Sunday Morning Book Thread 02-17-2013: In Praise of Fat Books [OregonMuse]


fat book.jpg
"Does this red binder make my ass look fat?"

Good morning morons and moronettes, and welcome the overweight, morbidly obese, and positively corpulent Sunday Morning Book Thread.


The Fattest of the Fat

When I was in high school, I had a weekend job as a radio dispatcher for the local police department in the small town where I lived. As you can imagine in such a small town with not a lot going on, the job entailed lots of sitting around and downtime. So I usually brought in books to read to pass the time, and that habit, plus my generally nerdy nature was a source of amusement to everyone else. So one Christmas season, we had one of those anonymous gift exchanges, and the officer who drew my name told me afterwards he no problem picking out a gift for me. He simply went to a downtown bookstore and picked out the biggest, fattest book he could find. As it turned out, it happened to be The Source by James Michener. And it was, indeed, a very fat book, especially the paperback edition that he got for me.

But the joke was on him. He admitted it was strictly a gag gift and never intended that I would actually read it. But I did read it, and you know what, it's actually a pretty good read. The story concerns an archeological dig at a site in modern-day Israel, and in every layer, they find a period artifact that Michener uses to write a story. Totally fictitious, of course, but in Michener's usual compulsively-readable style.

Another fat book, one which that has left a lasting impression on me (heh), is the massive Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn. I first read it in 1985, the which was the first summer after I had gotten married, and I was so profoundly affected by what I was reading that it became my holy duty, and that is the only way I can describe it, to read all of it, all three volumes. I felt I owed it to the man who suffered so much to bring it to the world's attention. It was not a happy read, it was not fun, at least not in the usual sense of the word, but I was happy to do it. I still remember Solzhenitsyn's closing sentence on the last page of Volume III, "There is no law."

Reading all three volumes took me the rest of the summer, but I felt compelled to do so, and the more I read, the stronger the sense of obligation grew.

Unfortunately, there is no e-book or Kindle edition of this great work.

So, what fat books have you guys read and enjoyed?

Morons What Write Books

Semi-frequent moron commenter 'The Regular Guy' has a blog. I know, who cares, right? My pet sea slug has a blog. Heck, even AllenG has a blog (supposedly). But never mind that, what's important here is that this guy, The Regular Guy, has recently come out with his first novel. It's available both in paperback and on Kindle. Here is how Amazon describes it:

It is the winter of 1939. The Nazis and Soviets have invaded, conquered and partitioned Poland. Ed Rybowski, 21 year-old, Brooklyn-born Polish-American Jew, is wracked with guilt as he studies, safely, at Princeton among the wealthy sons of the American elite. To take his mind off the looming war, his only friend, Billy Randolph, the radical son of Virginia's junior Senator, takes "Saint Ed" on a road trip, first to Manhattan and Harlem night spots, then to Mad River, Vermont for skiing. Along the way, Rybowski discovers the dark secrets of his father's past concealed in a box of letters stolen from his mother's New York apartment, and Randolph reveals his own dark secret that could threaten his family's political dynasty.


Recommendations From Morons

Me, I'm recommending moron Oldsailor's Poet's first book, Amy Lynn, which has been mentioned on previous threads, but I just started reading it a few days ago. It's a novel about character, about a farm girl who is slowly discovering who she is, amidst all the competing influences in her life, in the wake of the untimely death of her brother. I like reading this book so much that I find I have to ration out the pages, otherwise, I'll just sit there and gluttonously read and read, like Michael Moore in front of a plate of chile-cheese fries, until there's nothing left to read.

I haven't finished it yet, but from what I've read so far, I'd give it "C+" for writing, "B+" for story, and "A-" for overall enjoyability. This is a good first effort, and OSP needs to be encouraged to write more.

___________


So that's all for this week. As always, book thread tips, suggestions, rumors, and insults may be sent to OregonMuse, Proprietor, AoSHQ Book Thread, at aoshqbookthread@gmail.com.

So what have you all been reading this week? Hopefully something good. because life is too short to read lousy books.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 10:57 AM



Comments

1 Aaaannd I'm guessin' that big fat pic turned this into a tiny print thread.
Whoever puts up teh gun thread, please don't let that happen.

Posted by: teej at February 17, 2013 11:00 AM (FVNuD)

2 Dhalgren. Samuel R. Delaney.

Loved it!

Posted by: Max Rockatasnky at February 17, 2013 11:00 AM (q1OL0)

3 The biggest book I everread was the unabridged version of The Stand. It took me a while, but it was a fun read. 1,000 + pages IIRC. I still have back problems...

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this shit. at February 17, 2013 11:01 AM (+z4pE)

4 Atlas Shrugged was a fat book. And not a happy one.

Posted by: Nancy at February 17, 2013 11:01 AM (CH3mr)

5 Re-reading the original Sherlock Holmes in Kindle format.


Anyone have a clue as to how to import ebooks from say Gutenberg into the Kindle?

Posted by: Hrothgar at February 17, 2013 11:01 AM (Cnqmv)

6 I've still got a copy of Dhalgren. Very strange book. I tend to like little books. I am reading Amy Lynn, The Director's Cut: A Theda Bara Mystery and The Intelligent Gardener by Steve Solomon. So far, enjoying all of it.

Posted by: notsothoreau at February 17, 2013 11:03 AM (Lqy/e)

7 (sorry...dragging this from previous thread)

247
>>Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this shit. at February 17, 2013 10:53 AM (+z4pE)

I had to google CABG-2. Wow.

What was your issue?...blockage?

How long was your recuperation?

I
have to have an aortic valve replacement. Still haven't decided if I
want a mechanical or pig valve. I'm getting a lot of conflicting
opinions


Posted by: Albie Damned at February 17, 2013 11:01 AM (Yhu4q)

Posted by: Albie Damned at February 17, 2013 11:04 AM (Yhu4q)

8 I started rereading Gates of Fire. It's a great book, rich and full of strange olde werdes.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this shit. at February 17, 2013 11:04 AM (+z4pE)

9 Crime and Punishment. Dostoyevsky.

It was a hoot!

Posted by: Bill Ayers at February 17, 2013 11:05 AM (q1OL0)

10 Ace's movie reviews would make for fat books

Posted by: Albie Damned at February 17, 2013 11:05 AM (Yhu4q)

11 "Reading all three volumes took me the rest of the summer, but I felt
compelled to do so, and the more I read, the stronger the sense of
obligation grew."

Same here. Solzhenitsyn's short stories are worth reading, too.

Posted by: mrp at February 17, 2013 11:06 AM (HjPtV)

12 I was looking for an e-book copy of The Gulag Archipelago just this week.

The quote inspiring me to do so is "We didn't love freedom enough to fight for it."

Still plowing my way through Winston Chruchill's WWII memoir.

Posted by: fluffy at February 17, 2013 11:07 AM (xWXuI)

13 Hey, Albie, I don't want to hijack this thread, (I do enough of that already), let's hightail it back to the previous thread, shall we?

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this shit. at February 17, 2013 11:07 AM (+z4pE)

14 Fat paperback Cryptonomicon is fat.

Posted by: Xavier at February 17, 2013 11:07 AM (kf4y0)

15 So, what fat books have you guys read and enjoyed?

You have to be more specific about acceptable font sizes. I used to be able to read very small print, as in many paperbacks, but I find myself increasingly unable to read anything that isn't printed with large fonts. This is one of the main reasons I got a Kindle. You can change the size.

I'm starting to feel like that bookworm in the Twilight Zone episode. He comes out of a basement after nuclear war, and finally has all the time in the world to read. Then he drops and breaks his glasses.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 11:08 AM (6TB1Z)

16 Anyone have a clue as to how to import ebooks from say Gutenberg into the Kindle?


Posted by: Hrothgar at February 17, 2013 11:01 AM (Cnqmv)
Hide posts from (Cnqmv)



Kindle will inherently read .azw and .mobi files. If you can download in those formats, then save onto your computer, plug your kindle into the computer with the USB cable and drag those files into the Downloads folder in the Kindle.

If they download in different formats, there's a great free program called Calibre that will convert files into .mobi and will also load them onto your Kindle. I use Calibre for all of my book conversions and getting books onto my Kindle.

Of course, this is for the "old school" Kindle, I'm not sure if the Fire works the same way.

Posted by: DangerGirl - Assault Female at February 17, 2013 11:09 AM (GrtrJ)

17 I've read Atlas Shrugged multiple times, and have skipped almost all of John Galt's 60 page speech every time. I don't think I missed anything that wasn't already said a couple dozen times elswhere in the book.

Posted by: somebody else, not me at February 17, 2013 11:09 AM (nZvGM)

18 The Civil War by Shelby Foote.

The Last Lion by William Manchester

Which lead me to reading The Second World War by Churchill

Shrugged, of course...

All are outstanding reads.

Posted by: turfmann at February 17, 2013 11:10 AM (GgGgG)

19 Been reading Amy Lynn lately. Didn't expect to like it, since I'm more of a F ampersand SF guy, but been finding it hard to put down once I pick it up.

However, there's been a sharp uptick in the error density since Amy started junior high school. School busses have air brakes, not air breaks. No matter how charming it was, I suspect what Amy found was a deer trail, not a dear trail. Stuff like that.

Still enjoying it, but the errors are starting to get annoying.

Posted by: Assault Citizen Anachronda at February 17, 2013 11:10 AM (1c58W)

20 Some of the fattest I've ever red

Shogun - I red it before and after I took the California bar for the second time. Felt it really dragged at the end but was a great read. Also was a good sign that I was going to pass the bar that I wanted to read throughout.
Atlas shrugged - one of the thickest easily. Again drags in areas but was racing to the end and enjoyed it. Very powerful.
Three musketeers and count of monte Cristo - recently become a fan of Alexander Dumas and his works are fantastic. Three musketeers is better than any movie could ever be and count involves one of the biggest badasses in history.
The stand - rather disappointing but a big novel and good at times
I could also mention some biographies like one on Mao that was 800 but ill pass

Posted by: Defector01 at February 17, 2013 11:10 AM (Is+Nb)

21 I'm starting to feel like that bookworm in the Twilight Zone episode. He comes out of a basement after nuclear war, and finally has all the time in the world to read. Then he drops and breaks his glasses.

I guess you know what you need to stockpile, then.

Posted by: fluffy at February 17, 2013 11:10 AM (xWXuI)

22
During my freshman year in HS our family went with my dad overseas, only 1 channel on TV (AFRTS), no radio, no movie theaters.
My dad bought us an Encyclopedia Britannica,I started with A and read the whole thing.
I dare ya to take me on at trivia.

Posted by: Armed and Larry at February 17, 2013 11:10 AM (geQ1s)

23 Dammit, that is supposed to be the Documents file on the Kindle, not downloads. Stupid brain.

Posted by: DangerGirl - Assault Female at February 17, 2013 11:11 AM (GrtrJ)

24 Les Miserables is very long. It needed an editor in the worst way. Still good, though. A

Agree on Dumas, but CMC was also one that needed an editor.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 11:14 AM (6TB1Z)

25

Reading all three volumes took me the rest of the summer, but I felt
compelled to do so, and the more I read, the stronger the sense of
obligation grew.

Unfortunately, there is no e-book or Kindle edition of this great work.



Check your e-mail for a valentine from me !

Posted by: Tunafish at February 17, 2013 11:15 AM (pgGli)

26 I don't know if Blacklisted by History: The Untold Story of Senator Joe McCarthy and His Fight Against America's
Enemies
, qualifies as a fat book, but it was a difficult read for me.

Posted by: boned to the bone at February 17, 2013 11:17 AM (Ph479)

27 I enjoyed reading Shogun, by James Clavell, and it was a hefty paperback. Mostly I read big non fiction books to go to sleep by, and they are usually hardcover and uncomfortable to have crushing the sternum for a half an hour.

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at February 17, 2013 11:18 AM (CTnX3)

28 Fat books:

Les Miserables- Boy that Hugo could drone on at times. The whole sections on the Penitentes or Flagellants or whatever monastic sects he went on about were some heavy slogging for sure.

Churchill's History of WWII (all seven volumes)- read during a two-year unaccompanied military tour of duty in Germany. Turns out Churchill's favorite topic was...well...Churchill.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 11:18 AM (qqZuQ)

29 Finished the Alien Taste series and started on OSP’s Amy Lynn book.




Out changing the tire on my truck in the ice and snow. Fun things to do on a Sunday morning.

Posted by: Vic at February 17, 2013 11:18 AM (53z96)

30 ACA (aka Obamacare)
Frank-Dodd
each abomination over 2000+ pages and profoundly affecting our lives, very confusiong, not a happy experience!
[oh, no I haven't read either yet]

Posted by: Saxon at February 17, 2013 11:19 AM (WDySP)

31 'Infinite Jest' by David Foster Wallace. I lugged that phonebook to the beach for a month. Not everyone's cup of tea, it's written with a self-consciously exacting precision, with sheafs of footnotes that really tell another part of the story. Anyone else read it? I think of "The Entertainment" (is that what it was called?) a lot these days.

Posted by: Lincolntf at February 17, 2013 11:19 AM (ZshNr)

32 At a low point in grad school, between Christmas and New Year's with no one much around, I spotted The Winds of War in the bookstore. Bought it and took it home, thinking to read for an hour and get back to work.

The next morning, 1200 pages later, I slept a couple of hours, went back to the bookstore and picked up the sequel, War and Remembrance, then read that in one marathon session.

I loved them, and still do. Also these books clinched my decision to join the military (eleven years before I actually did).

Posted by: JPS at February 17, 2013 11:20 AM (4y3Ko)

33 Tunafish, while you're at it, do you have a link to an online edition of Solshenitsyn's open letter to the to the Fourth Soviet Writers' Congress?

Posted by: mrp at February 17, 2013 11:20 AM (HjPtV)

34
In "boy can an English author be a d-bag or what" news:

Terry Deary, author of the children's series Horrible Histories told The Guardian that "the concept behind libraries... is no longer relevant."

"Because it's been 150 years, we've got this idea that we've got an entitlement to read books for free, at the expense of authors, publishers and council tax payers. This is not the Victorian age, when we wanted to allow the impoverished access to literature. We pay for compulsory schooling to do that.

"Books aren't public property, and writers aren't Enid Blyton, middle-class women indulging in a pleasant little hobby. They've got to make a living. Authors, booksellers and publishers need to eat. We don't expect to go to a food library to be fed."

The newspaper points out that Deary, who was the seventh most-borrowed children's writer from UK libraries last year, will have been paid through the UK's Public Lending Right scheme, "which gives authors 6.2p every time one of their books is borrowed, up to a cap of £6,600 (approx $10,250)."

However, Deary said, "If I sold the book I'd get 30p per book. I get six [thousand], and I should be getting £180,000... Why are all the authors coming out in support of libraries when libraries are cutting their throats and slashing their purses?"

Huffpo

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 17, 2013 11:20 AM (kdS6q)

35 cut and paste and paste ... it's a miracle!

Posted by: mrp at February 17, 2013 11:21 AM (HjPtV)

36 I tried to read the Stand
Ridiculous.
It could have used some editing down.
Like 900 pages worth.

Unless you're Tolstoy or Dickens or William Shirer, don't write 1100 page books.

