher (Stay AWAY from Stephen R. Donaldson!)

Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 10:56 AM (WV3Yp)

176 Aetius and CT -

We had family within the Reich when it all started. Only one - the black sheep of the family, a real character - got out.

The rest, and the relations in Ukraine, Poland, and Jugoslavia.....no trace.

Pa said his German in-laws insisted it wouldn't happen, that Germany wasn't Poland and all that sort of thing.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 10:56 AM (kGelp)

177 The Jugos didn't care. The Poles didn't care. Hell, they let him mail his film back to the states, no problem.

During the Cold War, Tito (and Hoxha, in Albania) effectively seceded from the Warsaw Pact. The Dalmatian coast was a tourist zone when I was in the UK.

Yugoslavia was an oppressive commie sinkhole, but that "iron curtain" didn't really reach that far. (As for Albania, that paranoiac Hoxha pretty much built his own curtain.)

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 14, 2016 10:57 AM (6FqZa)

178 Even people who indicate they are on the Right, think McCarthy was the chairman of the UnAmerican Activities committee.

Posted by: Joe Hallenbeck at August 14, 2016 11:00 AM (MNgU2)

179 Pa said his German in-laws insisted it wouldn't happen, that Germany wasn't Poland and all that sort of thing.
Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 10:56 AM (kGelp)

You see a lot of the same thing in accounts of the Soviet purges: "If only the great leader knew what was being done in his name!" and such.

I think it is people trying to reconcile the unending propaganda being put over the airwaves and in print with what they are seeing actually happen in real life. Given a choice between two out looks one dark, but true- the other light, but patently false- a lot of people will choose the false one because it means that they do not have to endanger themselves or their families.

The obvious rebuttal to this is that they, and their families, are already in mortal danger. It is only whether you acknowledge that reality.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 11:01 AM (WV3Yp)

180 Terlit -

I recall reading here about how the russkies were getting froggy over tito and how we'd planned to back him up, push came to shove. Our intervention in Korea showed Ivan we were quite willing to go to war, even if it seemed suicidal. Backed them right the hell off, and probably averted WWIII.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 11:02 AM (kGelp)

181 look at the Cartoon guide to the United States and the the Cartoon guide to the Universe books 1,2 and 3. Ignore the chapters on Israel and Jesus,

You should also ignore the chapter on the rise of Islam. He won't show the Prophet's (pbuh) face, which he straight-up admits is out of cowardice. Little of the bad stuff from the Madinan Period is in there. He thinks the Mosque of Damascus was built by Mu'awiya - it was actually built by al-Walid. The chapter is completely worthless.

Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 14, 2016 11:02 AM (6FqZa)

182 And as always, Jews are the canary in the coal mine. I am not trying to make a religious argument about Judaism and God's people, but rather a practical one. Historically, Jews have often been separated from the main populace in the areas in which they live. It makes them easy for every petty tyrant and tin plated dictator to make of them a scapegoat.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 11:05 AM (WV3Yp)

183 Yeah, Germans had the attitude we do now, too: they really aren't THAT bad, surely they won't go too far, we know these people, the laws will stop them, common sense will stop them, they are messed up but not horrific.

We're civilized people, we say. We don't resort to violence unless absolutely necessary and we're not there yet, or yet, or yet, or yet...

Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 11:07 AM (39g3+)

184 (As for Albania, that paranoiac Hoxha pretty much built his own curtain.)
Posted by: boulder terlit hobo at August 14, 2016 10:57 AM (6FqZa)


Enver Hoxha was always my favorite commie. And Albania cozied up to commie China, not Russia, which I thought was weird.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 11:08 AM (S2qL1)

185 179
Given a choice between two out looks one dark, but true- the other light, but patently false- a lot of people will choose the false one because it means that they do not have to endanger themselves or their families.
Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 11:01 AM (WV3Yp)


That's a pretty good explanation of why so many people refuse to see Islam for what it is.

Posted by: rickl at August 14, 2016 11:09 AM (sdi6R)

186 Discobobby,

I doubt in 8th grade your could've gotten me to read a lot of history or books on governmental theory.

That said:

"The Slave Trade: The Story of the Atlantic Slave Trade: 1440-1870"

is a huge corrective to the nonsense being taught about slavery today. A masterful book if loooooong.

"Free to Choose" by Milton Friedman is a life-changing book if read at the right time.

The free market has never been explained better and in a more entertaining way.

As a bonus, the PBS "FTC" series is online and is for a teenager just as good as the book.

Other than that, I would look to novels from the era which as their philosophical basis, though not necessarily plot, had traditional elements.

He's at the right age for "1984" and "Animal Farm".

Give those to him along with-

"The Black Book of Communism".

Things like that I'd think would work better than books that look like you're assigning him "more homework".

Posted by: naturalfake at August 14, 2016 11:11 AM (HGtd0)

187 This weather has been pulling my cork. 90s to 100 every day, several hundred percent humidity with no rain to break the cycle. And the forecast calls for at least another week of this. I'm now dreaming of two of my favorite reading situations.

1. The first really cool morning, early, a big cup of coffee, a pipeful of good tobacco and a good book. Sitting outside as the birds start to sing and the world wakes up around me.

2. A really dark day, cold rain falling and no need to go out, an adult beverage, a comfortable club chair with a reading lamp, and an old standby book like Sherlock Holmes, Allen Quartermain, or LOTR.

Heaven.

Posted by: JTB at August 14, 2016 11:11 AM (V+03K)

188 OM -

Weird, indeed. But remember the Chinese invaded Vietnam after the fall of the south. That Sino-Soviet split was real, and often bloody.

Posted by: Your Decidedly Devious Uncle Palpatine, Still Accepting Harem Applicants at August 14, 2016 11:12 AM (kGelp)

189 The reading for the young 13 was specific to the Enlightenment etc. Which is why I mentioned Durant.

Don't underestimate what kids can understand. I used to raid my dad's closet for books. That's where I first read Alexander Solzhenitsyn at age 12, The Gulag Archipelago. I thought it was a dirty book but now I think the old man was messing with my mind.

Posted by: whatmeworry? at August 14, 2016 11:14 AM (dZGNV)

190 morning morons. With the heat index, temps in the Baked Apple will reach 105 degrees. sheesh.

Posted by: vivi at August 14, 2016 11:16 AM (11H2y)

191 Codicil:
Every man should read Louis L'Amour

Posted by: whatmeworry? at August 14, 2016 11:17 AM (dZGNV)

192 This letter from 70 GOP insiders publicly supporting HRC makes me wonder what happened to those 9,000 FBI files that were stolen during the first Clinton regime. Coincidenza?

Posted by: vivi at August 14, 2016 11:18 AM (11H2y)

193 Read Chains of Command (Frontlines #4) by Marko Kloos, latest book in this excellent military sci-fi series. Early on there are interminable discussions of rank but the military venture is terrific, lot of fun.

Listened to A Dance At The Slaughterhouse(Matthew Scudder #9) by Lawrence Block, where Scudder is asked by a man to find out if his brother-in-law killed his sister and got away with it. By chance a snuff film is brought to his attention and he investigates that as well. Terrific stuff.

Read the short story The Chicolini Incident(A Rex Nihilo Adventure) by Robert Kroese, which is a comedic sci-fi prequel to Starship Grifters. Lot of fun but need more books written with these characters.

Posted by: waelse1 at August 14, 2016 11:18 AM (vZ72W)

194 Two books that are pretty good are 1491 and 1493 by Charles Mann. As their titles suggest, they deal with the Americas before Europeans showed up and after but before the founding of the US.