Learn your fucking limitations..

King has been on a 30 year downward slide.

Posted by: Checker Chubby at February 17, 2013 11:21 AM (lD8ju)

37 Contra Checker, I liked the Stand, though I haven't read it since high school. Not sure if my tastes have changed. Brothers Karamazov is definitely my favorite lengthy read, if not my favorite book of all time. While I liked War and Peace, Tolstoy isn't quite as engaging an author as Dostoevsky.

Posted by: Paul Zummo at February 17, 2013 11:23 AM (81ahw)

38 @Vic,

OT, but you might like this......the lyrics are right up your alley.

http://youtu.be/QHPf0xDBAOo?t=10s

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo at February 17, 2013 11:24 AM (GsoHv)

39 I read Churchill's books, too

It seemed that they were stretched out for word count purposes. Lots of self-promotion and political payback in them.

Currently reading Amity Shlaes' "'s Coolidge"
Pretty good but not nearly as riveting as her "The Forgotten Man"
Coolidge was, honestly, boring as hell. Maybe that was his best quality..

Posted by: Checker Chubby at February 17, 2013 11:25 AM (lD8ju)

40 Also, agree on the Gulag Archipelago. I have all three volumes in hardcover and they were seminal in developing my world view. An abridged version should be required reading in high school, or at least "One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich".


Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 11:26 AM (6TB1Z)

41 @16 - Calibre works perfectly for converting epubs, etc. to mobi and uploading them to the Kindle Fire.

Posted by: Steven at February 17, 2013 11:26 AM (5p6MR)

42
Fat books: yeah Atlas Shrugged would be among the fattest, and not a happy read either. 'A Place of Greater Safety' by Hilary Mantel was a good bulky read - it's a fictionalized account of the French Revolution from the point of view of some of the leading protagonists. It goes into the Terror, right up to that rather breathless summer moment between the deaths of Danton and Desmoulins and that of Robespierre. I especially remember the description of one of the leading figures - Madame Roland, I think - going in her cart towards the guillotine, and feeling a little cold prick of rain on her neck.

But I guess the fattest book that never let me down was my father's old dictionary: 'The Executive's Desk Book', it was called. It was one of those dictionaries with illustrations throughout, and several colour plates that never failed to fascinate me. I remember one of a knight on horseback, with all his armour carefully labelled. There were Flags of the World, Trees, and I always hurried past the one of Insects. There were appendices with alphabets in foreign languages, and sign language, and flag and morse codes...everything. One of the best chapters was on how to write letters, business memoranda, etc., with a whole section on Diction and Idiom, and expressions to be avoided. Whoever wrote it was deeply sarcastic; I think it's because it was going into a dictionary, nobody bothered reviewing it and making it a little more user-friendly. Things like

"I have your letter here before me..." - Your correspondent does not care where you have his letter
"I would be obliged if..." - Awkward. Resembles the bow of a fourth-level declaimer
"nolens volens...nil desperandum...etc." - It is more courteous to use English, the language of your corresspondent

I must try to find another copy of that book; I've never found another dictionary I enjoyed more.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at February 17, 2013 11:26 AM (FkH4y)

43 Tunafish, while you're at it, do you have a link to
an online edition of Solshenitsyn's open letter to the to the Fourth
Soviet Writers' Congress?

Posted by: mrp at February 17, 2013 11:20 AM (HjPtV)

Sorry,no.I do have Ivan Denisovich and In The First Circle though if you want.

Posted by: Tunafish at February 17, 2013 11:26 AM (pgGli)

44 While I liked War and Peace, Tolstoy isn't quite as engaging an author as Dostoevsky.

Posted by: Paul Zummo at February 17, 2013 11:23 AM (81ahw)




Did you know the original title for “War and Peace” was “War—What Is It Good For?”! Tolystoy's mistress didn’t like the title and insisted him change it to “War and Peace”!

Posted by: Jerry Seinfeld at February 17, 2013 11:27 AM (X6akg)

45 Read Bram Stoker's "Dracula" in high school, for kicks on my own time, because, ya know, VAMPIRES!

Barnabas Collins in "Dark Shadows" every afternoon on the tube was far superior.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 11:27 AM (4Mv1T)

46 Ditto the OP on the Gulag Archipelago.

The Count of Monte Cristo, unabridged, has been one of the most enjoyable fat books I've ever read. In the non-fiction area, Shelby Foote's three volume set on the Civil War is incredible.

Posted by: SARDiver at February 17, 2013 11:27 AM (U22vg)

47 I found a major chain bookstore in Spokane last weekend that had a great used and discounted section. Picked up a copy of Vernor Vinge's "Zones of Thought." it's actually a 2 in 1 volume with the book being the original and sequel. VV has wrote a lot of interesting SF and this is no different. At 970 pages of regular sized font and trade binding it was a big, honking steal at $7.99.

Posted by: Pecan Scandi at February 17, 2013 11:28 AM (Ruc3J)

48 Atlas. Loved it but found it repetitive. Liked the pace of Fountainhead better. Just finished In Cold Blood. Took longer than I thought it would to read. Can't seem to finish Wealth of Nations or The Prince, which doesn't qualify as big book, but has been a giant pain in arse.

Posted by: scampydog at February 17, 2013 11:28 AM (FKmaT)

49 I'd like to second Gates of Fire. I go back and read that every few years.

Another decent fat book is Swan Song (http://bit.ly/XH7gw7).


Posted by: ElKomandante at February 17, 2013 11:28 AM (w9frw)

50 Regarding OSP's book-

I think there is a subtle and, at the same time, substantial difference between writing and story-telling. I too noticed some of the typographical errors, things a good editor or copy-reader should pick up and correct. But the story is a good one and the telling of it by OSP is nicely done.

I don't consider myself a writer in the sense of "I must write", or "writing is what I do". The Seamus Muldoon story was such a compelling story to me that it just kind of wrote itself. I doubt that I will ever write another. I think OSP has taken story elements and crafted a story that begs to be read once you start. Hence the discrepancy in grades from Oregon Muse. The ability to tell a story is the key to being a writer, and I think he pulled it off.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 11:28 AM (qqZuQ)

51 Edward Rutherfurd's historical novels:

http://www.amazon.com/Edward-Rutherfurd/e/B000AQ11FC

Posted by: ChampionCapua at February 17, 2013 11:29 AM (KZi9D)

52 Did you know the original title for “War and Peace” was
“War—What Is It Good For?”! Tolystoy's mistress didn’t
like the title and insisted him change it to “War and Peace”!


That's because you left out the "HUH!" Hit a bit to close to home for her.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 11:29 AM (6TB1Z)

53
@17
Yep. I think I read Galts big speech the first time I read Atlas Shrugged.... haven't read the speech in the dozen times or so since. Still a great book, it nails the moochers/takers/socialists/progressives/democrats to a T.

Posted by: Some Guy in Wisconsin at February 17, 2013 11:29 AM (LMtDw)

54 Battlefield Earth, by L. Ron Hubbard. (1,000+ pg paperback)

I think I was around 13 at the time, and it was fun.
But at 13, who recognizes shallow in a book if it's fast and fun.


Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 17, 2013 11:30 AM (bTPOR)

55 Can't seem to finish Wealth of Nations

I forgot about that one. You're right, it's a doorstop, but I'm glad I got through it. Same for "Democracy in America".

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 11:30 AM (6TB1Z)

56 "Sorry,no.I do have Ivan Denisovich and In The First Circle though if you want."

Thanks. I have both in hard copy and some other stuff. I gave away "The Oak And The Calf" to a friend (sigh). I think there was a copy of the Letter in that book. Stirring stuff, it should be online.

Posted by: mrp at February 17, 2013 11:31 AM (HjPtV)

57 Just finished up the Repairman Jack series.

Not pleased. The author's "I need to move on" foreward was BS too.

Posted by: nip at February 17, 2013 11:31 AM (11Tdq)

58 I was stunned to learn that someone else had been stubborn enough to fight their way all the way through "The Source"!

Posted by: OldDog at February 17, 2013 11:31 AM (tQYJH)

59 tried to read the Stand
Ridiculous.
It could have used some editing down.
Like 900 pages worth.

Unless you're Tolstoy or Dickens or William Shirer, don't write 1100 page books.

Posted by: Checker Chubby at February 17, 2013 11:21 AM (lD8ju)







Especially if most of your villains are Randall Flagg or evil space aliens. Seriously, that's like 80% of his output.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at February 17, 2013 11:32 AM (MBqvE)

60 Which version of The Stand? The original shorter version? Or the later updated that has a Stephen King size weight problem?

Plowed through a few thick books. Like 'Rainbow Six' or 'Oath of Fealty.' Or do you mean the Michael Moore super-size me types?

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 11:32 AM (7tbEC)

61
I must try to find another copy of that book; I've never found another dictionary I enjoyed more.
Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at February 17, 2013 11:26 AM (FkH4y)



http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000NZ93EG/ref=dp_olp_used?ie=UTF8&condition=used

Posted by: ChampionCapua at February 17, 2013 11:32 AM (KZi9D)

62 Pep

I didn't know that the 70s group "War" wrote War and Peace..

Posted by: Checker Chubby at February 17, 2013 11:33 AM (lD8ju)

63 Read the first 10 pages of "Dianetics" by L. Ron Hubbard in the mid 80's due to, well, good TV advertising.

After page 10 I said, "This is complete and utter bullshit". It then became a carpet saver under the kickstand of my HD which was then parked in the dining room.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 11:34 AM (4Mv1T)

64 Pep

I didn't know that the 70s group "War" wrote War and Peace..
Posted by: Checker Chubby at February 17, 2013 11:33 AM (lD8ju)







No, that was Brian Dennehy.

Posted by: IllTemperedCur at February 17, 2013 11:34 AM (MBqvE)

65 Sorry Pep
You beat me to it..

Posted by: Checker Chubby at February 17, 2013 11:34 AM (lD8ju)

66 Fat books: The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham; two of the three Stieg Larsson books.

Posted by: Northern Lurker at February 17, 2013 11:36 AM (sCK+c)

67 #49, ElKomandante, I agree... Swan Song, Robert R. McCammon. Excellent read.

Posted by: JenBee at February 17, 2013 11:36 AM (QBMA5)

68 However, Deary said, "If I sold the book I'd get 30p per book. I get six [thousand], and I should be getting £180,000... Why are all the authors coming out in support of libraries when libraries are cutting their throats and slashing their purses?"
Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 17, 2013 11:20 AM (kdS6q)

*******


Supply and demand baby, supply and demand. Cry me a river Ms. (or is it Mr.) Deary.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 11:37 AM (qqZuQ)

69 Fat book recommendations: these tend to be historical fiction

Far Pavilions, Shadow of the Moon. MM Kaye. India/ raj
Gone With the Wind
Any Michener book: I liked Hawaii, The Source, The Drifters
Winds Of War/ War and Remembrance H. Wouk
Shogun, Noble House J Clavell
Anna Karenina
The Stand

Odd that most of these are circa high school and college for me, and are goto retreads, muliple times. Are ourtastes in books pretty much frozen in time up to your early 20s like music?

Posted by: Goldilocks at February 17, 2013 11:37 AM (/y6zs)

70 The thing about 'Amy Lynn' is the story. Once you are hooked the brain automatically corrects the goofs. And it is very easy to get hooked by the story.

In the writers group that I used to belong to before our hangout closed. We were all pretty nice folk who could offer good suggestions to fix things in each other's stories. But the one person I dreaded was the poet, at the drop of a passive voice he would clamber upon Roscinante to rail against that windmill once more. Ugh.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 11:38 AM (7tbEC)

71 Actually enjoyed "Les Miserable" immensely, which is great because I only read because the sophomore English prof required it.

Can't imagine actually plowing through the original multi-volume, Encyclopedia Brittanica, unabridged version.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 11:39 AM (4Mv1T)

72 Just finished another Nero Wolfe mystery, "The League of Frightened Gentlemen". I liked it of course, a typical Wolfe story. It's a kick to read the "hard-bitten" dialogue from the Thirties. Started the audio book of The Golden Compass, a book that became a "must read" for young adults after I was already an old adult.

Posted by: Lincolntf at February 17, 2013 11:39 AM (ZshNr)

73 Tobacco Road.

Dianetics, even at my then age seemed hookey.
And once I moved past Battlefield Earth to the next one in the series, I was able to see Hubbard, and his lack of writing skills in a more accurate light.

Unfortunately, as I got older, my WPM rate went up.
On the order of a Ludlum paperback, and a twelve pack of beer would be a good work night evening of fun.
Couldn't afford both beer and books, so something had to give.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 17, 2013 11:39 AM (bTPOR)

74 After page 10 I said, "This is complete and utter bullshit". It then became a carpet saver under the kickstand of my HD which was then parked in the dining room.
Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 11:34 AM (4Mv1T)

*********

Sounds like good use of bad literature. Have to ask though- what was the motorcycle doing in the dining room?

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 11:40 AM (qqZuQ)

75 "I was stunned to learn that someone else had been stubborn enough to fight their way all the way through "The Source"!"

I read it when I was in the ninth grade. I read all of Michiner's door-stoppers through "Centennial", including "The Drifters". I might read "Iberia" (non-fiction) again during the next bout of winter storm.

Posted by: mrp at February 17, 2013 11:40 AM (HjPtV)

76 ...On the order of a Ludlum paperback

I loved his stuff. Actually made time between chasing womyns and booze as a bachelor to read much of his stuff.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 11:42 AM (4Mv1T)

77 Reading Reamde right now. Very good but different than I thought it would be. Read The Passage and Anathem last summer. Also great books. About 10-12 years ago I read An Instance of the Fingerpost which was really really good also.

Posted by: Jack Burton Mercer at February 17, 2013 11:42 AM (7NgYX)

78 63 Read the first 10 pages of "Dianetics. Same here & same with Celestine Prophesy-someone handed it to me in the airport.. About 5 pages read & left it in the seat back pocket for the next poor bastige

Posted by: scampydog at February 17, 2013 11:42 AM (FKmaT)

79 Instance of the Fingerpost, great read.

Posted by: Lincolntf at February 17, 2013 11:43 AM (ZshNr)

80 Read and enjoyed all these, except as noted: Wealth of Nations, History of the English Speaking People, Rise and Fall of the Roman Empire, Shogun (Noble House- did not like), War and Peace, Joan of Arc (Twain), Gulag Archipelago, The Bible.

Posted by: Mr. Dave in SPI at February 17, 2013 11:43 AM (xiaOm)

81 a passive voice he would clamber upon Roscinante to rail against that windmill once more. Ugh.
Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 11:38 AM (7tbEC)

*******

Let me touch that up- you should have written:

Roscinante would be clambered upon in order that the windmillsmight be the object of railing once more.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 11:43 AM (qqZuQ)

82 While I liked War and Peace, Tolstoy isn't quite as engaging an author as Dostoevsky.

Posted by: Paul Zummo at February 17, 2013 11:23 AM (81ahw)


Different people, different tastes...

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 17, 2013 11:43 AM (Vo6Ep)

83 LOL Seamus!!!!

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 11:44 AM (7tbEC)

84 On the topic of large books: Don Quixote

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 17, 2013 11:44 AM (Vo6Ep)

85 "Sounds like good use of bad literature. Have to ask though- what was the motorcycle doing in the dining room?"

I would like "Places to keep your motorcycle when you have a small living room" for $200.00 please

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 17, 2013 11:45 AM (bTPOR)

86 Footfall, by Niven and Pournell. Meaty, but not morbidly obese. I love that the happy ending involves every sort of nuke imaginable.

Posted by: Rule #2 at February 17, 2013 11:45 AM (CypDC)

87 Fat Book: Paul Prudhomme's Louisiana Kitchen.

Every single damn thing is made with butter, cream, a bit of flour and butter.
You too will need a "powered chair" with a mega-load rating.

Posted by: Clutch Cargo at February 17, 2013 11:45 AM (Qxdfp)

88 Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson is good and wordy.

Posted by: Frankly at February 17, 2013 11:45 AM (SzY9C)

89 Especially if most of your villains are Randall Flagg or evil space aliens. Seriously, that's like 80% of his output.

And 80% of your setups revolve around a whimsical childhood story in Bangor, Maine.

I remember being a kid and always hearing how Stephen King was the best writer ever, his stories so scary, etc etc. Finally got old enough to read a couple books and was underwhelmed. I'm nowhere near qualified to critique someone who has sold a billion copies of his books, but King isn't for me.

Anyone got any recommendations in the following categories?

1. Mind-blowing space and universe
2. Rise of communism and socialism in Europe

Posted by: ElKomandante at February 17, 2013 11:45 AM (w9frw)

90 >>>Have to ask though- what was the motorcycle doing in the dining room

Slightly OT, but I had a fairly well decorated town-home for a bachelor type. I brought the new HD in the house in the winter to protect it from thieves, plus it looked damn good just sitting there. Hell'uva conversation piece.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 11:46 AM (4Mv1T)

91 Hmmm, so much for doing a search without actually reading what's been posted...

Posted by: Captain Hate at February 17, 2013 11:46 AM (Vo6Ep)

92 American Caesar" Douglas MacArthur by William Mancheser. Somehow, in 793 pages, the author found no room to criticize "the General".
.
Skip that bio.

Posted by: Die Trying at February 17, 2013 11:46 AM (w7J/R)

93 I read Herman Wouk's "Winds of War" and "War and Remembrance" a couple of months ago - right before I "inherited" my husband's Kindle (Santa brought him a new one for Christmas).

Really wish that Amazon would offer some sort of deal where you could get the Kindle version at a reduced rate if you recently purchased a hard copy.....

.....I read so fast that my husband is afraid I'm gonna bankrupt us buying Kindle titles now :-)

Posted by: Teresa in Fort Worth, TX at February 17, 2013 11:46 AM (ADnWI)

94 I felt the same way about "Gulag Archipeligo". I used to see it on dad's bookshelf and think " what the heck is that? A foreign book? " one day I took it down and started reading. Wow..... It is hard to believe what people can do to each other. At age 14 I knew all about Hitler and the Nazis, never heard of the Gulags. My mind was blown. Years later my son read it.
Right now I have all three volumes on my Iphone. I use Stanza to read them. Sorry I can't remember where I even found them, but I know I googled and found them all for free without much trouble. I am reading them all again to get ready for Obama 2016.
Check out a song from Al Stewart called "Roads to Moscow".......
"How could we readily believe that the Western allies had entered this war not for the sake of freedom in general, but for their own Western European freedom, only against Nazism, intending to take full advantage of the Soviet armies and leave it at that? Was it not more natural for us to believe that our allies were true to the very principle of freedom and that they would not abandon us to a worse tyranny?... True, these were the same allies for whom Russians had died in the First World War, and who then, too, had abandoned our army in the moment of collapse, hastening back to their comforts. But this was a lesson too cruel for the heart to learn.
All this was in 1949 (the year one thousand nine hundred and forty-nine), the thirty-second year after the October Revolution, four years after the war, with its harsh imperatives, had ended, three years after the conclusion of the Nuremberg Trials, where mankind at large had learned about the horrors of the Nazi campsand said with a sigh of relief: "It can never happen again." "
We let it go on.

Posted by: Duck Fupp at February 17, 2013 11:47 AM (J63yQ)

95 Normally just lurk here, but your comments about the Gulag perfectly described me. After reading the first volume, I thought, "this is terrible!" Then I got through volume two. "Could anything be worse than this?" That's when I discovered the third volume! Monumental work, to be sure!

If the thought of three thick tomes scares one off, there is his much shorter work, A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich, which, while barely scratching the surface, still gives an idea of just how evil the Soviet system became.

I was a serious nerd in high school - even had an after-school job at the public library. Some of the major works I've read (or wrestled with) include half of Michner's repitoire, Don Quixote de la Mancha (in English), Dostoyevsky's Crime and Punishment and Brothers Karmazov, Tolstoy's Anna Karenina, Josephus, Eusebius, etc.

Posted by: Ace O'Dale at February 17, 2013 11:47 AM (yHbsV)

96 I think Shogun is the fattest that I have read.

Posted by: sTevo at February 17, 2013 11:48 AM (VMcEw)

97 "1Q84" is fat and has started well.

Posted by: President Herp Derp at February 17, 2013 11:48 AM (X/+QT)

98
Read the first 10 pages of "Dianetics" by L. Ron Hubbard in the mid 80's due to, well, good TV advertising.

After page 10 I said, "This is complete and utter bullshit". It then became a carpet saver under the kickstand of my HD which was then parked in the dining room.


Same here, but I got through the first couple of chapters before I arrived at that decision. What a crock. And anyone who claimed to follow him or his teachings was automatically suspect. On the plus side, it taught me a lot about group dynamics (the cult, not the book itself) and the power of BS and gullibilityismness.

P. T. Barnum was right, as was Cmdr. E. Ripley.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this shit. at February 17, 2013 11:48 AM (+z4pE)

99 King's The Stand. Neil Stevenson's Cryptonomicon was great and I'm almost done with his latest, REAMDE, which is also fat. I was unable to get through his fat Baroque Cycle books but am taking a stab at them again on a cruise next week. And then there's the ultimate fat book, The Bible.

Posted by: MostlyRight at February 17, 2013 11:48 AM (w9AQ4)

100 Oh yea, would like to also second Man in the Iron Mask. That was a great read.

Great skinny book: The Law by Bastiat. You can get it free now days. Most of you have probably read it already, but if not, go get it. I found it in my stocking one year and loved it.

Posted by: ElKomandante at February 17, 2013 11:48 AM (w9frw)

101 My vote for the best fat book (s) would be Shelby Foote's "The Civil War." Even though you know how the story goes and its ending, Foote's novelist's knack of building plot and description is paramont. For almost 3,000 pages, thetale never lags.

Posted by: Libra at February 17, 2013 11:50 AM (cMWZ+)

102
I've become addicted to my Kindle. I can download an entire shelf of an author's work in about fifteen seconds. Plowed through Kipling and Sherlock Holmes, working my way through Mark Twain, and have George McDonald waiting in the wings. All of these can be had in good versions for only a few bucks (don'tget thefree ones, they're worth what you pay).
I've got the complete Nero Wolfe series, all of Terry Pratchett, and many others.
My only complaint is that publishers treat electronic versions of old reprints kind of badly, turning them out with typos and obvious OCR mistakes.
My other complaint is that a lot of my old favorites aren't even available on Kindle.
I've even generated my own Kindle books for young readers. One of them has been published on Amazon ("Castle Falcon"). Others I've moved to my Kindle for proofing by simply e-mailing the .mobi file to my Kindle address. Tools I use include Adobe InDesign and Amazon's Kindle plug-in for it, and Calibre.

Posted by: TB at February 17, 2013 11:50 AM (0Ez44)

103 Neal Stephenson...double auto-incorrect!

Posted by: MostlyRight at February 17, 2013 11:51 AM (w9AQ4)

104 about a farm girl who is slowly discovering who she is,

So.....penthouse forum then?


Posted by: Guy Mohawk at February 17, 2013 11:51 AM (p/cQy)

105 Mailer's Harlot's Ghost wasn't as bad as it seemed, topping out at 1100+ pages, but there are times that the editor, should step in,

Posted by: archie goodwin at February 17, 2013 11:51 AM (Jsiw/)

106 2. Rise of communism and socialism in Europe
Posted by: ElKomandante at February 17, 2013 11:45 AM (w9frw)

*******

FA Hayek- Road to Serfdom

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 11:52 AM (qqZuQ)

107 Clavell's "Tai Pan" was enjoyable. "Noble House" not so much.

Posted by: mrp at February 17, 2013 11:53 AM (HjPtV)

108 A shameless plug for an old surfing friend. He'd be a moron if he could operate a computer. Since they don't put them on surfboards that's not happening any time soon.

Couchesthentics: The exercise book for people who never exercise.
http://tinyurl.com/b6ttben
If you saw Bob, you'd take it seriously.
I hope I'm in that sort of shape by his age.
Knowing him I thought it was a joke - then a joke book - but it's neither.

Posted by: Clutch Cargo at February 17, 2013 11:54 AM (Qxdfp)

109 Got bored at the height of the recession and read all of the Sherlock Holmes installments from my dad's original 1920's hard bound volumes. Really yellowed paper, small pale print. Tough read in that condition. I think it explains my miserable eyesight now.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 11:54 AM (4Mv1T)

110 I do appreciate getting the Kindle "Daily Deals" and "Monthly Deals", as I occasionally find something I never would have known about/thought to read otherwise. And of course, you fine people always have great suggestions as well.

I love the Information Age!

Posted by: Teresa in Fort Worth, TX at February 17, 2013 11:54 AM (ADnWI)

111 I liked Harlot's Ghost a lot, still hate Mailer for not writing the promised sequel.

Posted by: Lincolntf at February 17, 2013 11:54 AM (ZshNr)

112
I agree that King's The Stand is lame. The premise was done much better in the fat book "Swan Song" by Robert McCammon.
Other great FAT books:
The Wheel of Time series
Anything by Peter F. Hamilton (especially the Night's Dawn trilogy..really twisted concepts there)
Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by Manchester
Honorable Mention:
Malazan Book of the Fallen series by Steven Erikson. Very fat, but I suspect it needed some serious editing...

Posted by: ObamaPelosiBidenReid SubHuman Centipede Ouroboros at February 17, 2013 11:56 AM (0/Hwb)

113 Rise and Fall of the Third Reich

Fattest best seller ever!

Posted by: Checker Chubby at February 17, 2013 11:56 AM (lD8ju)

114
>>>My vote for the best fat book (s) would be Shelby Foote's "The Civil War."

I think I'd like this best, despite the length, if I could hear him read it aloud. Alas.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 11:56 AM (4Mv1T)

115 FA Hayek- Road to Serfdom

Thank you good sir.

Posted by: ElKomandante at February 17, 2013 11:56 AM (w9frw)

116 Best fat book? Mark Helprin's "A Soldier of the Great War" is the best novel I've evr read, period. It checked in at nearly 1,000 pages, and I felt great regret when I neared the end.

Posted by: Wolfram & Hart at February 17, 2013 11:57 AM (TsIdQ)

117 FWIW, very few of Michener's books are on Kindle; can't find Robin Cook's books out there, either (I'd like to re-read "Coma" - enjoyed it back in HS).

Posted by: Teresa in Fort Worth, TX at February 17, 2013 11:58 AM (ADnWI)

118 Started Paul Zummo's "Dirty Laundry". There's already been quite a few lolz and he obviously had *a lot* of fun coming up with some of the characters' names.

Otherwise, several e-books on soapmaking and other natural beauty/spa items, and getting up-to-date on the webcomic "Freefall".

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette, assault Hobbit at February 17, 2013 11:58 AM (UBC8/)

119 Duck:

My son used Roads to Moscow as a spoken poem in 4th grade. Teacher didn't like it, but it had everything that would interest a young man, and taught several valuable lessons too.

Posted by: Jinx the Cat at February 17, 2013 11:58 AM (CTnX3)

120 Fattest book on earth - Ubingacare and all the referenced books therein.

Posted by: Whatev at February 17, 2013 11:58 AM (A7Wh1)

121 Ithought that book was called "The Tell"

Posted by: Bradf at February 17, 2013 11:59 AM (c31hn)

122 Winter of the World - the series is great

Posted by: Mitch Rapp at February 17, 2013 11:59 AM (OPdNV)

123 Kinda neat and meaty books on going to Mars

Jack Williamson's 'Beachhead' - 368 pages
http://tinyurl.com/at8frv3

John Varley's 'Red Thunder' - 411 pages
http://tinyurl.com/a3xopbz

Or maybe something from Dr. Travis Taylor, star of Rocket City Rednecks' and author - 'A New American Space Plan.'
http://tinyurl.com/atbpblg

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 11:59 AM (7tbEC)

124 As no one mentioned any of the Wheel Of Time books. Some were disappointingly odd, but the last was awesome.

Posted by: Comrade Trainer on his Iphone at February 17, 2013 11:59 AM (L8M3D)

125 I'm seeing a lot of literary masochism on this thread.

Posted by: Soona at February 17, 2013 12:00 PM (AC0O2)

126 I am reading (in chronological order and not published order) the Recluce series by L.E. Modesitt.

It's now up to 15 books and covers a time frame of about 2k years from the first landing of the "Rationalists" to the demise of their degenerate progeny the White Mages.

Interesting examples of empire and those who create them, destroy them and those that temporarily revitalize them despite their inevitable decay.

Also how a rational and reasoned science can become a ritualized religion and the basis for Empire.

Add in the various human weaknesses and hubris and it's a decent study of how bad things can happen to good people and sometimes they deserve it.

Recommended for those who appreciate indepth writing.

Start with the "Magi'i of Cyador" and not the published start of the series "The Magic of Recluce".

It relates the beginning of the end of a technologically advanced (for the planet they're on) empire created by a Multiple Star Empire's colonials (castoffs due to mishap or on perhaps isn't made clear) an how the inevitable end is struggled against and the rise of a Emperor who understands what's going to happen and doesn't try to hide from the inevitable. (most of THAT happens in "The Scion of Cyador" the next in the series.

So does is the size of an individual volume the deciding factor or the size of the series?

I also just finished rereading the Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan (finished in January in time to read the final volume just published and issued on January Also another good read with a lesser emphasis on magic powers than many contemporary series do. (The Cyador series also is like that. It's more the magic of advanced science than a magic of improbable power exerted without cost, effort or knowledge)


Posted by: Bitter Clinger (aka Ol' 3 tooth) at February 17, 2013 12:01 PM (qyv02)

127
Knight's Cross Panzers, Th German 35th Panzer Regiment in WWII.

Another Stackpole Military History Series Book. Written by and for members of the regiment, it mainly consists of first hand accounts of daily life and combat. Thankfully, Stackpole found the manuscript and published it for a wider audience.

It was a Christmas present from me -- my brother and I exchange Stackpole military books every Christmas. For anybody who remembers the old Ballantine war books, these are similar. Larger and better, however. It seems like I can't read enough of them.