Some of it is due for an update, such as the discussion of the earliest human migrations to the Americas, but as a pair of overview volumes it does a pretty good job. It fully acknowledges that there are far deeper examinations of specific areas it discusses but that lets it serve well as an introduction to many areas to explore. For instance, there is much about slavery, well entrenched before Columbus, that will likely never be given a moment's examination in public school.

Posted by: Epobirs at August 14, 2016 11:20 AM (IdCqF)

195 190 morning morons. With the heat index, temps in the Baked Apple will reach 105 degrees. sheesh.
Posted by: vivi at August 14, 2016 11:16 AM (11H2y)


I'm in the Philly area and it's the same here. I skipped mowing my lawn the last two weekends because it was too hot. So of course this weekend is even hotter still.

Posted by: rickl at August 14, 2016 11:21 AM (sdi6R)

196 105 is also the anticipated high in my part of Southern CA.

Posted by: Epobirs at August 14, 2016 11:23 AM (IdCqF)

197 Discobobby, if you have Netflix, I suggest you and the kid watch Day of the Siege: September 11,1683.

While pre-enlightenment, it is based on a part of European history much ignored these days.

It's low-budget film made in Poland so the production values are not great - more made for tv level. The cgi is pretty bad.

But he might learn cool things, like that there were winged Polish Hussars.

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 11:24 AM (7lVbc)

198 I want to again thank OregonMuse and all you commenters. I always keep one tab open to my library account page and I've made several requests today per your recommendations.

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 14, 2016 11:25 AM (jR7Wy)

199 My front yard doesn't look too bad because there is a yuge shade tree that inhibits grass growth over most of it. The back yard is a mess, but fortunately it's surrounded by a stockade fence, so I'm the only one who can really see it for the most part. As long as I don't look out the window it's as if nothing's wrong.

Posted by: rickl at August 14, 2016 11:29 AM (sdi6R)

200 This is linked over at instapundit, and it is pretty interesting:

http://tinyurl.com/ho8op4d

It is the Japanese After action report for the Battle of Midway.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 11:29 AM (WV3Yp)

201 "The Black Book of Communism".

Things like that I'd think would work better than books that look like you're assigning him "more homework".
Posted by: naturalfake at August 14, 2016 11:11 AM (HGtd0)

I don't think I could have processed "The Black Book of Communism" in 8th grade. I found it hard, extremely depressing - if necessary reading when I was in my 40's.

I think the overviews of Western Civ are good ideas. Young people need to understand just what is so great about Western Civ (didn't D. D'Sousa write a book with that title? I haven't read it - maybe it's a good place to start) why it needs to be preserved. Then move on to the people who want to tear it down.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame) at August 14, 2016 11:31 AM (P8951)

202 Enver Hoxha was always my favorite commie. And Albania cozied up to commie China, not Russia, which I thought was weird.
Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 11:08 AM (S2qL1)

I remember reading somewhere that when Sterling Hayden a.k.a. Capt. McCluskey had to paradrop into the Balkens on an OSS mission he was told the whole population was riddled with STD's so he made sure he was issued prophylactics. Just in case.....

Posted by: Hairyback Guy at August 14, 2016 11:34 AM (ej1L0)

203 @discobobby : A good place to start is the old Landmark Series books . Almost all american history but by and large true to the facts . To wit 185 guys from all over, hole up in a broke down mission , get killed to the last and the result is Texas . And that is a v good thing indeed , Texas . Focuses mostly on guy stories , funny how real history works that way , with the throwaway Clara Barton thing . Lots of Davy Crockett Kit Carson : good fast paced tales from american history . And BTW any what should my kid read would not be complete w/out a shoutout for Flashman , a complete history of all the neat parts of the 19 century . and laugh out loud funny in the bargain

Posted by: jay hoenemeyer at August 14, 2016 11:34 AM (uvj0z)

204 Still on my Russian history jag.

A superb, fascinating book "East of The Sun" by Benson Bobrick, subtitled The Epic Conquest and Tragic History of Siberia. The "Wild West" is almost trivial in comparison, groups of 10-20, a few times in the hundreds, of Cossacks penetrating and conquering thousands of miles against Mongols, dozens of different tribes, and Khanates in the south. Starting in 16th century in their search for "Soft Gold", sable and fox furs. Truly astonishing feats against an unforgiving land and fierce enemies. Continues up through the Revolution and Stalin's Gulags. Highly recommended.

Posted by: JHW at August 14, 2016 11:34 AM (kn0BL)

205 I love Wodehouse and Waugh - but then I love Monty Python too. Brit humor (or should that be humour?) appeals to me.

Posted byDonna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame at August 14, 2016 10:42 AM (P8951)



HI Donna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame,

I do too.

The humor of WTC definitely leans in the British direction, while still being quite American.

If believe fans of Wodehouse, Waugh, Douglas Adams, Monty Python, etc, would enjoy "Wearing the Cat".

Not that it's exactly like their writing but, imagine them, if you will, filtered through current American culture.

Give Part One of WTC "Flaming Hoops" a shot I believe you'll enjoy it.

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 11:35 AM (HGtd0)

206 no fundamental knowledge of why western civilization is kind of a big deal.... Are there any books for a 13 year old that can help here? He's a voracious reader, so that helps.

Posted by: Discobobby at August 13, 2016 05:57 PM (0i5Sw)


Here's a link that may help.

http://tinyurl.com/jmjn84c

From the link:

Dorothy Mills wrote this excellent series of six history books around 1920 to 1940. As old editions became popular among homeschoolers, they also became scarce. As with other such books, publishers have begun to republish them, primarily for the homeschool market. Thus far, I am aware that Memoria Press and Angelico Press have republished some of these books. Titles in the series are:

The Book of the Ancient World
The Book of the Ancient Greeks
The Book of the Ancient Romans
The People of Ancient Israel
The Book of the Middle Ages (also titled The Middle Ages)
The Book of Renaissance and Reformation Times

Posted by: olddog in mo at August 14, 2016 11:36 AM (Dhht7)

207 I very much recommend Dikkoter's books. I read "The Tragedy of Liberation" for a Grad school class on 19th century Chinese Revolutions last semester and it was eye-opening. (Especially considering my field of study has been Medieval Europe so I was ignorant of most history Chinese)
The sheer number of people systematically tortured, killed, and starved for the years of Mao's social policy experiments is staggering. And the blind eye the world turned to it is incredible.
The only criticism I have for Dikkoter's books would be his heavy reliance on oral histories and the fact that the bulk of his sources (the recently available documents you mention) really aren't readily "available". They're actually difficult to get ahold of and are in Chinese. So, for the average historian, this can be somewhat off-putting.

@naturalfake "The Slave Trade: The Story of the Atlantic Slave Trade: 1440-1870"

is a huge corrective to the nonsense being taught about slavery today. A masterful book if loooooong

Couldn't agree more with this recommendation! Also, regarding the economics of the slave trade--- "The Invisible Hook" by Peter T. Lesson.

Posted by: TraciL at August 14, 2016 11:36 AM (vkvPf)

208 Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 11:07 AM (39g3+)

One difference, though, is the Germans were much more used to authoritarianism than Americans have been. Bismarck was basically a dictator. The Wiemar Republic was associated with defeat and decadence in people's minds.

Of course, the Dems have been busily working at chipping away at our freedoms for a long time, so American resistance to authoritarianism is lower now than ever. And if you import a bunch of people from countries with shitty political systems and make little effort to assimilate them....

Posted by: Donna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame) at August 14, 2016 11:38 AM (P8951)

209 "I'm in the Philly area and it's the same here. I skipped mowing my lawn the last two weekends because it was too hot."

It's not like it's growing now, anyway. At least it isn't at my house. Just brown and dry.