Posted by: Ed Anger at February 17, 2013 12:01 PM (tOkJB)

128 Me, I'm recommending moron Oldsailor's Poet's first book, Amy Lynn,

Thank you so much, you are very kind. But like Chili cheese fries, it is meant to be devoured.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:03 PM (l86i3)

129 Sorry folks I gave up on Robert Jordan's diarrhea of words he called his 'Wheel of Time' series. Napoleon's slog through the snow retreating from Russia goes at a faster pace than the first five books. So I quit the series. Jordan needed a tough editor.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 12:04 PM (7tbEC)

130 I read the Gulag Archipelago as a summer project between my sophomore and junior years of college. I had the same feeling you did: Solzhenitsyn went through so much, it was the least I could do to finish the damn thing.

The fattest book I read recently was The Thirty Years War: Europe's Tragedy, which weighed in at a svelte 1024 pages. Good book but it crowded out all my other reading.

Posted by: joncelli at February 17, 2013 12:05 PM (CWlPF)

131 The Gulag Archipelago IS available in Kindle form. A version can be found at archive dot org, and can be downloaded in PDF, Kindle, and other formats.

An absolutely monumental work.

Posted by: Wiccapundit at February 17, 2013 12:05 PM (pwb0T)

132
Still enjoying it, but the errors are starting to get annoying.

Posted by: Assault Citizen Anachronda at February 17, 2013 11:10 AM (1c58W)

Thank you for that. I spent a lot of money on an editor because I'm not writer, more a story teller. I'll certainly shop for another editor for the next one.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:06 PM (l86i3)

133
Agree with those that have lauded Michner. Just about anything that man wrote is worth picking up. Hawaii was particularly good.

Another somewhat fat book that was surprisingly good.....Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry. I only read that one at the insistence of my then girlfriend, since Western's are kind of.....Meh....to me. Once I got three pages in, I couldn't put it down. Finished it in one sitting.

Posted by: Sticky Wicket at February 17, 2013 12:06 PM (KESFj)

134
>>But like Chili cheese fries, it is meant to be devoured.


Like a pie...or a farm girl.

Posted by: garrett at February 17, 2013 12:07 PM (tARjI)

135 Best fat book? Mark Helprin's "A Soldier of the Great War" is the best
novel I've evr read, period. It checked in at nearly 1,000 pages, and I
felt great regret when I neared the end.


Another one I had forgotten to mention. That really is a great book, classic literature level, and certainly his best, although I've read most of his other stuff as well. Winter's Tale was quite good. I gather he's more or less quit writing now.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 12:07 PM (6TB1Z)

136 130 I read the Gulag Archipelago as a summer project between my sophomore and junior years of college. I had the same feeling you did: Solzhenitsyn went through so much, it was the least I could do to finish the damn thing.

The fattest book I read recently was The Thirty Years War: Europe's Tragedy, which weighed in at a svelte 1024 pages. Good book but it crowded out all my other reading.
Posted by: joncelli at February 17, 2013 12:05 PM (CWlPF)

I read the Gulag Archipelago in high school. Geez, talk about a survivor.

I'm currently writing a book that'll be even bigger: 1,000,001 Ways To Start A Fight.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:07 PM (7xPCu)

137 I read Gulag in High School - turned me into Cicero's only long-haired dope-smokin' hippie with a stated goal in life of taking down the Soviet Empire.

Posted by: motionview at February 17, 2013 12:07 PM (wo0qO)

138 Life and Fate by Grossman. The War and Peace of WWII but easily one of the best books I've read in my lifetime

Posted by: Danny at February 17, 2013 12:08 PM (fS4Nl)

139 Another somewhat fat book that was surprisingly good.....Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry. I only read that one at the insistence of my then girlfriend, since Western's are kind of.....Meh....to me. Once I got three pages in, I couldn't put it down. Finished it in one sitting.
Posted by: Sticky Wicket at February 17, 2013 12:06 PM (KESFj)

Yep, my favorite too. It was gritty. It gave you the real version of the old west istead of a cleaned up version. I could almost feel the dirt on my skin.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:08 PM (l86i3)

140 I still have "A Suitable Boy" on my shelf, but never got past the first few chapters. I suppose I should give it another shot.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 12:09 PM (6TB1Z)

141 I read a book about a year ago about an EMP attack... book was huge.. gave me arm cramps.
I had to lie down to read it so I didnt have to hold it.

Posted by: Jumbo Shrimp at February 17, 2013 12:09 PM (DGIjM)

142 Another vote for Gulag, in my case for the abridged version.

I read it (with some trepidation) for the first time just last month, and it actually _helped_ my current political outlook, if for no other reason than it showed what it is possible for a human being to endure, and what kind of mental clarity it requires.

I'm currently reading ("Black Swan" author) Nassim Nicholas Taleb's latest, "Antifragility," which I highly recommend, and crunching through some popular neuroscience stuff on the origin of emotions. I'm a musician, but I have eclectic tastes. 8-)

Posted by: Piercello at February 17, 2013 12:10 PM (E/6f0)

143 I'm currently writing a book that'll be even bigger: 1,000,001 Ways To Start A Fight.

1) Sarah Palin rawks
2) Sarah Palin sux
3) RINOS vs Purity Brigade
You don't need any more than that.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 12:10 PM (6TB1Z)

144 >>>about a year ago about an EMP attack

"One Second After." ?

Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 12:10 PM (4Mv1T)

145 Moby Dick has a few pages.

Posted by: sTevo at February 17, 2013 12:10 PM (VMcEw)

146 Like a few others here, the Wheel of Time series (a couple times) by Robert Jordan. 14 fat volumes. Also Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind. The Stand, by Stephen King, uncut version is pretty dam big.

Posted by: SamIam at February 17, 2013 12:11 PM (S09w5)

147 Moby Dick has a few pages.
Posted by: sTevo at February 17, 2013 12:10 PM (VMcEw)

It's a whale of a book.

(I crack myself up sometimes)

Posted by: Bitter Clinger (aka Ol' 3 tooth) at February 17, 2013 12:12 PM (qyv02)

148
On thick books -

Asimov's Foundation Trilogy. Lugged the one volumn SFBC edition around for a week or two in high school and read it between, and often during, classes.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 17, 2013 12:12 PM (kdS6q)

149 For a boots-on-the-ground view of the US Army from 1946 to the 1970s, through Korea, Berlin, and Vietnam, by a highly-decorated soldier, David Hackworth's "About Face".

Critiqued the careerism and waste in the military. 875 pages. I'm not a fast reader, so I guess that not all of my youth was mis-spent.

Posted by: Die Trying at February 17, 2013 12:12 PM (w7J/R)

150 I recently read The Story Of Edgar Sawtelle. Forgot the author. Really good read, and about 560 pages.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:13 PM (7xPCu)

151 Here's a funny as hell fast read: "The Choirboys" by Joseph Wambaugh. The movie didn't even come close to the book.
"Fields of Fire" by James Webb is a decent read. One of the first war books I ever read, was in the 6th grade. Sis Vincentia didn't approve when she saw the language content.

Posted by: fastfreefall at February 17, 2013 12:13 PM (ngjEQ)

152 Happy Hockey Day, btw.

Posted by: garrett at February 17, 2013 12:14 PM (tARjI)

153 144 >>>about a year ago about an EMP attack

"One Second After." ?
Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 12:10 PM (4Mv1T)

I read that one too.. it was another one. 1 second after isnt that long of a story.
For the life of me.. i cant even remember the name of the book.
About a man who lives in Texas and his neighbors form a community after the EMP... he ends up at the end being elected to Sheriff

Posted by: Jumbo Shrimp at February 17, 2013 12:15 PM (DGIjM)

154 Die Trying, 'About Face' is an interesting read. One of Hackworth's recommendations has become reality by accident.

He talked about the United States creating a copy of the French Foreign Legion. A military force that can be sent anywhere and no one in America would care. It seems the all-volunteer force has become that legion under this administration.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 12:15 PM (7tbEC)

155 Posted by: Die Trying at February 17, 2013 11:46 AM(w7J/R)

Apparently his son was a brat when young, although that could be the wife's doing rather than the general's. A knitting friend in CO was on a ship out of the Phillipines with other military families and his family was there too. She said her mothrr named their goat "McArthur" because she disliked yhe general so much.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette, assault Hobbit at February 17, 2013 12:15 PM (UBC8/)

156 152 Happy Hockey Day, btw.
Posted by: garrett at February 17, 2013 12:14 PM (tARjI)

Didn't know there was such a thing...it's not as if I needed an excuse to start drinking, however.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:15 PM (7xPCu)

157 Jumbo Shrimp, not 'Alas Babylon' is it?

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 12:16 PM (7tbEC)

158
Enjoyed about the first two hundred pages of 'The Stand' by Stephen King before MEGO (My-Eyes-Glazed-Over) set in.
OTOH "Red Storm Rising" and "Clear and Present Danger" by Tom Clancy were fat and fun.

Posted by: furious_a at February 17, 2013 12:16 PM (8lw4l)

159 One of the greatest fat books I read on an almost daily basis is the Machinery's Handbook. 2500 pages of magnificence.

Posted by: Fritz at February 17, 2013 12:16 PM (WM+rJ)

160 Hamilton by Ron Chernow is a worthy read.

Posted by: garrett at February 17, 2013 12:16 PM (tARjI)

161 Still enjoying it, but the errors are starting to get annoying.

Posted by: Assault Citizen Anachronda at February 17, 2013 11:10 AM (1c58W)


Hey, if you want, you could give me a page number and paragraph for what you find, put in on a word document and E-mail it to me, I'll send you a signed dead tree. Then I can have it re-edited. It's cost money but if it bothers you, I'm sure it bothers others.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:16 PM (l86i3)

162 Easy way to get stuff on your Kindle: Install the chrome plug-in from readability.com. You can send any web page to your Kindle personal documents email address with a click. Works great for long articles or gutenberg books. Another way is to cut and paste into a doc and save it as a PDF (use a very large font size). You can email that to your Kindle personal doc account.

Posted by: Raul Johnson at February 17, 2013 12:17 PM (xnRll)

163
I tried to read this one long book and couldn't because it sucked. It was titled The Tin Drum and was really fat. I wish I could have the few hours I invested in that book back.

Posted by: Ed Anger at February 17, 2013 12:17 PM (tOkJB)

164 She said her mothrr named their goat "McArthur" because she disliked yhe general so much.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette, assault Hobbit at February 17, 2013 12:15 PM (UBC8/)

Funny you mention that...I name each of my dog's turds Obama before picking them up with a plastic bag and throwing them away.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:17 PM (7xPCu)

165 One of the greatest fat books I read on an almost daily basis is the Machinery's Handbook. 2500 pages of magnificence.
Posted by: Fritz at February 17, 2013 12:16 PM (WM+rJ)

I still find stuff in there that I didn't even know were important or personally valuable.

And then there's the tables.

Oh the f'ing tables.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger (aka Ol' 3 tooth) at February 17, 2013 12:18 PM (qyv02)

166 Funny you mention that...I name each of my dog's turds Obama before picking them up with a plastic bag and throwing them away.
Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:17 PM (7xPCu)

LOL, "take an Obama" is a big thing in our house.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:18 PM (l86i3)

167 Two by Mark Helprin - Winter's Tale and Soldier of the Great War.

Posted by: real joe in blue state hell at February 17, 2013 12:18 PM (PD2ad)

168 We are way past 50 so I am going OT

http://bit.ly/YzH875

Here are some of the cuter feminist that I have seen. Much cuter than our elected ones.

Posted by: sTevo at February 17, 2013 12:18 PM (VMcEw)

169 The fattest book I've ever read was probably Atlas Shrugged. I've also read Shelby Foote's three-volume Civil War history.

I have a copy of Gulag Archipelago that I bought at a library sale. It's 660 pages. I take it that it's a condensed version?

Posted by: rickl at February 17, 2013 12:19 PM (sdi6R)

170 A few good books of girth that I haven't upthread:


"Gravity's Rainbow" by Thomas Pynchon

"V" by Thomas Pynchon

Surprisingly fun, interesting comic novels. These along with "The Crying of Lot 49"(lo-cal novel) are the best of Pynchon. Nothing he's written since is nearly as good- maybe he said all he really had to say in the first three.


"Ratner's Star" by Don DeLillo

This is DeLillo imitating Pynchon. For me it works very well. This is when DeLillo was writing interesting stuff like "The Names" and "Running Dogs". These days he seems like a long winded lefty crank fishing for a Nobel.


"Book of the New Sun" by Gene Wolfe

More than one SF "book" but it's all the same story. unlike anything you've ever read.


"Hyperion" by Dan Simmons

Excellent and surprisingly moving in parts.



"The Last Lion" by William Manchester

Churchill biography that reads like an action novel.
My God, what a life he led.

Posted by: naturalfake at February 17, 2013 12:19 PM (G9qZk)

171
re 27 "Mostly I read big non fiction books to go to sleep by, and they are usually hardcover and uncomfortable to have crushing the sternum for a half an hour."
I'm a bed reader too and I use a as seen on tv "Total Pillow" to support them on my sternum. It's a good thickness for the purpose, not too thin or fat. Also, if you cross a leg the pillow can be like a cradle for the book because it bends easily and you can be pretty much hands free aside from turning pages. I use it for kindle reading too in this way.

Posted by: SamIam at February 17, 2013 12:19 PM (S09w5)

172 Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 12:07 PM (6TB1Z)

Mark Helprin just had a new novel last autumn.

Posted by: somebody else, not me at February 17, 2013 12:19 PM (nZvGM)

173 "The Cat In The Hat"" --Dr Seuss

It's been 2 weeks but I've almost finished it.

Posted by: Smokin' Joe Biden at February 17, 2013 12:19 PM (w+Dvf)

174 Does anyone know which free reader I should get to use with my HP Touchpad (Android) ? It was a hand me down, has no reader on it but I have heard that there are plenty out there for tablets. Anyone ever heard of Mosaic? That's what I see recommended most, but it seems to do a lot more than what I want/need.

Posted by: Lincolntf at February 17, 2013 12:19 PM (ZshNr)

175 FWIW, very few of Michener's books are on Kindle;
can't find Robin Cook's books out there, either (I'd like to re-read
"Coma" - enjoyed it back in HS).

Posted by: Teresa in Fort Worth, TX at February 17, 2013 11:58 AM (ADnWI)

I have about 20 or so Robin Cook and 7 or 8 James Michener that I would be happy to "loan" you.E-mail addy in nic.

Posted by: Tunafish at February 17, 2013 12:20 PM (pgGli)

176 157 Jumbo Shrimp, not 'Alas Babylon' is it?
Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 12:16 PM (7tbEC)

that doesnt sound familiar. Is that one good?

Posted by: Jumbo Shrimp at February 17, 2013 12:20 PM (DGIjM)

177 What I'm reading this week? The Official CIA Manual of trickery and deception, by Kieth Melton and Robert Wallace.

Did you know they made a Tooth paste tube that shot a .22? And the CIA had a rather famous Magician teaching it's agents slight of hand.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:22 PM (l86i3)

178 >>>We are way past 50 so I am going OT

I was going to inquire about the whereabouts of the gun thread, but didn't want to be the first to fart out loud in the library.