Posted by: April at August 14, 2016 11:38 AM (e8PP1)

210 The thing about Mao and the GLF is, we've always pretty much known the numbers was in the tens of millions.

What we have never really been able to do is put those numbers into any type of reference to what, in practical terms, had to happen to accomplish the task of killing that many people in that short a period of time.

So I think we've never really attempted to understand it, because the human mind has limits to what it can tolerate. I suspect there will be some who will attempt to analyze the documents, but I just don't expect we're going to be able to understand the scope of it, ever.

Posted by: BurtTC at August 14, 2016 11:39 AM (Pz4pT)

211 Hollywood adapted "The Visit" as a movie in 1964, with Ingrid Bergman and Anthony Quinn in the leads. It's available on YouTube (cost, $2.99). I haven't seen it; but according to the Wikipedia, the screenwriters changed the ending: in the movie, the old woman calls off the execution at the last minute, condemning the man to live among people who were about to murder him for money. It's a strong cast, and may well be worth seeing.

Posted by: Brown Line at August 14, 2016 11:39 AM (a5bF3)

212 166 Stephen Ambrose does a great job of telling history without hating America. He wrote about many very important times in American history without either pulling punches or focusing on the bad.
Posted by: Christopher Taylor at August 14, 2016 10:44 AM (39g3+)

So does David Hackett Fischer. His histories of colonial and Revolutionary era America are wonderful.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame) at August 14, 2016 11:42 AM (P8951)

213 Too early for the food thread, but-

I'd just like to say I just let the dog out and caught a good sniff of the the brisket I've got lowly and slowly smoking.

Mmmmmmmmmmmm.


A-a-a-a-nd since this is the book thread, I've just started "True Grit"-

so far it's great and exactly my kind of read.

It's made me think that after I finish the post-WTC novel I'm working on...maybe I'll do a western of some sort.

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 11:42 AM (HGtd0)

214 So happy to see Uris in the post! I spent many happy years sleeping there, trying to discover the pathway through undergrad distribution requirements.

Posted by: MTF at August 14, 2016 11:46 AM (/m8T6)

215 199 My front yard doesn't look too bad because there is a yuge shade tree that inhibits grass growth over most of it. The back yard is a mess, but fortunately it's surrounded by a stockade fence, so I'm the only one who can really see it for the most part. As long as I don't look out the window it's as if nothing's wrong.
Posted by: rickl
---------------
The only saving grace around here is that it's too hot for the city guys that write citations & warnings to leave their air-conditioned offices.

I'm almost at the point of paying a random kid to do my front yard while I'm out fishing for dinner. It has to be at least two weeks tall now...

Posted by: Chi at August 14, 2016 11:46 AM (xVSXE)

216 190 morning morons. With the heat index, temps in the Baked Apple will reach 105 degrees. sheesh.
Posted by: vivi at August 14, 2016 11:16 AM (11H2y)

I'm in the Philly area and it's the same here. I skipped mowing my lawn the last two weekends because it was too hot. So of course this weekend is even hotter still.

**************************************
**************************************

I'm in northern Delaware, and with the dewpoint so high (TV calls it 'insufferable' on their index), the heat index could be 110 today. Lawns for sure have that brownish tint to them. Plants are blasted and wilted. The other problem is the lack of any rain other than intermittent pop up storms which hammer for a short time and then run right off.

Thought there was going to be a small break tomorrow (high 80's/low 90's, slightly less humid). Not great, but bearable.

Posted by: RM at August 14, 2016 11:47 AM (U3LtS)

217 210 The thing about Mao and the GLF is, we've always pretty much known the numbers was in the tens of millions.

What we have never really been able to do is put those numbers into any type of reference to what, in practical terms, had to happen to accomplish the task of killing that many people in that short a period of time.

So I think we've never really attempted to understand it, because the human mind has limits to what it can tolerate. I suspect there will be some who will attempt to analyze the documents, but I just don't expect we're going to be able to understand the scope of it, ever.
Posted by: BurtTC at August 14, 2016 11:39 AM (Pz4pT)

Good comment. I looked up the population of China in 1950. The best number I can seem to find runs between 554 Million and 563 million. 45 million people means they essentially had a planned, intentional decimation of their population.

Simply, that would mean almost one out of every ten people you know just disappearing. The 'effort' was most intensive out in the countryside, so it was probably even more devastating in the rural communities.

Staggering how this system just keeps getting play.

Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 11:47 AM (WV3Yp)

218 IIRC, Keith Olbermann didn't graduate from the "real" Cornell University (the private institution.) He graduated from Cornell U College of Ag and Life Sciences. It's administered by SUNY and is located on the Cornell campus.

Ann Coulter used to always like to make this distinction.

Posted by: olddog in mo at August 14, 2016 11:48 AM (Dhht7)

219
I see Milwaukee protests in the news where mobs of black rioters are hunting down white people and beating them up.

I also see in this book tread, books about Chairman Mao's cultural revolution, and I'm wondering if these two items are related.

We will just have to see how bad the rioting gets and how long it goes on, I guess.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at August 14, 2016 11:48 AM (DJLf+)

220 It's made me think that after I finish the post-WTC novel I'm working on...maybe I'll do a western of some sort.
Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 11:42 AM (HGtd0)


Make sure the main character something other than a randy frontier dentist who can't keep it in his pants


Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 11:49 AM (S2qL1)

221 I also see in this book tread, books about Chairman Mao's cultural revolution, and I'm wondering if these two items are related.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at August 14, 2016 11:48 AM (DJLf+)


I do the liturgy for my church, i.e. I supply the Scripture readings. I have no idea what the pastor is going to preach on in advance. It is amazing how many times the scripture readings I choose from the lectionary match the theme of the sermon. It's kind of uncanny.

So what you just observed is kind of like that, I think.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 11:53 AM (S2qL1)

222 219
I see Milwaukee protests in the news where mobs of black rioters are hunting down white people and beating them up.

Someone punched a reporter last night. I have to admit, that didn't upset me too much.

Not many other white people live in the neighborhood where all this is happening.

Posted by: Donna&&&&&V (whitely waiting for the ballgame) at August 14, 2016 11:53 AM (P8951)

223 Posted by: Skandia Recluse at August 14, 2016 11:48 AM (DJLf+)

I have not seen your nic around in awhile, by the way. Nice to have you drop by the book thread.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 11:54 AM (S2qL1)

224
Enver Hoxha was always my favorite commie. And Albania cozied up to commie China, not Russia, which I thought was weird.


Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 11:08 AM (S2qL1)






Heh. Weird dude.

In one of Richard Hoyt's comic spy novels, Enver Hoxha had a couple of hilarious cameos unrelated to the plot at large. He would get roaringly drunk and call the Soviet Premier on the hotline, mostly to rant about lesser races, which included the Russians, who according to Hoxha's ranting all deserved to be shot in the face for the crime of not being Albanian.

These calls had apparently been pretty much a weekly affair for years, with the Soviet Premier just sighing and treating Hoxha like a disappointing younger brother.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at August 14, 2016 11:54 AM (LuZz8)

225 That Drudge headline/graphic is pretty intense. Is this being covered on TV?

Posted by: Lincolntf at August 14, 2016 11:54 AM (2cS/G)

226 Make sure the main character something other than a randy frontier dentist who can't keep it in his pants

--

Gonna be a barber/surgeon

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 11:56 AM (7lVbc)

227 With regard to the question about books for the eighth-grade boy, a think the best approach is not to preach about the West, but to show what happens when the values of the Open Society are discarded: in other words, show what happens when Liberals take over. Here's a few titles that I think he will find interesting:

"An American in the GULAG", by Alexander Dolgun. Dolgun was an American who was brought to the USSR in the 1930s by his father, an autoworker from Detroit who bought the leftist myth Stalin's USSR was evolving into paradise on earth. In the late 1940s, when working as a clerk in the US embassy, he was kidnapped by NKVD thugs and imprisoned for ten years. Solzhenitsyn praised him highly, saying he was the only man to have survived two interrogations in Lefortovo prison. His story is inspiring, heartbreaking, funny, infuriating; it's a long book, but I couldn't put it down.

"Son of the Revolution", by Liang Heng. The story of a young man who grew up during the Cultural Revolution, who escaped China thanks to his skill at playing basketball. He speaks frankly of what he witnessed in China.

"Fahrenheit 451", by Ray Bradbury. A master storyteller imagines a world in which political correctness has won.

And one positive book:

"1776", by David McCullough. A fine book about the our revolution, and the genuises who founded our nation: what we are in danger of throwing away.

Posted by: Brown Line at August 14, 2016 11:56 AM (a5bF3)

228 Do I have to have a Fakebook account to join the Yahoo Good reads club?

Posted by: F.N.G. at August 14, 2016 11:57 AM (kiSdp)

229 I listened to the audiobook of McCullough's "1776" on my last road trip. Enjoyed it quite a bit.

Posted by: Lincolntf at August 14, 2016 11:57 AM (2cS/G)

230 I bet that 13 yr. old kid would like the 4 Rush Revere books Limbaugh wrote. There's history in them most adults don't know about, and they're pretty funny too.

Posted by: Corona at August 14, 2016 11:58 AM (ragzU)

231 It's made me think that after I finish the post-WTC novel I'm working on...maybe I'll do a western of some sort.
Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 11:42 AM (HGtd0)

Make sure the main character something other than a randy frontier dentist who can't keep it in his pants


Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 11:49 AM (S2qL1)



Awwww, maaaaaan.

But...but...There goes my oeuvre!


And here I was all set to become the founder of

The American School of Randy Dentist Literature.

Dang it.

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 11:59 AM (HGtd0)

232 228 Do I have to have a Fakebook account to join the Yahoo Good reads club?
Posted by: F.N.G. at August 14, 2016 11:57 AM (kiSdp)

No.

You can sign up with just an email and stay pseudonymous.

Posted by: @votermom at August 14, 2016 12:00 PM (7lVbc)

233 216
I'm in northern Delaware, and with the dewpoint so high (TV calls it 'insufferable' on their index), the heat index could be 110 today. Lawns for sure have that brownish tint to them. Plants are blasted and wilted. The other problem is the lack of any rain other than intermittent pop up storms which hammer for a short time and then run right off.
Posted by: RM at August 14, 2016 11:47 AM (U3LtS)


On Friday when I was at work, we had one of those pop-up storms. I went outside for a smoke break afterwards and I needed a machete to cut through the air. The storm didn't do much about the temperature, but it turned the humidity up to 11.

Posted by: rickl at August 14, 2016 12:01 PM (sdi6R)

234 >>Not many other white people live in the neighborhood where all this is happening.


I have a few friends who live in the hood in Milwaukee.

Hope they are safe.

Posted by: garrett at August 14, 2016 12:02 PM (HJQI1)

235 nood - political thread

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at August 14, 2016 12:06 PM (mpXpK)

236 225 That Drudge headline/graphic is pretty intense. Is this being covered on TV?
Posted by: Lincolntf at August 14, 2016 11:54 AM (2cS/G)


wut

Posted by: the MSM at August 14, 2016 12:08 PM (S2qL1)

237 Good comment. I looked up the population of China in 1950. The best number I can seem to find runs between 554 Million and 563 million. 45 million people means they essentially had a planned, intentional decimation of their population.

Simply, that would mean almost one out of every ten people you know just disappearing. The 'effort' was most intensive out in the countryside, so it was probably even more devastating in the rural communities.

Staggering how this system just keeps getting play.
Posted by: Aetius451AD at August 14, 2016 11:47 AM (WV3Yp)


You know what else strikes me about this thing that happened? The people who lived.


Imagine all the people (to borrow a phrase) who knew the victims. They also knew the perpetrators. And then they had to continue living side by side with each other.


The extent of the damage that does to those who went on living, and then the damage that did to their offspring... it's impossible for us to begin to comprehend.

Posted by: BurtTC at August 14, 2016 12:08 PM (Pz4pT)

238 I'm almost at the point of paying a random kid to do my front yard while I'm out fishing for dinner. It has to be at least two weeks tall now...
Posted by: Chi at August 14, 2016 11:46 AM (xVSXE)
---
If you had the XM42, you could barbecue and do yard work at the same time:

http://xm42.com

Posted by: All Hail Eris, Literate Savage at August 14, 2016 12:11 PM (jR7Wy)

239 I think The Visit matches up with Hillary Clinton quite well (except for what set her odd).

I think The Firebugs matches up with GHW Bush, BJ Clinton, GW Bush, and BH Obama quite well. Bipartisan.

Posted by: Ok at August 14, 2016 12:12 PM (CRXed)

240 Since it's also an open thread, can I ask a favor? I've just realized that my about-to-be 8th grader has so idea what the Enlightenment is or why it's important, no idea of natural rights, no fundamental knowledge of why western civilization is kind of a big deal. I've failed him, but in my defense he's not here full time. Are there any books for a 13 year old that can help here? He's a voracious reader, so that helps. Wasn't sure the book thread was going to pop up...

Posted by: Discobobby at August 13, 2016 05:57 PM (0i5Sw)


He would probably enjoy Starship Troopers, by Heinlein, and might absorb a smidgen of Enlightenment thinking by osmosis.

Posted by: Alberta Oil Peon at August 14, 2016 12:15 PM (oqkO3)

241 I have not seen your nic around in awhile, by the way. Nice to have you drop by the book thread.


Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 11:54 AM
------------------------------------------------------

I have moods, and computer trouble. What with the political news, and the need for a new computer, I'm torn between getting off the 'net completely or spending money for an (unwanted) new device.

I have Terms of Enlistment in the Front line series and have read it, and based on your recommendation I bought the next three despite unfriendly reviews on Amazon.

I also bought 'We were enlisted' based on a book thread recommendation two(?) weeks ago and was disappointed. Not only did it crash my computer but by page three I had deleted it. I might give it a second chance, depending on mood.

I have enough material for a Second Taste of Imagination. I just need motivation to format it and upload it, and uploading will probably require a new computer.

regards to everyone on the thread. May your book selections bring you respite from the news of the day.

Posted by: Skandia Recluse at August 14, 2016 12:16 PM (DJLf+)

242 I thought Merkel won the prize for "leader who hates her own people the most", but apparently it's Mao.

Posted by: Yuimetal at August 14, 2016 12:17 PM (kzN4Y)

243 >>>My answer to #1 is that nobody, not even a bad guy, likes to think of themselves as a bad guy.


Yes, Mao and his supporters were at the point where they could rationalize any measure in support of our cause. Kind of where the Democrats and their supporters are at.

Posted by: Yuimetal at August 14, 2016 12:19 PM (kzN4Y)

244 "Keith Olbermann ...graduated from Cornell U College of Ag and Life Sciences. It's administered by SUNY and is located on the Cornell campus."

So that is where he learned to milk cows for a living?

Posted by: Ok at August 14, 2016 12:19 PM (CRXed)

245 Been working my way through Tom Kratman's "A State of Disobedience", which was all the rage last week or so and available for free from the Baen free library.

Finding it a slog.

I was doing OK until I go to this: in nomine Patrii, Filioque, et Spiritu Sancti. Now, I'm no great shakes in Latin and I have the mediocre grades to prove it, but no. It's clear what he's going for, but it's a swing and a miss. "Patrii" is more "of the forefathers" than "of the Father". "Filio" is ablative, as is "Spiritu". Instead of "in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost", he's got something more along the lines of "in the name of the forefathers and with the Son and with the Ghost of Holy". It should be more along the lines of in nomine Patris, Filiique, et Spiritus Sancti".