Posted by: Tobacco Road at February 17, 2013 12:22 PM (4Mv1T)

179 Lights out! thats the name of the book. geebus.

Posted by: Jumbo Shrimp at February 17, 2013 12:22 PM (DGIjM)

180 "Fields of Fire" by James Webb is a decent read. One of the first war books I ever read, was in the 6th grade. Sis Vincentia didn't approve when she saw the language content.

Posted by: fastfreefall at February 17, 2013 12:13 PM (ngjEQ)
======================================
James Webbperformedoutstanding service to his country, went on to become Sec. of Navy under Reagan and probably got a good understanding of how dysfunctional bureaucracies are.

Then,as Senator from Virginia, he voted for Obamacare. I will never understand it.

Posted by: Die Trying at February 17, 2013 12:22 PM (w7J/R)

181 Foundation, when it was just a trilogy, and everything else by Asimov up til then. Robots!
Lord of the Rings including the appendices. Read Hobbit + LotT aloud to the kids.
The Urantia papers, several times. With comprehension. mostly.
Moby Dick gets more fun with each re-read.
The Collected AoS ONTs Comments. In the original Gaelic!
So many words, so few years.

Posted by: a mindful webworker dry drunk on life at February 17, 2013 12:23 PM (Jh9QN)

182 Two other good books set in Vietnam: "Rumors of War" by Phillip Caputo and John Del Vecchio's "the 13 Valley".
Another good read is Perez-Reverte's "La Reina Del Sur", it's in English too. An interesting take on the narco lifestyle.

Posted by: fastfreefall at February 17, 2013 12:23 PM (ngjEQ)

183 Jumbo Shrimp. 'Alas Babylon' is about a town in Florida that gets warning of a Soviet nuclear attack and tries to survive. Written by Pat Frank. So probably not what you are looking for. Just the first story that popped to my mind.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 12:24 PM (7tbEC)

184 BTW; all you e book buyers? You do know you're ruining hard cover printing?

Also you won't be able to pass those books on to anyone. (well if you keep things legal you can't)

You're renting not buying. And also your book can be gone forever in an electronic blizzard of unknown cause.

I believe that e books should not be the primary way to purchase books but should be sold as an adjunct. They're particularly good for books that are a one time read.

I understand their appeal but seriously, it's going to be a giant headache in a few years.

Only until DRM laws are brought back on the side of the consumer will that be resolved.

Of course companies like Amazon love the sh!t out of it. They're selling you pixels that you don't even own. It's better than 3 card monte. Low overhead; big payoffs.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger (aka Ol' 3 tooth) at February 17, 2013 12:24 PM (qyv02)

185 Then,as Senator from Virginia, he voted for Obamacare. I will never understand it.
Posted by: Die Trying at February 17, 2013 12:22 PM (w7J/R)


Think getting filthy rich from payoffs, jobs for family and friends and insider trading schemes. It starts to make perfect sense.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:24 PM (l86i3)

186 Here's a funny as hell fast read: "The Choirboys" by Joseph Wambaugh. The movie didn't even come close to the book.

"Diamond Cutter" heh heh.

Posted by: Tunafish at February 17, 2013 12:24 PM (pgGli)

187 I read Don Quixote over summer 2012, mostly while sitting at a bar off Morrison Street in Portland. It was the only way I could finish it.

Posted by: Colorado Alex at February 17, 2013 12:24 PM (hpDVh)

188 @183 I like those kinds of books. I will have to check it out.

Posted by: Jumbo Shrimp at February 17, 2013 12:25 PM (DGIjM)

189 I am about halfway through Foote's 3 volume Civil War (superb). I hope to finish it before the the 150th anniversary of Appomattox.

Posted by: real joe in blue state hell at February 17, 2013 12:25 PM (PD2ad)

190 Rickl, my copy is 472pp (1985) in a trade paperback size (not mass market), and it was abridged by Ericson with the blessing of Solzhenitsyn himself.

Posted by: Piercello at February 17, 2013 12:25 PM (E/6f0)

191 173 "The Cat In The Hat"" --Dr SeussIt's been 2 weeks but I've almost finished it.
Posted by: Smokin' Joe Biden at February 17, 2013 12:19 PM (w+Dvf)

*******

Hey Joe- you might like his other book- "Green Eggs and Ham". It has a part where the hero is eating them on a train.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 12:25 PM (qqZuQ)

192 "Diamond Cutter" heh heh.

And blue veiner.

Posted by: real joe in blue state hell at February 17, 2013 12:26 PM (PD2ad)

193 OSP, get Sabrina Chase's editor if you can. Her books are pristine regarding spelling and obvious grammatical errors.

Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette, assault Hobbit at February 17, 2013 12:26 PM (UBC8/)

194 It seems the all-volunteer force has become that legion under this administration.

No, the left cared mightily about our casualties..... from 2001-2008. I know this because they told us so.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 12:26 PM (6TB1Z)

195 And by 'train' I mean 'choo-choo'.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 12:26 PM (qqZuQ)

196 My rule is "Never read a book fatter than your cock is long"

So I've read pretty much everything there is to read.
_

Posted by: BumperStickerist at February 17, 2013 12:27 PM (J8DGo)

197 OSP, get Sabrina Chase's editor if you can. Her books are pristine regarding spelling and obvious grammatical errors.
Posted by: Polliwog the 'Ette, assault Hobbit at February 17, 2013 12:26 PM (UBC8/)

Eye Eye Ette. If I see her poking around I'll ask. It helps that I think she actually knows how to write.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:27 PM (l86i3)

198
Albie Damned at February 17, 2013 11:04 AM
Good luck with your choice of replacements.

Posted by: harleycowboy at February 17, 2013 12:27 PM (+9AX9)

199 I once had a copy of Trottman's reprint of "The History Of The Rifle Brigade" (sob, weep). Huge. Expensive. Color plates.

Posted by: mrp at February 17, 2013 12:27 PM (HjPtV)

200 pep, your sarcasm is so sharp in that answer bet you could cut a diamond.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 12:27 PM (7tbEC)

201 The entire Aubry/Maturin series by Obrien might count....more delightful second reading of all 20 some odd books....

Posted by: InfoProf at February 17, 2013 12:27 PM (Rs0r1)

202 Good luck OSP. Try to tell Granny Patches that she now has to speak proper English.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 12:29 PM (7tbEC)

203
It was titled The Tin Drum and was really fat. I wish I could have the few hours I invested in that book back.

The Tin Drum does not suck. Not by a long shot.
The rest of that trilogy is less than inspired...though 'The Flounder' is excellent, The Tin Drum is probably Grass' best.

Posted by: garrett at February 17, 2013 12:29 PM (GjPgD)

204 "Hyperion" by Dan Simmons
Posted by: naturalfake at February 17, 2013 12:19 PM (G9qZk)

Do you mean the entire Hyperion Cantos or just that one book?

Hyperion
Fall of Hyperion
Endymion
Rise of Endymion

I agree they're all very good and very thought provoking.

Posted by: Bitter Clinger (aka Ol' 3 tooth) at February 17, 2013 12:29 PM (qyv02)

205 Good luck OSP. Try to tell Granny Patches that she now has to speak proper English.
Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 12:29 PM (7tbEC)


You aint tellin Granny shit, she tells you.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:29 PM (l86i3)

206 Rise and Fall of the Third Reich - Shirer. I spoze that a lot of the historical stuff has been changed since it was published, but it was good at the time.

Shelby Foote's "Civil War" Trilogy - it's a good read. The only problem with the series was that I'd watched Ken Burns's 'The Civil War' and so was reading the book in Shelby Foote's voice. Which was fine, but I had to stop every so often to have a bourbon and smoke a pipe.

Posted by: BumperStickerist at February 17, 2013 12:31 PM (J8DGo)

207 A real heart warming, often a tear jerker true story is "Last dog on the hill" by Steve Duno. If you like dogs, this one rocks.

Posted by: fastfreefall at February 17, 2013 12:32 PM (ngjEQ)

208 Does the US Tax-Code for 2013, or the oBamaCare Act count?

Posted by: Madame Pelosi of great dignity at February 17, 2013 12:32 PM (xehjI)

209 Did you know they made a Tooth paste tube that shot a .22?
Posted by: Oldsailors Poet at February 17, 2013 12:22 PM (l86i3)

********


Is that for the really hard-to-remove plaque?

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 12:32 PM (qqZuQ)

210 Is that for the really hard-to-remove plaque?
Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 12:32 PM (qqZuQ)


LOL, yep the plaque on a commie spies teeth.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:33 PM (l86i3)

211
One of the greatest fat books I read on an almost daily basis is the Machinery's Handbook. 2500 pages of magnificence.

That was my bible, back when I had one of those "job" thingys.

I called them once in the mid-90's and asked when they were going to put it on a CD-ROM.

I was laughed at. Guess which format it's now available on...

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, who did not vote for this shit. at February 17, 2013 12:33 PM (+z4pE)

212 Amazing Spider-Man Ombibus Vol. 1

Posted by: Aquaviva at February 17, 2013 12:35 PM (N+5MV)

213 One of the greatest fat books I read on an almost daily basis is the Machinery's Handbook. 2500 pages of magnificence.


That's a great book, when I was a millwright pipefitter I wore it out. Lots of formulas.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:35 PM (l86i3)

214 Just finished "Last of the Mohicans" ......believe it or not, Hollywood took some liberties with the story.

Posted by: USS Diversity at February 17, 2013 12:36 PM (QLJPW)

215 Well I went looking and am supposedly downloading the Kindle app for tablets right now. If it works, I will have officially joined the e-book crowd. Never read one before.

Posted by: lincolntf at February 17, 2013 12:36 PM (ZshNr)

216

So, what fat books have you guys read and enjoyed?



Does Michelle's ass count as a book?

Posted by: Barry O. at February 17, 2013 12:36 PM (BBWjt)

217 Besides Shogun ? Finished the 3 books in the ongoing Red Gambit Series in a two weekend book binge . Wild ride/read .

Posted by: DrDrill at February 17, 2013 12:36 PM (Wvbac)

218 I found this very conservative author this week, named Robert Bidinotto who was famous for writing Criminal Justice: The Legal System versus Individual Responsibility. He was responsible for the defeat of Michael Dukakis in the 88 election as he wrote the original article about Willie Horton.

He is starting a series featuring a vigilante called Dylan Thomas. Very good writing and unabashedly conservative in tone and message. His expose of the filth and corruption of the justice system, and its liberal mental derangement is the best you can find. His first book in the series is called HUNTER: A Thriller (A Dylan Thomas Thriller).

And don't forget my first eBook on Amazon;
Armageddon Now: The End of Once and Future War.

http://tinyurl.com/aflp8pj


It is everything you want to know about Armageddon and is a far more hopeful book than you would guess.

Posted by: Jehu at February 17, 2013 12:36 PM (cSD32)

219 Just finished "Last of the Mohicans" ......believe it or not, Hollywood took some liberties with the story.
Posted by: USS Diversity at February 17, 2013 12:36 PM (QLJPW)

Yep, I learned long ago if you read the book, the movies will piss you off.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:37 PM (l86i3)

220 Watchmen - Portfolio Sized edition.

I've been reading "The Bible" printed without the chapter and verse numbers. Makes a difference - reading experiential-wise

Posted by: BumperStickerist at February 17, 2013 12:37 PM (J8DGo)

221 @114

Foote narrated an audio version of the excerpt from The Civil War called Stars in their Courses about the Gettysburg Campaign.

It was as good as you might imagine.

Not currently offered on Audible, but you should be able to find the cassette version used somewhere.

Couldn't tell you if there was ever a CD version, though.

Posted by: turfmann at February 17, 2013 12:37 PM (GgGgG)

222 215 Well I went looking and am supposedly downloading the Kindle app for tablets right now. If it works, I will have officially joined the e-book crowd. Never read one before.
Posted by: lincolntf at February 17, 2013 12:36 PM (ZshNr)

I've resisted. I'm dead tree. I like holding the book.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:38 PM (l86i3)

223 Pleasing Women, Vol I.

http://preview.tinyurl.com/b82vww7


You might want to find a nice comfortable place to settle in for a long afternoon.

Posted by: Count de Monet at February 17, 2013 12:38 PM (BAS5M)

224 You might want to find a nice comfortable place to settle in for THE REST OF YOUR FKN LIFE.

FIFY

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:39 PM (l86i3)

225 I actually know some guy who actually bragged that outside of required reading for school, has read about seven books in his entire life. He's the ultimate low information voter, and a Democrat. Spends all day watching tennis and golf on TV.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:39 PM (7xPCu)

226 I feel out of place on these book threads. I have little interest in reading fiction. And I spend so much time on the internet that I don't have any time to read books in general. My attention span is horrible.

One fat nonfiction book that I started is Paul Johnson's "The Birth of the Modern". It covers the period between 1815 to 1830. It's exactly 1000 pages long, not counting the notes and index, which brings it to almost 1100. I started it a few months ago but got distracted and stalled out after about 100 pages. It's good, though. I'd recommend it, even though I haven't actually read the whole thing. Yet.

Posted by: rickl at February 17, 2013 12:39 PM (sdi6R)

227
Then,as Senator from Virginia, [Webb] voted for Obamacare. I will never understand it.
Posted by: Die Trying



Webb was one of those Vietnam era offices that developed a real "look at me" mavericky streak. See also: MCcain, John and Powell, Colin.

He was a loose cannon as Navy Sec and eventually resigned in a huff, and his career in congress was more of the same.

Tell you what though, he did write some good books back in the day. A Sense of Honor, set in the Naval Academy, was excellent.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 17, 2013 12:40 PM (kdS6q)

228 It's good, though. I'd recommend it, even though I haven't actually read the whole thing. Yet.
Posted by: rickl at February 17, 2013 12:39 PM (sdi6R)

The 5 thousand year leap is like that for me. It's a damn textbook.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:41 PM (l86i3)

229 Shogun of course. The Stand, shorter version. The Source. Hawaii I think was fat. I also know a fat guy thatwho reads fat books, so there's that.

Posted by: Guido at February 17, 2013 12:41 PM (XLuH2)

230 I'm move prepping and recycling books right now. Just tossed Battlefield Earth and a bunch of that 10 vol. LRH series into the go box. Not gonna wade thru it again to see if it's as so bad you have to watch the trainwreck movie.

Posted by: DaveA at February 17, 2013 12:42 PM (6YLIm)

231 I've resisted. I'm dead tree. I like holding the book.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy
Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:38 PM (l86i3)

It was these heavy books that we're talking about today that drove me to the Kindle in the first place.

Posted by: Tunafish at February 17, 2013 12:42 PM (pgGli)

232
Tell you what though, he did write some good books back in the day. A Sense of Honor, set in the Naval Academy, was excellent.
Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 17, 2013 12:40 PM (kdS6q)=----------------------------
One of my all time favorites.

Posted by: USS Diversity at February 17, 2013 12:43 PM (QLJPW)

233 A funny as heck historical fiction book set in Mexican Revolution is "Tom Mix and Pancho Villa" by Clifford Irving. It's a great afternoon read.

Posted by: fastfreefall at February 17, 2013 12:44 PM (ngjEQ)

234 I've resisted. I'm dead tree. I like holding the book.
Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:38 PM (l86i3)

Same here. My parents gave me a kindle for a Christmas present. It sat on my desk until next Christmas, when I gave it back to them. It wasn't exactly regifting, but they weren't too amused nonetheless - they thought I would love it. My mom likes using it.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:44 PM (7xPCu)

235 It was these heavy books that we're talking about today that drove me to the Kindle in the first place.
Posted by: Tunafish at February 17, 2013 12:42 PM (pgGli)


I can certainly see why the kids like it. It's what they know. I tried doing it once, quit and got the dead tree. I guess I'm just reaching the "Get Off My Lawn" stage.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:45 PM (l86i3)

236 Have read several Micheners, all of Clavell, Winds if War and War and Remembrance and all of Patrick O'Brien's Aubrey / Maturin series (Master and Commander). Also several Tom Clancy books. Weird reading list for a straight chick.

Posted by: Ex liberal at February 17, 2013 12:46 PM (qA2nk)

237 Read Churchill's WWII history when I was a teen. A few slow parts later in the war. Lots of stuff most people don't know, like how many countries supported the Allies and Also sent troops, like from South America for an example. Explains a lot about how the postwar developed.

Posted by: Bill sometimes Bill from Canada at February 17, 2013 12:47 PM (lgIfz)

238 Posted by: Ex liberal at February 17, 2013 12:46 PM (qA2nk)

Oh I don't thnk so, that makes you good marryin stock.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:47 PM (l86i3)

239 I can certainly see why the kids like it. It's what they know. I tried doing it once, quit and got the dead tree. I guess I'm just reaching the "Get Off My Lawn" stage.
Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:45 PM (l86i3)

I'll know I'm at that stage when I install a porch swing, so I have a good perch from which to yell at those damned kids.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:47 PM (7xPCu)

240 "
The entire Aubry/Maturin series by Obrien might count....more delightful second reading of all 20 some odd books...."
I forgot all about reading them.
Fantastic read, every bit as good as the Hornblower series.

Oft forgotten pro-tip when looking for out of print books is ABE books, now owned by Amazon.

I once had to find a 38 page book written many years ago, about the history of the VIA family in Switzerland, and their religious persecution prior to immigrating to what would become the United States.
Took about ten minutes.

abebooks.com

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 17, 2013 12:47 PM (bTPOR)

241 When Anne Applebaum's Gulag came out I wondered why bother reading it, since Solzhenitsyn had so thoroughly covered the subject. Glad I did anyway, because she goes into the economic aspects of it. A reason it lasted so long was because Stalin was convinced he was getting "free" economic benefits from all the slave labor, which Applebaum proves was not true. The Gulag actually cost more to run than the "free" labor was worth. Assholes crippled their own economy with free slave labor. I'd laugh except we're doing the same thing with free Obamaphones, birth control, and medical coverage.

She also documented how Stalin would establish quotas for region to fill, so the Party organizations would in some cases simply pick random names, order the midnight visits, and ship the hapless victims off to the camps. It really was that arbitrary.

Posted by: Steve Skubinna at February 17, 2013 12:48 PM (XLQXo)

242
I've resisted. I'm dead tree. I like holding the book.
Posted by: Oldsailors Poet




Having moved a few thousand books once, no way can I do that again.

Keep the dead tree collectible signed first editions, the research library and the obscure stuff. Let the library book sale have the rest.

A few TB of ebooks is very portable and very cheap*.


*DRM? Wut dat?

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 17, 2013 12:48 PM (kdS6q)

243 The "Affordable Care Act" was good. Read it cover-to-cover.

Posted by: Said Nobody In Congress at February 17, 2013 12:49 PM (FcR7P)

244 I'd laugh except we're doing the same thing with free Obamaphones, birth control, and medical coverage.

It's not funny when you consider that it's the taxpayers providing the labor to supply the cash and prizes Obama's showering his supporters with.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:50 PM (7xPCu)

245 which brings it to almost 1100. I started it a few months ago but got distracted and stalled out after about 100 pages. It's good, though. I'd recommend it, even though I haven't actually read the whole thing. Yet.
Posted by: rickl at February 17, 2013 12:39 PM (sdi6R)

*******

Well, as JJ Sefton likes to say:

DAY 103 1,357 to go (1,432 to Inauguration Day 2017)
*******
Just read one page a day and you'll be finished before Inauguration Day 2017.

Posted by: Seamus Muldoon at February 17, 2013 12:50 PM (qqZuQ)

246 One of the greatest fat books I read on an almost daily basis is the Machinery's Handbook. 2500 pages of magnificence.

Well, if we're going there, I see your Machinery's Handbood, and raise you the CRC (Chemical Rubber Company) handbook. CRC was the go to reference to chemistry, formulas (of both kinds), and general tables on physical properties. It was indispensable 30 years ago.

Tell you what though, he did write some good books back in the day. A Sense of Honor, set in the Naval Academy, was excellent.

I also really enjoyed "The Emperor's General". He should have stuck to writing.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 12:50 PM (6TB1Z)

247 Well I'm back and flat tire is fixed.


CBD, good song.


On fat books

The Stand - King's best but the original version should be cut by 1/4. The new one should never have been published.


Atlas Shrugged - Typical Russian writer syndrome; diarrhea of the pen. Shorten by 3/4. I don't need 15 pages to describe how grass grows.


Shogun - great book Clavell's best, no need to cut anything. All of his stuff is good but I liked Shogun best, then Noble House. My least favorite was ing Rat.


As for Shelby Foot's civil war epic. I didn't like it at all. Boring as hell.


And yes, I love large books because I read so fast.

Posted by: Vic at February 17, 2013 12:51 PM (53z96)

248 Conquest: Montezuma, Cortes and the Fall of Old Mexico by Hugh Thomas. Science fiction has nothing on the utterly strange cultures the early explorers found, nor military history when it comes to the titanium balls the men under Cortes had. He was quite a tactician and politician too, he knew well how to divide and conquer. He probably didn't originally want to destroy the Aztec Empire, just make it a vassal of Spain, but Alvarado's attack in Tenochtitlan forced his hand.

Posted by: JHW at February 17, 2013 12:51 PM (B38OD)

249 And OSP, the errors in your book are don't bother me an iota. I would not worry about it at all.

Posted by: Vic at February 17, 2013 12:52 PM (53z96)

250 Webb was one of those Vietnam era offices that developed a real "look at me" mavericky streak. See also: MCcain, John and Powell, Colin.He was a loose cannon as Navy Sec and eventually resigned in a huff, and his career in congress was more of the same.
Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 17, 2013 12:40 PM (kdS6q)
========================
"Mavericky" -- Yes! That rings a bell. And disconnected; his Senate office couldn't manage to crank out a form letter when I wrote to him.

/sarcasm on: "Where do we get such men?" /sarcasm off

Posted by: Die Trying at February 17, 2013 12:52 PM (w7J/R)

251 I just "bought" On the Decay of the Art of Lying by Mark Twain. The Kindle app seems to have worked perfectly, though I was a bit surprised that they make you go through all the motions of purchasing a book through Amazon, including address confirmation, for a freebie. We'll see how I like the reading experience tonight.

Posted by: lincolntf at February 17, 2013 12:52 PM (ZshNr)

252 New one up

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 17, 2013 12:53 PM (bTPOR)

253 But this thread is comfortable. Like a good book.

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 12:53 PM (7tbEC)

254 And yes, I love large books because I read so fast.
Posted by: Vic at February 17, 2013 12:51 PM (53z96)

Plus, the makers of book-marks have mouths to feed too, you know.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:53 PM (7xPCu)

255 In sixth grade, some kids told me I couldn't read all 1048 pages of Gone With the Wind in a week (normal week, with homework and band and basketball). Took me six days. Assholes.


Are our tastes in books pretty much frozen in time up to your early 20s like music?


The past few months I've thrown into the "donate to library sale" box several books I liked in my 20s but I couldn't reread because they're stupid or boring or preachy. Not sure if my taste is improving or I'm getting crotchety.

I'll have to grab some Michener at the library Tuesday. The Adult Winter Reading Program hands out rewards for pages consumed. It's not like when I was a kid and the librarians refused to give me points for reading books they thought were too easy for me, but as the genius who lives in my closet says, "They make the rules" and I WILL game this system. Lol.

Today I'm re-reading Crichton's Next before it goes into the donate box.

Posted by: HeatherRadish™ drinking heavily at February 17, 2013 12:54 PM (hO8IJ)

256 OT: it sounds like it's starting to occur to Rubio that he's stepped in it big time with immigration.
http://tinyurl.com/cmscsd8

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 12:55 PM (6TB1Z)

257
The entire Aubry/Maturin series by Obrien might count....more delightful second reading of all 20 some odd books....

I have all twenty volumes, plus two of his earlier works. First read through his Aubrey/Maturin series, I kept close to the computer to look up definitions of obsolete words. Excellent books, great story telling, and for a man that never traveled by boat, he was well versed in all things nautical.

At first, I was convinced Maturin was going to be nothing more than a socially awkward comedic foil to Aubrey, but it did not work out that way. Both characters had their humorous moments, often playing off each other, both characters had their strengths, and weaknesses, both possessed their own unique moral compasses, which sometimes were in alignment, sometimes not. Other characters were well written, and were unique....Bonden, Killick, Sophie, Diana, Davies.

Also, this series is just as good on a second, third, or fourth rereading. If anyone out there enjoys historic fiction, from the age of sail, and Britain's height as a sea power, you'll enjoy these books.

Posted by: Sticky Wicket at February 17, 2013 12:55 PM (KESFj)

258 Also, this series is just as good on a second, third, or fourth rereading. If anyone out there enjoys historic fiction, from the age of sail, and Britain's height as a sea power, you'll enjoy these books.
Posted by: Sticky Wicket at February 17, 2013 12:55 PM (KESFj)

Can I get an "arrr, matey"?

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:57 PM (7xPCu)

259 Moby Dick has a few pages.
...
It's a whale of a book.


Get it off the shelf and I'll take another stab at it.

Posted by: Capt. Ahab at February 17, 2013 12:57 PM (6YLIm)

260 Some more kick ass, well written historical fiction are Steven Pressfield's books. Just finished "Last of the Amazons".

Posted by: fastfreefall at February 17, 2013 12:58 PM (ngjEQ)

261 Never At Rest.

Definitive book about Issac Newton. Took me a year to plow through it. I thought my brain would explode.

Posted by: mpfs, assault fishstick at February 17, 2013 12:58 PM (TCy/B)

262
225 I actually know some guy who actually bragged that outside of required reading for school, has read about seven books in his entire life. He's the ultimate low information voter, and a Democrat. Spends all day watching tennis and golf on TV.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:39 PM (7xPCu)


I worked with a guy who bragged that he'd never read a book. He'd say "they tried to make me in college, but they couldn't." He was a weirdo.

Posted by: Ed Anger at February 17, 2013 12:59 PM (tOkJB)

263
Hugh Thomas...

Posted by: JHW





Yeah. He's written a series of big 'ol history books on a variety of subjects and they're all pretty solid. Information dense but without sacrificing readability.

I particularly liked his Armed Truce on the early Cold War era, a subject that actually doesn't seem to have a lot of useful books written about it.

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 17, 2013 12:59 PM (kdS6q)

264 Are our tastes in books pretty much frozen in time up to your early 20s like music?

Not for me. Lots of sci-fi and other novels back then. Much more now on non-fiction, history, e.g. "James Madison and the Struggle for the Bill of Rights.". Not great writing, but informative.

And saddening, to think how much thought and effort went into the Constitution.

Posted by: Die Trying at February 17, 2013 01:00 PM (w7J/R)

265 Time for Daytona Qualifying. DANICA TAKES THE POLE!! you read it here first.


Oh wait, that didn't sound right.

Anyway she has a very fast car today.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 01:02 PM (l86i3)

266 I would say that around 1966 was the time when my reading skills erupted.
And look at who were the top S/F writers during that time.

Nothing modern seems to be able to take their place.
So now I stick with Penthouse Forum, and the other classics.

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 17, 2013 01:02 PM (bTPOR)

267 What It Takes: The Way to the White House by Richard Ben Cramer is huge and immensely satisfying. It's about the 1988 campaign for president and covers all the candidates in great detail. The author died recently.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at February 17, 2013 01:03 PM (BuSM8)

268
I worked with a guy who bragged that he'd never read a book. He'd say "they tried to make me in college, but they couldn't." He was a weirdo.

Posted by: Ed Anger





I knew a moderately attractive girl once who bragged that she'd never read a book. I told her that sounded so interesting and that I'd like to hear more. Would she like to have coffee and chat about it?

Biology. What can you do?

Posted by: Laurie David's Cervix at February 17, 2013 01:04 PM (kdS6q)

269 Are our tastes in books pretty much frozen in time up to your early 20s like music?



Not for me.


I agree with that. My tastes have become far more catholic since I was in my 20s. My list now includes lots of big histories, some biographies, and classic literature. Back then, I was mostly interested in Penthouse Letters.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 01:04 PM (6TB1Z)

270 "I worked with a guy who bragged that he'd never read a book. He'd say "they tried to make me in college, but they couldn't.""

Last name wouldn't have been Biden, would it?

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 17, 2013 01:04 PM (bTPOR)

271 I can certainly see why the kids like it. It's what
they know. I tried doing it once, quit and got the dead tree. I guess
I'm just reaching the "Get Off My Lawn" stage.

Posted by: Oldsailors Poet is no longer shamlessly hawking his book
Amy Lynn available on amazon. at February 17, 2013 12:45 PM (l86i3)



I'll know I'm at that stage when I install a porch swing, so I have a good perch from which to yell at those damned kids.

Posted by: model_1066 at February 17, 2013 12:47 PM (7xPCu)

I guess I'm just a 59 year old "kid".

Posted by: Tunafish at February 17, 2013 01:04 PM (pgGli)

272 @266
Dang, beat me to it.

Posted by: pep at February 17, 2013 01:05 PM (6TB1Z)

273 #272
Just because we're slow thinkers, doesn't mean we're not fast typers.

Wait.....what?

Posted by: Village Idiot's Apprentice at February 17, 2013 01:06 PM (bTPOR)

274 I think the fattest book I slogged through was "The Best and the Brightest" by David Halberstom, if I'm spelling his last name correctly. And this is coming from someone who had read Michner, Shirer etc. Took me forever to get through that book.

And correct me if I'm wrong, but isn't "The Lord of the Rings" one book, just divvied up into three by the U.S. publishers?

Posted by: HH at February 17, 2013 01:07 PM (XXwdv)

275
Asimov's Foundation Trilogy in a single volume is a door stop. And that's not including theother 6-8 novels in the series.
It is being made into a Hollywood movie by Roger Emmerich (Godzilla, Independence Day), who is exactly the wrong type of director for a smart, cerebral story, so it will likely suck.

Posted by: Huusker at February 17, 2013 01:10 PM (PaKLC)

276 Roland Emmerich.

Posted by: Huusker at February 17, 2013 01:11 PM (PaKLC)

277 Love The Source. Have read it twenty times at least

Posted by: Duhgee at February 17, 2013 01:14 PM (8J3Vd)

278 I thought I was a dead tree guy too, till I got the Kindle. Absolutely love it. Highlight a word by touching it, the dictionary definition pops up. Or you can access Wikipedia the same way. Not to mention I can go on vacay with the Kindle instead of a backpack full of books.