And then later: De Oppresso Liberi, which we are told means "to free the oppressed". Again, no. "Liberi" is not a verb; "to free" is "liberare". This is more like "Children of the oppressed".

There are also some formatting issued. He does a lot of flashbacks, which are rendered in italics. I found myself scratching my head, wondering what had just happened, until I realized that the paragraph just before where I had gotten confused should have been italicized.

But my problems with the book aren't all things that tickle my pedantic streak. I don't think enough foundation was laid for me to suspend disbelief far enough to keep up with federal agents spontaneously deciding to hunt a priest.

Perhaps I'm just not paranoid enough for this book.


Posted by: Anachronda at August 14, 2016 12:23 PM (Oi5b2)

246 237
You know what else strikes me about this thing that happened? The people who lived.

Imagine all the people (to borrow a phrase) who knew the victims. They also knew the perpetrators. And then they had to continue living side by side with each other.

The extent of the damage that does to those who went on living, and then the damage that did to their offspring... it's impossible for us to begin to comprehend.
Posted by: BurtTC at August 14, 2016 12:08 PM (Pz4pT)


I'm going to get willowed, I can see, but I have to post this.

The worst thing about collectivism--call it Communism, Socialism, Fascism, or "fundamental transformation"--is not only the number of people it kills, but the way it kills off the traditional culture and erases it from history.

We're seeing it happen in real time in the United States. Universities used to be the means of transmitting Western Civilization to the next generation. Now they are being used to discredit and destroy it. Our history is being erased and rewritten right before our eyes. The Confederate Battle Flag was banned, then they went after Confederate war memorials. Now they're going after the Gadsden Flag, and "otherizing" anyone who flies it.

Is it possible for a society to recover from collectivism? Germans used to be feared for their warlike nature and martial prowess, but after 12 years of National Socialism, today they are curled up in the fetal position, waiting to be conquered by the forces of Islam. America is not far behind.

Posted by: rickl at August 14, 2016 12:23 PM (sdi6R)

247 Re: 44
Schindler's Pissed?

Sorry, I'll see myself out...

Posted by: Buzzy Krumhunger at August 14, 2016 12:24 PM (jtdfL)

248 Ah, frack.

Posted by: rickl at August 14, 2016 12:24 PM (sdi6R)

Posted by: rickl at August 14, 2016 12:24 PM (sdi6R)

250 242 I thought Merkel won the prize for "leader who hates her own people the most", but apparently it's Mao.
Posted by: Yuimetal at August 14, 2016 12:17 PM (kzN4Y)


That's a good point about Merkel, but in her favor, at least she's not slaughtering Germans by the tens of millions.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 12:24 PM (S2qL1)

251 Heh. It wasn't me.

Posted by: rickl at August 14, 2016 12:25 PM (sdi6R)

252 Get your eight-year-old boy Lord Kalvan of Otherwhen, and Space Viking by H. Beam Piper.
Tell him it is for when he gets bogged down on the historical stuff.

H. Beam Piper was a classic liberal, like the French and American and British liberals who started and charted the enlightenment, and those two books reflect it deeply

They take the premises and try to put them into real examples. Granted, the politics and philosophy is hidden in between the spaceship and arquebus battles, but it is there, and used.

Posted by: Kindltot at August 14, 2016 12:26 PM (ry34m)

253 Oh, Yeah. Books.

I'm in the home strectch of the 3rd Mongoliad Book.

Posted by: garrett at August 14, 2016 12:28 PM (HJQI1)

254 #33 Barzun's "From Dawn to Decadence" isd pretty accessible if your younker is a good reader.

Posted by: Richard McEnroe at August 14, 2016 12:29 PM (Kucy5)

255 And here I was all set to become the founder of



The American School of Randy Dentist Literature.



Dang it.

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 11:59 AM (HGtd0)


I have a co-worker who was a dental assistant in this area for a long time, and she has odd stories. Mostly about dentists.

Posted by: Kindltot at August 14, 2016 12:30 PM (ry34m)

256 For instance, there is much about slavery, well entrenched before Columbus, that will likely never be given a moment's examination carefully suppresed in public school.
Posted by: Epobirs at August 14, 2016 11:20 AM (IdCqF)

fixed

Posted by: Vlad the Impaler, whittling away like mad at August 14, 2016 12:31 PM (/XV2Z)

257 #240 The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress.

Posted by: Richard McEnroe at August 14, 2016 12:33 PM (Kucy5)

258 "Enver Hoxha was my favorite Commie."

Hoxha literally banned the use of Muslim names while he was dictator. Kids weren't allowed to be named Mohammed and so forth. I worked with an Albanian who explained this to me.

That said, my favorite was Josef Tito. Yeah, he was a commie bastard , but he told Joe Stalin to go fuck himself so he had balls.
And he really did a great job of keeping a lid on things in Yugoslavia what with all the disparate ethnic groups. He died in 1980 and you saw what happened in the next decade or so....

Posted by: JoeF. at August 14, 2016 12:34 PM (Ff12p)

259 [/i146 Finished a book that had requested readers from the Horde. By Daniel Humphreys titled "A Place Outside the Wild". Fantastic book. I was blown away because I read every genre, and thought I was done with end of the world, zombie type apocalypse books. This one is better than any I have read. As a first book by him, it's amazing. Want more.

Wow, awesome. Thanks so much! Waiting on cover art and it will be up for sale soon.

Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at August 14, 2016 12:34 PM (hBeIP)

260 That's a good point about Merkel, but in her favor, at least she's not slaughtering Germans by the tens of millions.


Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 12:24 PM (S2qL1)
=====
Actively or passively?

Posted by: mustbequantum at August 14, 2016 12:40 PM (MIKMs)

261 Wow, awesome. Thanks so much! Waiting on cover art and it will be up for sale soon.
Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at August 14, 2016 12:34 PM (hBeIP)


When it is published, send me an e-mail and I will announce it on the book thread.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 12:44 PM (S2qL1)

262 You can also not dismiss the ability of people to 'not think about it' and try to get on with a 'normal' life. Man's coping mechanisms are pretty prodigious.

"what can I do?"
"I have a family to provide for and protect, I can't take a stand."
"They won't really get that bad"
"We can just teach our kids the right thing and protect them from this, and it will all work out"
"Next election we'll throw them out and put in better people"
"Its none of my business, who am I to judge?"

All you have to do is look around at America today and the answers are right in front of us.

-
Too true. And by "true" I mean true and by "too" I mean too.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 12:44 PM (Nwg0u)

263 begone, foul media sock.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 12:45 PM (S2qL1)

264 that would mean almost one out of every ten people you know just disappearing.

-
I keep a list for if the need should arise.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 12:51 PM (Nwg0u)

265 32
As the Romans would say:



Et Tu Rockus Maximus Rocke Maxime !!!


fixt

Posted by: Anachronda at August 14, 2016 12:52 PM (Oi5b2)

266 554 Million and 563 million.
-----------

Which also explains why Mao had no compunction about sacrificing human waves in Korea.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at August 14, 2016 12:57 PM (9mTYi)

267 His histories of colonial and Revolutionary era America are wonderful.

-
For wonderful music of colonial and revolutionary times check out An American Journey by The Waverly Consort.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 12:58 PM (Nwg0u)

268 Someone mentioned Tom Kratman's, A State of Disobedience," last Sunday. It's free at Baen. If you're for TEXIT, then read it. It was written in 2003 but reads like today. Prophetic in many ways. Interesting read.