Posted by: real joe in blue state hell at February 17, 2013 01:17 PM (PD2ad)

279
Roger Emmerich? You mean Roland Emmerich??

John McCain, Jim Webb, Ollie North, John Poindexter

If you can find a copy, read "The Nightingale's Song".

Long, thick books. I am trying to read "Bloodlands" but I get very depressed after every 20-30 pages and stop for a few days. This is making it a long read.

Posted by: Reader C.J. Burch writes.... at February 17, 2013 01:18 PM (RFeQD)

280 Actually our reading tastes should keep growing. If we keep plowing through the same genres again and again, wouldn't mental ossification set in? Or worse stop reading because we have 'seen' this story already a million times before? Still do not plan to ever read 'Twilight' or '50 Shades.'

Posted by: Anna Puma (+SmuD) at February 17, 2013 01:18 PM (7tbEC)

281 This is off topic - but the Russian meteor thread is so old that if I put it there no one would see it.

Recent JPL estimates for the Russian meteor explosion put its yield at 500 kilotons, the height of burst at 12 to 15 miles and the size of the meteor at about 17 meters in diameter. The Russian stories originally put yield at around 4-6 kilotons, the burst height at about 4-6 miles and the meteor size at about 10 tons - making its diameter about 2 meters.

I believe the original Russian figures much more than the JPL numbers for the following reasons:

1.Because there were multiple camera angles showing the meteor the height of the blast does not have to be estimated, it can be directly calculated by trigonometry.

2. The sound and blast wave from the explosion took about twenty seconds to arrive after the flash was seen - sound takes about 5 seconds to travel a mile which indicates an explosion about 4 miles away.

3. The circle of destruction from a 500 kiloton detonation at high altitude would be much bigger than the destruction circle for a low kiloton burst at lower altitude.

4. The flash from a 500 KT event lasts much longer than that from a 4 Kt explosion. The reason for this is that a larger volume of air is heated to high temperature with the larger energy yield and it takes longer to cool down to where it is no longer glowing (an iceberg takes a lot longer to melt than a household ice cube for the same size reasons). The length of the flash indicates a low kiloton event - not half a megaton.

5. Because there is so much energy and the flash lasts so much longer for a 500 KT yield the heating effects felt on the ground would have been more than was observed people would have been burned by the larger yield.

JPL wants the rock to be a large one so they can say "This was a once in a hundred year impact - nothing to see here - everyone move along - no danger" The fact that it actually was about a 10 times per year event and that it did cause the public to notice is not in the government's "Everyone go to sleep and pay no attention to this" agenda.

Here is the cold hard truth about impact events: a rock about one kilometer in diameter hits the Earth about every 100,000 years on average. The 100,000 megaton blast from such an impact would result in the deaths of about a billion people and destroy civilization on the planet. The chance of that happening in the next ten years is about one in ten thousand.

There are reasons that the Obama administration classified the atmospheric impact data from satellites.

Posted by: An Observation at February 17, 2013 01:20 PM (ylhEn)

282 HH, you can read Mark Moyat's Victory Forsaken, and see how clueless Halberstam was.

Posted by: archie goodwin at February 17, 2013 01:21 PM (Jsiw/)

283
For a Europe in the Age of Total War class I took for my grad degree in history, one of the supplemental books was Eugenio Corti's "The Red Horse." 1000 pages about the Italian soldiers that fought on the Eastern Front against the Russians. A little slow for the first 100 pages but gets really good after that. I highly recommend it.

"Postwar" by Tony Judt is a really fat book about what happened in Europe right after the end of WWII. Great read as well.

"The Campaigns of Napoleon" by David Chandler is a great military history read, clocks in at 1164 pages. Has good maps too, a real weakness in most history books these days.

And Tolkien, gotta mention the grand-daddy of all that fat fantasy clogging up the shelves at Barnes and Noble. I tried to read Jordan and Goodkind but just gave up. Jordan was married to his editor (and it showed) and Goodkind needs some writing help and possibly some psychological help as well (just go and read the torture scenes involving children in his first book, you'll see what I mean).
A good buddy of mine is into all those fat trilogies that R.A. Salvatore wrote and I just shake my head at what he could have used that time to read instead....


Posted by: Pave Low John at February 17, 2013 01:23 PM (ilDAt)

284 I had a friend that hadn't done well in school and was on welfare. It was winter and she asked me if I had anything she could read. I gave her some Dickens, either David Copperfield or Oliver Twist. She loved it. She read a little Dickens in high school and hated it. We forget that Dickens wrote for common people.

The Audible books for the Shelby Foote series are not bad. Foote doesn't narrate them, but the guy that reads them is good. I had them all burned on CD, back when I was doing an hour and a half commute each way. I discovered that I really don't absorb things as well audibly. I'll have to go back and read the books.

I have a few Kindle books on my phone, mostly things I'll read just a few times or something like a cookbook, that works best when it's portable. I can't see me digitizing all my books, any more that I've managed to digitize all my music.

Posted by: notsothoreau at February 17, 2013 01:32 PM (Lqy/e)

285 @219 "Yep, I learned long ago if you read the book, the movies will piss you off." Mostly true. Lost Horizons was a better movie thanthe (short, mediocre) book. The Illustrated Man was a better movie thanthe (short, good) book.

I read The Gulag Archepelago V. I when it first appeared in paperback. I was in the Navy when the second volume appeared in hardback,and reread V. I while waitingfor the paperback version.When V. III appeared in hardback, I reread V. I and V. II while waiting for the paper V. III.On average, I read the whole thing twice.

Solzhenitsyn is great. With threeexceptions (Apricot Jam,The Solzhenitsyn Reader, and the revised August,1914) I have read every Solzhenitsyn work that I can find that's been transleted into English. The Brits made a good movie out of One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch. Solzhenitsyn did not care for Hollywood's version of The Cancer Ward.

Second the Grossman, Life and Fate, nomination.

Posted by: Malcolm Kirkpatrick at February 17, 2013 01:35 PM (dITBI)

286 "So, what fat books have you guys read and enjoyed?"

Marlborough by Winston Churchill.

An awesome education in thinking politically, and as an added bonus, you get to read about the French having their asses handed to them constantly and continually.

Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville.

Best book written about America by a non-American and essentially reading for those of us living in a time of creeping soft-despotism.

Posted by: MSYB at February 17, 2013 01:36 PM (GMxQL)

287 #274

That is correct. I'm amazed it was over 180 comments before coming up.

Supposedly there was a paper shortage and the publisher was very reluctant to commit to such a monster from a guy then mainly known for academic works. Breaking it up into three volumes made it more manageable in terms of sunk costs. Even then, it was the better part of a decade before it became a big seller.

Posted by: epobirs at February 17, 2013 01:38 PM (kcfmt)

288 "The Good Earth" by Pearl Buck. Read it in high school. Paperback was so fat I cut it in half with scissors so it wouldn't weigh my backpack down carting it back and forth every day.

Posted by: Cornfusedyetagain at February 17, 2013 01:44 PM (8XYwJ)

289
I read "Atlas Shrugged" in hardcover when I was in high school. Got a big reaction from everyone while carrying it around.

I recently read "Les Miserables" though I read it on my Nook. Huge book, much of it skippable crap about the Battle of Waterloo and the history of French convents, but the basic story is really wonderful and well told.

Posted by: rockmom at February 17, 2013 01:46 PM (O/Ize)

290

I'll have to grab some Michener at the library Tuesday. The Adult Winter Reading Program hands out rewards for pages consumed. It's not like when I was a kid and the librarians refused to give me points for reading books they thought were too easy for me, but as the genius who lives in my closet says, "They make the rules" and I WILL game this system. Lol.


Today I'm re-reading Crichton's Next before it goes into the donate box.

Posted by: HeatherRadish™ drinking heavily at February 17, 2013 12:54 PM (hO8IJ)

I live in Michener's hometown and our local library is named for him. Needless to say, I have read all of his books, even the mediocre ones like "Texas" are better than a lot of stuff out there.

Posted by: rockmom at February 17, 2013 01:49 PM (O/Ize)

291 I'm currently reading Hernstein and Murray, The Bell Curve, which contains a lot to chew over. I'll finish it before I finish Hutt's The Keynesian Episode, which I have beenreading in snippets for over five years. I find Hutt's opaque and obscure writing style really annoying, even if I agree (when I can figure out what he's saying).

Posted by: Malcolm Kirkpatrick at February 17, 2013 01:51 PM (dITBI)

292 Another 'Fat Book', or books actually, is "The Bible" by Isaac Asimov. You can find it in 2 volumes (Old Testament, New Testament), or in a single volume. He goes through each book, and comments on it. Very interesting.

Not sure I've ever seen that mentioned here on the Book Thread.

Posted by: HH at February 17, 2013 01:58 PM (XXwdv)

293 There was a time when I would roam the shelves with an eye to thickness of the volumes. As a voracious reader kid there was a fairly limited selection of science fiction novels, just a lot of novellas that had first appeared serialized in magazines. And much of the noels were collected serials that had been expanded a bit to get the page count up past 125 in paperback.

The need for a regular income kept many of the writers from working at a more satisfying length. The collapse of the magazine market can be chronologically mapped against the rising page count of genre novels. For a very long time a lengthy novel like Dune was a real rarity on the SF shelves.

And there was a general lack of good material. Most book stores had a fairly small section and in 1976 I could go in a store and find I had read damn near everything they had to offer. Used bookstores helped some by offering stuff that was out of print but all too often there was a reason an item was out of print.

Back in those days everything that was any good got read at least twice, so it made sense to keep as many books as I could stuff in my room. Nowadays, space is a huge problem and I'm just as happy to have a 600 KB file as a lump of paper. I'm not missing dead tree books at all, along with finding out a previous reader of a library book liked to read while eating or used the book as a tissue.

Posted by: epobirs at February 17, 2013 01:59 PM (kcfmt)

294 There was a piece in the National Lampoon many years ago about Marvel Comics hiring a bunch of big name novelist to write comics. (The same writers also used the idea on the studio seeking new input on 'Leave It To Beaver' in 'The Beaver Papers.')

The best part was Michener taking on the Silver Surfer in an epic story of his home planet entitled 'Zenn-La.' The project fails when artist John Buscema quits after reading Micheners notes for the opening segment. "He wanted me to draw 40 pages of rocks!"

Posted by: epobirs at February 17, 2013 02:04 PM (kcfmt)

295 Fat books I've read include the complete Sherlock Holmes, the dead-tree version then later on Kindle. Good stuff. More recently Anna Karenina and David Copperfield.

Currently reading The Black Prism that clocks in at a mere 780 pages, good so far. Also listening to an audio book of March Upcountry by Weber and Ringo, first of the Prince Roger series, also good so far.

Posted by: waelse1 at February 17, 2013 02:04 PM (uYACz)

296 For the Patrick O'Brien fans there is an unfinished 21st story, available used for only a few bucks on Amazon.

Posted by: Retread at February 17, 2013 02:08 PM (zxitI)

297 The High Cost of Free Parking.

Great book, and pretty high on the geek index, I think.

Posted by: Whoever this is, it's definitely not Michael at February 17, 2013 02:11 PM (YCoZC)

298 Posted by: epobirs at February 17, 2013 02:04 PM (kcfmt)

Speaking of which...there is a book out called "DRUNK, STONED, BRILLIANT, DEAD" about Nat Lamp. By Rick Meyerowitz. I picked it up a couple of weeks ago. Haven't read it yet, but it seems to cover the whole history of the mag.

Oddly enough, it was the title that attracted me.

Posted by: HH at February 17, 2013 02:15 PM (XXwdv)

299 There were three thousand six hundred and fifty-three days like that in his stretch, from the first clang of the rail to the last clang of the rail.

Three thousand six hundred and fifty-three days.

The three extra days were for leap years.

...That has got to be one of the top five most chilling book endings of all time. Sends chills down my spine every time.

As for fat books, I'll go with LotR for my favorite.

Posted by: Mrs. Peel at February 17, 2013 02:21 PM (rO7vb)

300 Fat books I've enjoyed-War and Peace, Anna Karenina, most things I've read by historcal fictions writers James Michener Edward Rutherfurd and Kenneth Roberts.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 17, 2013 02:35 PM (PxYrx)

301 I don't think it was that fat of a book but it was historical fiction and it was, IMO, dreadful-"The Other Boleyn Girl" by Phillipa Gregory. I really like the Tudor period. I couldn't stand the way the characters were portrayed in that book, aside from the historical inaccuracies. I know some people who have loved her books but-based on that one, I wouldn't buy another one.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 17, 2013 02:42 PM (PxYrx)

302 I've read a lot of the big books mentioned, including almost all of Michener's.

Here are some interesting reads in fat books which have not been mentioned:

Quo Vadis by Henryk Sienkiewicz (early Roman Christianity and martyrs, takes some getting used to the formal language but much better reading than the cheesy movie with Victor Mature would indicate)

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich by William Shirer

The Arms of Krupp by William Shirer (history of the German arms manufacturer who made Big Bertha)

The Thousand Hour Day by W.S. Kuniczak (Detailed, historically accurate novel covering the German invasion of Poland from the Polish perspective. It's out of print but if you can find it it is a good read.)

Posted by: Miss Marple at February 17, 2013 02:47 PM (GoIUi)

303 I quite like the Aubrey/Maturin novels but I haven't read all of them. I think I gave up after the 10th or so.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 17, 2013 02:50 PM (PxYrx)

304 I probably should buy a Kindle. It would save trees, but I agree with the poster above. I'd rather have a book I don't have to worry about slurping tea on (a book won't short out) and that I can fold the pages over on. I would be glad to give away old books or sell them-I can't even fit in my garage I have so many,-but I can't warm up a Kindle

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 17, 2013 02:54 PM (PxYrx)

305 skinny michener:

The Bridge at Andau. Must read.

Posted by: onlyme at February 17, 2013 02:57 PM (J4kQ3)

306 214-Yes, Hollywood did take some liberties. I wrote a letter to Daniel Day Lewis complaining about the most egregious ones involving the romance/sisters. I said "Your father was a writer. Didn't this bother you?" but I never heard back from him. ;^)

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 17, 2013 02:59 PM (PxYrx)

307 Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 17, 2013 02:54 PM (PxYrx)


I used to say the same thing.....until I got a Kindle. I now prefer it to a paper based book. Especially the mass market paperbacks.

Posted by: Vic at February 17, 2013 03:00 PM (53z96)

308
Another "skinny" Michener:

The Bridges at Toko-Ri

Good read, and the movie made from it was fairly faithful to the story.

Good soliloquy by Admiral Tarrant about naval aviators at the end.

"Where do we get such men...."

Posted by: Reader C.J. Burch writes.... at February 17, 2013 03:12 PM (RFeQD)

309 More on fat books. I enjoyed reading Dickens and have read his novels quite a few times but he generally stank at writing female characters. They are either humorous or weird.evil caricatures or they're angelic figures. Considering his own messed up personal life it's not a surprise his women characters leave a lot to be desired, but it's a disappointment nevertheless.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 17, 2013 03:16 PM (PxYrx)

310 I haven't read through all 309 posts yet but thought I would add "Gone With The Wind," a huge novel but the best I have ever read. Another good one (and fat): Forever Amber by Kathleen Winsor. And can't forget Poland (James Michener) which is one of his best.