Posted by: lindafell de spair -racist, redneck, sexist, bitter clinger, Moron in TEXIT! at August 14, 2016 01:04 PM (xVgrA)

269 Enver Hoxha was always my favorite commie.

-
My favorite commie was Yuri Andropov because I could say, "I hope they shrivel up, Andropov!"

I'm easily amused.

Posted by: Anonosaurus Wrecks, Now With More Je Ne Sais Quoi! at August 14, 2016 01:09 PM (Nwg0u)

270 Starting "Liars: How Progressives Exploit Our Fears for Power and Control," by Glenn Beck.

For history lovers, his daily serials are da bomb. He just concluded two weeks on Progressives, and it's "must-see" internet. His staff digs out footage of rare footage that shows leftist frauds ranting and raving in their own words.

He also covers the backstories of Prog "luminaries," wondering if some of their personal histories caused them to become the monsters into which they evolved.

The one that floored me in this serial was old footage of Wm Jennings Bryant during a nominating convention sounding like Bernie Sanders and physically mimicking Christ on the cross, to thunderous applause!

LBJ's commencement speech in Michigan was the antithesis of JFK's "Ask not what your country can do for you" and ushered in the "Me Generation."

He's got them on a bunch of topics, and they're all outstanding. I often send links to my kids' econ and history teachers for them to use in class since this is often whitewashed history.

There are pages and pages of these 10-minute shorts, and they're priceless.

http://www.glennbeck.com/category/serials

Posted by: RushBabe at August 14, 2016 01:10 PM (YeKKY)

271 If you like Sci-Fi that stretches into new territory I just started the DarkTrench Saga by Kerry Nietz.

It has a religious/techno theme and is a very well told story. As soon as I finished the first book( Kindle Prime) I bought the whole trilogy for $5.99

Posted by: whatmeworry? at August 14, 2016 01:11 PM (dZGNV)

272 Began the week by finishing Omar Bradley's "A Soldier's Story." Interesting read. Lots of maps. And I love maps in war histories. Apparently from the photos in this book, Karl Malden, who played Bradley in Patton, even mostly looked like him.

Now I'm reading "Roosevelt and Hopkins: an Intimate Journey" by Robert Sherwood. I think I bought it (and "Harry Hopkins" by McJimsey) after I read Diana West's American Betrayal several years ago. This guy was a model for the modern pols who want to spend our money quickly.

In between it was "F.O.B. Murder" (one of a box of 1950's book club mysteries I got cheap.) F.O.B. was an interesting story. There were two protagonists, and the P.O.V. changed back and forth between them, which since they had similar names, confused me the first several times.

Posted by: John Pomeroy at August 14, 2016 01:13 PM (Cqa1S)

273 204 A superb, fascinating book "East
of The Sun" by Benson Bobrick, subtitled The Epic Conquest and Tragic
History of Siberia. The "Wild West" is almost trivial in comparison,
groups of 10-20, a few times in the hundreds, of Cossacks penetrating
and conquering thousands of miles against Mongols, dozens of different
tribes, and Khanates in the south. Starting in 16th century in their
search for "Soft Gold", sable and fox furs. Truly astonishing feats
against an unforgiving land and fierce enemies. Continues up through the
Revolution and Stalin's Gulags. Highly recommended.


Watch Dersu Uzala when you get a chance.

Posted by: Anachronda at August 14, 2016 01:14 PM (Oi5b2)

274 Book thread! Book thread! Yay!

I have not only not listed any books in a long time, but have even had to stay away from the delicious temptation the books reviewed here are, so that I can work on reading for my work.

But I've taken my last board renewal for a while and I'm rewarding myself with pleasure reading.

Today just finished Cheryl Strayed's "Wild" - the book about a woman hiking >1,100 miles of the Pacific Crest Trail. She is an amazing and thoughtful writer. I found myself re-reading portions because she is so able to capture a mood/an experience in a way that makes you say -"I've felt that way too - I know exactly what you are describing."

I'm headed to REI to get hiking boots today - wish me luck. I will not be able to spend months on a trail as she did but my husband and I have decided we're going to take our middle aged decrepit bodies out for some overnight hikes.

Posted by: Jade Sea at August 14, 2016 01:15 PM (F24Fb)

275 268 Someone mentioned Tom Kratman's, A State of Disobedience," last Sunday. It's free at Baen. If you're for TEXIT, then read it. It was written in 2003 but reads like today. Prophetic in many ways. Interesting read.

Agreed. The militarization of all the various departments is particularly prescient.

Posted by: Emile Antoon Khadaji at August 14, 2016 01:18 PM (rvzMR)

276 269, I was in college when Andropov died, and some friends of mine threw a "Andropov Dropped Off" Party.....

Posted by: JoeF. at August 14, 2016 01:22 PM (Ff12p)

277 And with regard to the Cultural Revolution and the inaptly named Great Leap Forward, there are several excellent books I've found over the years written mostly by first hand female observers to the cruelty and needless destruction of these events. Forgive me if these have already been mentioned. I think that all three of these were spectacularly good, compelling histories:

Life and Death in Shanghai by Nien Cheng. Because she was a fluent English speaker who worked as a liason to the oil industry, her writing style is very accessible to a western reader. IIRC this is the book that describes the common use of defenestration to punish political prisoners. "Died in custody" often meant tortured and shoved out a window for no real reason.

Wild Swans by Jung Chang. Describes three generations of Chinese women in her family so you get the background leading up to the Cultural Revolution.

Red Scarf Girl by Ji-Li Jiang. She watched as her family was accused and her father detained for ill-defined "crimes" while she had to stoically play the role of a perfect young communist.

If I taught high school, I would make at least one of these mandatory reading. These books capture how political correctness is only a step away from oppression and mass murder.

Posted by: Jade Sea at August 14, 2016 01:27 PM (F24Fb)

278 There also was a book about one of the "Barefoot doctors"- the nearly illiterate quacks that Mao turned loose on the rural populations when he disassembled western medicine in his nation. Of course when he or the upper echelon of the party became ill, it never was a barefoot doctor that took care of them.

"Good enough for thee, not good enough for me" is the motto of communism.

I couldn't find the title of the book I'm thinking of - but interestingly enough when I search "Barefoot doctor" came across similar stories from Romania and other communist crap holes.

Posted by: Jade Sea at August 14, 2016 01:38 PM (F24Fb)

279 First Amendment needs the Second Amendment.
------------
You CAN NOT have the First Amendment without the Second Amendment, period.---said someone

Never thought about it before but there are many striking similarities to the Cultural Revolution happening here in the good old USA. Now that it has been pointed out ...yes, I do believe we are having our own "Cultural Revolution" right before our eyes. My mother was born during the original, that's why she is Taiwanese not Chinese. FWIW

Posted by: lindafell de spair -racist, redneck, sexist, bitter clinger, Moron in TEXIT! at August 14, 2016 01:39 PM (xVgrA)

280 Former spook John Schindler complains that Max Hastings plagiarized his prior writing on Austro-Hungarian military history. I haven't read either of the works in question and can't confirm this, but Schindler was really pissed off when this came to his attention.

Posted by: torquewrench at August 14, 2016 09:36 AM (noWW6)


Not so much his writing, as his original research. Historians are sensitive about things like that. In Hastings' defense, he is a journalist, not an historian, with no special knowledge of the subject in question (just like That Terrible Tuchman Woman, a phrase coined by the very same John Schindler) so he may not have realized that he was not reporting a commonly known fact (which does not require attribution), but rather citing an originally derived bit of information (which does).

Anyway, I've read both books, and Hastings' (Catastrophe 1914) was just a rehash of the same old narratives spiffed up with lots of adjectives and drama for the kiddies, while Schindler's (Fall of the Double Eagle) was interesting and a genuine contribution to the study of the Eastern Front in WWI.

As a hat tip to Schindler, however, I think I will move Hastings' book to a lower shelf.

Posted by: HTL at August 14, 2016 01:44 PM (9+952)

281 Since it's also an open thread, can I ask a favor? I've just realized that my about-to-be 8th grader has so idea what the Enlightenment is or why it's important, no idea of natural rights, no fundamental knowledge of why western civilization is kind of a big deal. I've failed him, but in my defense he's not here full time. Are there any books for a 13 year old that can help here? He's a voracious reader, so that helps. Wasn't sure the book thread was going to pop up...

Posted by: Discobobby at August 13, 2016 05:57 PM (0i5Sw)


Find old history textbooks. I'm talking about well over 50+ years old.

Posted by: The Enlightened Hat at August 14, 2016 01:44 PM (vBeA5)

282 #12 notes that there is a film version of "Warlock." It is very good and very much underrated.

I first saw it in a genre literature/film class at college. The film is very timely today, as its theme involves how much power the citizens of a town are willing to cede to a strongman in exchange for "peace" and "security."

[See, e.g., Captain America II, The Winter Soldier.]

It also features great performances by Richard Widmark, Anthony Quinn and Henry Fonda. Fonda is particularly good playing against type, as a fairly unsympathetic character.

Posted by: Darwin Akbar at August 14, 2016 01:46 PM (kXh1Z)

283 It also features great performances by Richard
Widmark, Anthony Quinn and Henry Fonda. Fonda is particularly good
playing against type, as a fairly unsympathetic character.

Posted by: Darwin Akbar at August 14, 2016 01:46 PM (kXh1Z)

He played bad guys in a number of Western movies.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at August 14, 2016 01:58 PM (mpXpK)

284 In reply to DiscoBobby (and pardon if this has already been suggested; don't have time to read the whole thread), I recommend Will Durant's Story of Civilization. There are 11 volumes but it's not necessary to read them in order. They're explanatory without being dry and were written long enough ago to be mostly free of PC revisions. The audio versions are good too.

Posted by: natasha333 at August 14, 2016 02:01 PM (1zkLv)

285 227 "1776", by David McCullough. A fine book about the our revolution, and the genuises who founded our nation: what we are in danger of throwing away.

So may people forget that while the Declaration of Independence was signed in 1776, there was still the real possibility that the revolution was on the edge of failure the same year.

Great book that convinced me that George Washington was the greatest American ever.

Posted by: RGallegos at August 14, 2016 02:02 PM (meoYc)

286 121, The writing is good. But take the olive oil bit: I'm just thinking, ick, and, she's ruining her bed completely, and, her security deposit is entirely gone now because oil in carpet. I'm no neat freak but ....

So, as always, de gustibus non disputandum est. And I could end up laughing hysterically later on.

Posted by: Tonestaple at August 14, 2016 02:15 PM (VsZJP)

287 285
Great book that convinced me that George Washington was the greatest American ever.
Posted by: RGallegos at August 14, 2016 02:02 PM (meoYc)


While my father was a WWII veteran, his was not the "Greatest Generation". That label belongs to America's founders.

Posted by: rickl at August 14, 2016 02:17 PM (sdi6R)

288 China today has hope, and it comes in the form of Christianity, which is growing in China like nowhere else on the planet, including the USA, where it is in a retreat.

Posted by: navybrat at August 14, 2016 02:24 PM (w7KSn)

289 285
So may people forget that while the Declaration of
Independence was signed in 1776, there was still the real possibility
that the revolution was on the edge of failure the same year.



Great book that convinced me that George Washington was the greatest American ever.

Posted by: RGallegos at August 14, 2016 02:02 PM (meoYc)

Most Americans have virtually no knowledge of American History at all. They get their "knowledge" from TV and movies which is negative knowledge. Hell, as I understand it they only teach it in grammar school now at child level and it has become nothing but PC propaganda.
Accordingly people think the revolution began in 1776 with the DOI. Indeed it did not. Most people do not know how close the DOI came to being agreed to at all. And it was nothing more than a letter to King George. And most of all, almost nobody outside of historians know what a low percentage of the population actually supported the revolution.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at August 14, 2016 02:24 PM (mpXpK)

290 There's that word "legacy" again. What's with these tyrants and commie types?

Posted by: Rick554 at August 14, 2016 02:34 PM (z/dJ6)

291 And here I was all set to become the founder of
The American School of Randy Dentist Literature.
Dang it.

Posted by: H D Woodard - "Wearing the Cat - Part Two: The Fox's Den" at August 14, 2016 11:59 AM (HGtd0)

I have a co-worker who was a dental assistant in this area for a long time, and she has odd stories. Mostly about dentists.

Posted by: Kindltot
------------
We had a local dentist who became known as "The Groper", before he was finally busted.

Posted by: Mike Hammer, etc., etc. at August 14, 2016 02:37 PM (mxCgt)

292 Does anyone have a recommendation for a good, accessible book on the Sino-Japanese war? I've found my interest sparked recently.

I spent some of last week reading Empires of the Sea, about the Mediterranean battles between the Hapsburgs and the Ottoman Empire, with guest appearances by the Knights of Malta, the French, and various North African corsairs and sultans. It's been very readable and interesting thus far and you can see the links between those pirates and ISIS today. Bunch of bastards the lot of them.

Posted by: J. Random Dude at August 14, 2016 02:37 PM (C9lNt)

293 For the 13 year old, I would recommend:

Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes. It's a children's classic about the American Revolution.

Starship Troopers is a good purgative of muddle-headed nonsense.

You can't go wrong with Louis L'amore or Robert E. Howard. (From the latter, especially look for "The Shadow of the Vulture". It's about the Siege of Vienna, and doesn't gloss over what vicious bastards the Muslims were.)

Animal Farm is a classic for a reason.

The Chronicles of Narnia are great. The Screwtape Letters are great but I'd save them for later. The Abolition of Man and The Problem of Pain are the non-fiction I'd recommend from C.S. Lewis.

The Baroque Cycle from Neal Stephenson is great, but might be a bit mature for him. Preview it and decide.

Any Rand is not what I'd call a deep thinker, and frequently turgid. That said, Anthem and Atlas Shrugged are ones I plan to expose my kids to. They do a great job of challenging unstated assumptions.

Falls the Shadow by Sharon Penman is a great introduction to medieval times, in this case, The Baron's War. IMO, it's her best book. Other books of hers that are good are The Sunne in Splendour (about the Wars of the Roses), When Christ and His Saints Slept (About Stephen I), and The Reckoning (about Longshanks subjugating Wales). Some of hers aren't as strong as others. Here be Dragons (about John I) is likely her weakest. It's fascinating, but slooooooow.

Another good introduction into medieval times is the science fiction Eifelheim by Michael Flynn. It does a good job of showing how close Western Civilization was to moving into an enlightened/industrial age just before the Black Plague hit. His Firestar series is also good, and largely about the value of a classical liberal education.

Flashman will have him learning history out of simple self-defense.

On the multimedia front, The Day the Universe Changed, Connections, Connections 2, and Connections 3 (all by James Burke) are available for free streaming. They'll blow his ears back.

Posted by: Luke at August 14, 2016 02:38 PM (90osw)

294 Find old history textbooks. I'm talking about well over 50+ years old.
Posted by: The Enlightened Hat at August 14, 2016 01:44 PM (vBeA5)

Exactly! When I mentioned the Jounals of Lewis and Clark,
's at thread, I meant their actual journal excerpts, not some jumped up fiction hero account. Its been over 50 years, so I don't have the book anymore, but it was written for the 1903 centennial, with dated journal entries followed by the historians explanations. I found it facinating back then at 13, and caused me to learn much geography and natural history as well. I read it at least 5 times, last time we'll into my 20's

Posted by: Real Events Trump Fiction at August 14, 2016 02:52 PM (Pby3z)

295 Author Name Lewis Meriwether, John Ordway, Quaife, Milo M.

Title The Journals Of Captain Meriwether Lewis And Sergeant John Ordway Kept On The Expedition Of Western Exploration, 1803-1806

Posted by: Real Events Trump Fiction at August 14, 2016 03:09 PM (Pby3z)

296 Finished a book that had requested readers from the Horde. By Daniel Humphreys titled "A Place Outside the Wild". Fantastic book. I was blown away because I read every genre, and thought I was done with end of the world, zombie type apocalypse books. This one is better than any I have read. As a first book by him, it's amazing. Want more.
Posted by: Megthered at August 14, 2016 10:34 AM (HBU7W)

I've searched on Amazon by title and author and bupkiss. What gives?

Posted by: RushBabe at August 14, 2016 03:15 PM (YeKKY)

297 I was an early reader. I don't think it publishes until Sept.

Posted by: Abby at August 14, 2016 03:31 PM (HBU7W)

298 296 Finished a book that had requested readers from the Horde. By Daniel Humphreys titled "A Place Outside the Wild". Fantastic book. I was blown away because I read every genre, and thought I was done with end of the world, zombie type apocalypse books. This one is better than any I have read. As a first book by him, it's amazing. Want more.
Posted by: Megthered at August 14, 2016 10:34 AM (HBU7W)

I've searched on Amazon by title and author and bupkiss. What gives?
Posted by: RushBabe at August 14, 2016 03:15 PM (YeKKY)
--------
It's a beta book that some of us "critiqued/edited" by request.' Should be out soon.

Posted by: lindafell de spair -racist, redneck, sexist, bitter clinger, Moron in TEXIT! at August 14, 2016 03:36 PM (xVgrA)

299 I've searched on Amazon by title and author and bupkiss. What gives?

Posted by: RushBabe at August 14, 2016 03:15 PM (YeKKY)


I don't think it's been published yet.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 04:09 PM (CehCK)

300 Here are my suggestions for Discobobby's 13-year-old, in no particular order:

Narnia Chronicles by CS Lewis
Anthem by Ayn Rand
Animal Farm by George Orwell
any of Heinlein's YA sci-fi, like Rocketship Galileo and Red Planet. In particular, Starship Troopers is the best one of the bunch
The Tripod Trilogy by John Christopher (The White Mountains, The City of Gold and Lead, The Pool of Fire). also the prequel, When The Tripods Came.

Posted by: OregonMuse at August 14, 2016 04:16 PM (CehCK)

301 For the 13 year old, try The 5000 year leap. Fairly easy read.

Currently re-reading Tess of the d'Urbervilles. He's rather depressing, but I love me some Thomas Hardy. Just finished The Nightingale which was fantastic despite my doubts due to another book by Kristin Hannah that I didn't care for.

Posted by: Roman10s at August 14, 2016 04:21 PM (fl2Ok)

302 So I looked at the Amazon reviews of the book and it was clear that almost every one of the one star reviews were written by someone who considered themselves an intellectual and supported Marxism/Communism. ★

The attacks were strictly on the author and his work was called a lie. Nothing to back that up of course.

Posted by: Tilikum Killer Assault Whale-Skeet Surfer at August 14, 2016 04:52 PM (hVdx9)

303 302
So I looked at the Amazon reviews of the book and it was clear that
almost every one of the one star reviews were written by someone who
considered themselves an intellectual and supported Marxism/Communism.



The attacks were strictly on the author and his work was called a lie. Nothing to back that up of course.



Posted by: Tilikum Killer Assault Whale-Skeet Surfer at August 14, 2016 04:52 PM (hVdx9)

Book reviews on Amazon are very often trash. I quit reading them. Especially if it is a subject that is even remotely political.

Posted by: Vic We Have No Party at August 14, 2016 05:25 PM (mpXpK)

304 For the boy, I suggest The Red Badge of Courage and Common Sense. Both should be about right for a 13 year old or it was for me.

Honestly, put the Lord of the Rings into his hands, too. It teaches interesting lessons between the travelogue and sword fights.

Posted by: Mark Andrew Edwards at August 14, 2016 05:32 PM (hR1Jj)

305 Yeah, I'm not alone!
284 In reply to DiscoBobby (and pardon if this has already been suggested; don't have time to read the whole thread), I recommend Will Durant's Story of Civilization. There are 11 volumes but it's not necessary to read them in order. They're explanatory without being dry and were written long enough ago to be mostly free of PC revisions. The audio versions are good too.
Posted by: natasha333 at August 14, 2016 02:01 PM (1zkLv)

Posted by: whatmeworry? at August 14, 2016 07:34 PM (dZGNV)

306 Olbermann didn't go to Uris libe. He was in the Ag school - he went to Mann Library. But I spent many hours in this room. It was beautiful!

Posted by: sailbarb at August 14, 2016 08:59 PM (MCAXl)

307 If you want to read a great book on the 'virtues' of communism/marxism/lenisism/socialism etc...read 'the black of communism'....its as good as it gets. starts from the beginning and goes through it all. all the big massacres....how they used food as a weapon...etc etc....besides of course the general 'purges', show trials etc...should be required reading in every single high school and every single journalism 'school' in this Country..but, i guess we're not in the 'truth' business anymore. its on amz etc.

Posted by: johny boy at August 14, 2016 09:33 PM (UNXWZ)

308 For those interested, Dan Bongino is running for office in Florida. Maybe they will have more sense than the people in Maryland.

Posted by: JTB at August 14, 2016 10:10 PM (V+03K)

309 For the 13-year old who needs to understand the enlightenment? Shane. Back in my day it was required reading, but it's been banned in recent years at the "better" schools.

Posted by: Haley's Buttery Biscuit at August 14, 2016 10:26 PM (f3yD4)

310 Thanks to whoever mentioned "A State of Disobedience" from baen books this morning. I downloaded it and read it this afternoon.

Beat the heck out of spending 4 hours arguing with those wackjobs on twitter.

Posted by: John Pomeroy at August 14, 2016 10:37 PM (Cqa1S)

311 Having spent 9 years at Cornell (undergraduate and graduate) and many hours in Uris library... the picture is a pleasant surprise.

Posted by: Rick67 at August 14, 2016 11:02 PM (SDC/U)

312 I can't thank the moron horde enough. Amazon is loading a truckload of books, from Narnia and Free To Choose to the Politically Incorrect Guides - which I think I'll drop on him first. He's a reader, and I'll tell him who helped guide him on his path. Thank you so much!

Posted by: Discobobby at August 14, 2016 11:31 PM (0i5Sw)

313 And Flashman. I can't believe I missed Flashman.

Posted by: Discobobby at August 14, 2016 11:32 PM (0i5Sw)

314 1)If I turned my Tablet to airplane mode would they have disappeared?
Posted by: Skip at August 14, 2016 09:05 AM (bksJQ)

It depends on the vintage of your Kindle. On the older ones, if you turned off WiFi you could keep borrowed books indefinitely (of course you couldn't download any more to the Kindle). O the newer ones, this loophole has been closed and they will delete them sometime shortly after they're due, even if the device is in airplane mode.

(Don't ask me how I know this.)

Posted by: jaed at August 14, 2016 11:44 PM (tpjae)

315 Highly recommend Sci fi: Three Body Problem. Great story partially set in the Cultural Revolution . It is a very interesting translation that seems to capture some of the insanity without being _about_ the insanity, if that makes sense.

Posted by: ZBBMcFate at August 15, 2016 03:34 AM (CKskw)

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