Posted by: Bookie at February 17, 2013 03:29 PM (jpnyE)

311 I liked "The Source" but I thought it was weak at the end—the late 19th and 20th century stuff.

Posted by: moviegique at February 17, 2013 03:32 PM (wir87)

312 Lincolntf:

http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Infinite_jest

Posted by: Stumbo at February 17, 2013 03:42 PM (xybzh)

313 161 Hey, if you want, you could give me a page number and paragraph for
what you find, put in on a word document and E-mail it to me,


----------

Ain't got page numbers 'cause I'm reading the e-book. I'll give you enough surrounding text so you can find it.


Posted by: Assault Citizen Anachronda at February 17, 2013 03:42 PM (1c58W)

314 Henry Miller meets Woody Allen in Paris; on Kindle: "Down Among the Dead Men."

Posted by: Gravity's Rainbow at February 17, 2013 03:49 PM (SJJMA)

315 I quite like the Aubrey/Maturin novels but I haven't read all of them. I think I gave up after the 10th or so.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at February 17, 2013 02:50 PM (PxYrx)
Of the 20 novels in the series, the best are the first four (Master Commander, Post Captain, HMS Surprise, The Mauritius Command) plus the 11th and 12th (The Reverse of the Medal, The Letter of Marque). If you've already read through the 10th novel (The Far Side of the World), I'd highly recommend continuing for another two.

Posted by: DKCZ at February 17, 2013 03:56 PM (9/bcB)

316
I used to say the same thing.....until I got a Kindle. I now prefer it
to a paper based book. Especially the mass market paperbacks.


I used to feel the same way...I preferred dead tree, hold in my hands, real books. Now I carry around a 2000 volume library that weighs about six ounces. Whatever I'm in the mood to read, I have...wherever I go. From Mark Twain's 'Grandfather's Old Ram', to Joseph Conrad's "(Word that Rhymes With 'Bigger') of the 'Narcissus'", to John Scalzi's "Old Man's War". I wouldn't trade this away for anything.

Sigh, trying to reply, and my message looks like spam? Srsly? Edited...let's see what happens.


Posted by: Sticky Wicket at February 17, 2013 04:03 PM (KESFj)

317
Longest book - Wheel of Time, Robt. Jordan (et al.). 13 volumes, weighing in at 800-900 pages apiece. Stil have two to go, but I own the whole set (to date) in hardback. How's that for dedication?
The Aubrey-Maturin series is another good read - I think I have them all, except volume 2 which I lent and never got back. Nobody steals your books but your friends, right?

Posted by: Surellin at February 17, 2013 04:03 PM (/JVXl)

318 Of the 20 novels in the series, the best are the first four (Master
Commander, Post Captain, HMS Surprise, The Mauritius Command) plus the
11th and 12th (The Reverse of the Medal, The Letter of Marque). If
you've already read through the 10th novel (The Far Side of the World),
I'd highly recommend continuing for another two.


The Wine Dark Sea is also particularly good....the description of the storm is repeated verbatim from a handwritten log of the event.

Posted by: Sticky Wicket at February 17, 2013 04:20 PM (KESFj)

319 The Aubrey-Maturin series is another good read - I think I have them
all, except volume 2 which I lent and never got back. Nobody steals your
books but your friends, right?


I lent Master and Commander out...never got it back....and when I went to purchase a replacement, instead of having the iconic cover art....it was emblazoned with a picture of what's his name from the movie, gripping a rope, and looking serious.

Posted by: Sticky Wicket at February 17, 2013 04:23 PM (KESFj)

320 Re fat books, if book series count, I'd second all of the recommendations of Patrick O'Brien's Aubrey-Maturin books, all twenty volumes of them.

On a more "literary" level, I'd heartily recommend Anthony Powell's Dance to the Music of Time, a series of 12 novels (later packed into 4 volumes), which has one of the weirdest and most chilling depictions of 1960s era radicals near the end. Along the same vein, and covering almost the same period in history, but more readable, are C.P. Snow's long series of books (I think there are 11 of them), under the group title of Strangers and Brothers -- the best is a portrait of bitter academic politics called The Masters.

Finally, to cite an American, the single best book about World War II I've ever read is a "fat" novel by James Gould Cozzens called Guard of Honor, which won the Pulitzer in 1948.

All of these could be considered "conservative" novels, and for that reason, if folks like us don't read them, you can forget about them ever seeing the light of day in a college classroom.

P.S. Thanks to Oregon Muse for the book plug!

Posted by: The Regular Guy at February 17, 2013 04:31 PM (nov+8)

321
#89 - Anyone got any recommendations in the following categories?

1. Mind-blowing space and universe
2. Rise of communism and socialism in Europe
For #1 check out Vernor Vinge's Fire Upon the Deep.
Another good thick book, in the non-fiction political category is Whittaker Chamber's Witness. Not only is it true, and topical, but it is actually written well.
My all time favorite fat book though is Lord of the Rings.

Posted by: PagodaMaster at February 17, 2013 04:48 PM (N0osC)

322 Fat books I have read, and liked:

"War and Peace", Tolstoy, for my freshman lit class in college, 1974. I think my paperback copy was around 2000 pages. Would never have read it on my own, but a great read. Has it all love, war, old folks, young folks, Napoleon. Oh, kitchen sink too.

"Bleak House", Dickens, a skinny little girl compared to W&P, but my paperback was over 1000 pages long. Read it on my own. Has a case of spontaneous human combustion! How cool is that.

Posted by: jbarntt at February 17, 2013 04:56 PM (UNFot)

323 1. Mind-blowing space and universe

Try David Weber's Honor Harrington series.

Posted by: Vic at February 17, 2013 04:57 PM (53z96)

324 Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

It is a very engaging read. Solzhenitsyn does a good job of drawing you into the world of the Gulag so you get not just a sense of what the particular gulags were like in a technical sense, but in a spiritual sense as well...

Posted by: The Political Hat at February 17, 2013 05:18 PM (Vk2pI)

325 Fat books? Just tear out a few pages and and toss it in a fire and it'll be skinny in no time.

Posted by: Michelle Obama at February 17, 2013 05:21 PM (Vk2pI)

326 ElKomandante: Anyone got any recommendations in the following categories?

1. Mind-blowing space and universe
2. Rise of communism and socialism in Europe

Try 'Use of Weapons' Iain M. Banks --excellent!

Posted by: Bookie at February 17, 2013 05:24 PM (jpnyE)

327 I read the Ring trilogy of J.R.R. Tolkien a week before finals in my sophomore year at UC Berkeley. Could not put it down. My room mates were drinking each other under the table with vodka and root beer (Russians vs Germans) puking all the next day. Could not stop or put the books down.
I did well on my finals despite the distractions that week......

Posted by: Alaska Paul at February 17, 2013 05:35 PM (70OQv)

328 #313

On Kindle use the Location number. This is identical no matter what type of device or display size you reading from. Which is why they have it.

Posted by: epobirs at February 17, 2013 05:44 PM (kcfmt)

329 Oregon Muse,

This is not the first time I've thought we were kindred spirits. I am not a Michener fan, but when I read The Source about 10 years ago, it blew me away. I count it among my top 5 favorite novels of all time.

Others include:

Kristin Lavransdatter, by Sigrid Undset (3 volumes)

The Mark of the Lion trilogy, by Francine Rivers (3 volumes)

The Narnia Chronicles, by C.S. Lewis (7 volumes)

The Brothers Karamazov, by Dostoyevsky (1 big, fat volume)

Posted by: Kathy from Kansas at February 17, 2013 05:49 PM (F0o5k)

330 Pagoda Master,

I'm with you 110% on Whittaker Chambers's "Witness." I would definitely say it's one of the best books I've ever read, and certainly my favorite autobiography.

I wish I could make it required reading for every high-school and/or college student in America. Not only for permanent inoculation against Communism, but for the look inside the mind of one of the most humane, truly civilized, gentle-souled but courageous men of the century.

Posted by: Kathy from Kansas at February 17, 2013 05:54 PM (F0o5k)

331 Another good thick book, in the non-fiction political category is Whittaker Chamber's Witness. Not only is it true, and topical, but it is actually written well.

Hear, hear. A great book by a great and courageous man.

Funny story... Witness is the book that essentially drove me out of academia to more gainful employment. I was interviewing for an assistant professor job at a big state university English Department, and they asked me what non-fiction book I would assign as literature. I waxed poetic about Witness. It was as if I had farted.

Not a lot of anti-communists in English Departments, in other words.

Posted by: The Regular Guy at February 17, 2013 06:00 PM (nov+8)

332 Sharon Kay Penman's _The Sunne in Splendour_--it's a novel of Richard III and timely, given the recent news of locating his remains.

It's somewhere around 800 pp and some of the best parts are the battlefield scenes, which, if you're any kind of geek like me, will whet your appetite for detail without boring the pants off those less inclined to such descriptions.

I believe it is about to be re-released, though I am unsure if there will be any changes or additions to the book. Sharon Kay Penman keeps a FB page and accepts friend requests. She tries to keep people up to date on what's going on.

Also, "The Merlin Trilogy" as they are called:
--The Crystal Cave
--The Hollow Hills
--The Last Enchantment

...all by Mary Stewart. There's a fourth one called _The Wicked Day_, though when I read it in high school it didn't capture me quite as much as the other had done. I think it also wasn't quite as successful as the others.

Posted by: Lisl at February 17, 2013 06:23 PM (Ip7d8)

333 Also, "The Merlin Trilogy" as they are called:

--The Crystal Cave

--The Hollow Hills

--The Last Enchantment

----------------------------



I loved that series.

Posted by: Vic at February 17, 2013 06:33 PM (53z96)

334
The Gulag Archipelago depicts life in hell. Not in any metaphorical sense, but real live earthly hell. The though of death of many was this "worse then here, it won't be".

Posted by: deepred at February 17, 2013 06:39 PM (rUiSC)

335 Just finished Amy Lynn and now have to wait for the next book.


Come on OSP get crackin'.

Posted by: Vic at February 17, 2013 06:45 PM (53z96)

336 Any of the Game of Thrones series is lengthy, but great in my opinion. I thought The Stand was just as long as it needed to be; the villain might have been meh, but the characters and how they handled the post-apocalyptic world were really interesting. I admire King's character development. He is outstanding at fully developed characters, even if they're usually unforgivably homely if they make it into a movie. Harry Potter, Atlas Shrugged, Gone with the Wind are all great long books/series. The later Harry Potter books are freaking huge. Oh, and The Three Musketeers. Loooong book, but Dumas' humor stands the test of time.

Posted by: Sentry at February 17, 2013 06:49 PM (pjBvs)

337 Kristin Lavransdatter, by Sigrid Undset

^^^^
This. It's a story about children that do what they want, making bad choices and marrying the wrong person. She got a Pulitzer for this and all of her works are excellent.

Posted by: notsothoreau at February 17, 2013 07:48 PM (Lqy/e)

338
"So, what fat books have you guys read and enjoyed?"

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson, and all 3 books of The Baroque Cycle. Well worth the time.

Continue reading

Posted by: disa at February 17, 2013 07:57 PM (R+h7Q)

339 Fat books I have read ---

The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich (great book, well-written, even entertaining, for such a somber read)

Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace (a brutally sad, honest, and funny book about addiction, addiction, America, and addiction. Yes, even the humor is mostly just brutal.)

The Pale King by David Foster Wallace - a beautiful, compassionate novel about boredom and the ecstatic enlightenment that can be found therein)

Posted by: Pastorius at February 17, 2013 09:34 PM (gMAUH)

340 First 1000+ page book I read was "Gone with the Wind" when I was 11. Next one, I think was "The Stand" by Stephen King. I really liked "Les Miserables" but it was a force of will to get through the whole thing. Read Vol 1 of the Gulag Archipelago - I have the others, but can only take so much of that at a time. My version of Dostoyevski's "Brothers Karamazov" is huge, but the biggest books waiting to be read on my shelf right now are probably "Kristin Lavransdotter" by Sigrid Undset, "The Way We Live Now" by Anthony Trollope, and "Alexander Schmorell / Christoph Probst: Gesammelte Briefe" by Christiane Moll - a little "light" reading to make sure I don't forget the German language.

Posted by: Katja at February 18, 2013 04:30 AM (9Ymq7)

341 @337 - Just saw your comment about KL. I think she actually won a Nobel in literature for it, rather than a Pulitzer. I'm very interested in the literary movement "renouveau Catholique" that it was part of

Posted by: Katja at February 18, 2013 04:45 AM (9Ymq7)

342
Oh, boy - fat books that I have read. In high school I read all of Tolstoy's War and Peace, from cover to cover, of my own free will. Liked it very much, although I admit skimming over the dry philosophical parts. Very much later, Wouk's Winds of War. Yes, I liked fat books. (read The Source, also - very neatly constructed, I thought.)
I likefat booksso much that I even wrote one, although technically it was released first as three single volumes. My publisher put out a hardbound edition of The Adelsverein Trilogy, which has as many words in it as Lord of the Rings!

Posted by: Sgt. Mom at February 18, 2013 09:12 AM (PvxhO)

343 The Holy Bible (King James Version). It takes a while but it's only 1200 pages.

A Dance to the Music of Time by Anthony Powell (English author)12 novels that make 1 novel. Widmerpool is one of the great characters in English literature. Comic, brilliant.

Proust's A la Recherche du Temps Perdu. I read it in French and English but the newish translation (1980s?) from Random Hoise if I remember correctly is superb. Possibly the best novel ever.

Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (only got through the Fall of Rome -- didn't get to the end of Byzantium 1000 years later). Very scary parallels to our situation today. Great book.

Gulag Archipelago. Solzhenitsyn. Must read.

War and Peace. Tolstoy.

Posted by: Davenport at February 18, 2013 11:30 AM (prReA)

344 Love the dead trees, but moving in the next few years. Again. It's a dilemma.

Posted by: Die Trying at February 18, 2013 11:34 AM (w7J/R)

345 I loved Kristin Lavransdattar, which was originally written in Norwegian I think. There are also sequels.

Posted by: Jean Barker at February 18, 2013 11:47 AM (DAkG1)

346 I have to eagerly second the recommendation on "The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire." So many illustrations of bad policy that we're recreating today in the US.
Got my version on the Kindle for free from Amazon - it might have been a give-away promotion. The porting to ebook is a bit rough in places but it works and a lot easier that lugging the full six volumes.
Gibbon had a slashing sense of dry wit that good for a laugh in places.

Posted by: Whitehall at February 18, 2013 12:28 PM (FmPSC)

347 Kristin Lavransdatter, definitely. But make sure you get the 1999 translation by Tiina Nunnally. The one from the 1920s is all fake-medieval, "hark forsooth!" dialogue and a real struggle to read - plus a lot of stuff was cut out of it.

The Nunnally translation is beautifully clear, and restores everything that was cut the first time. Highly recommended.

Posted by: Anne B. at February 18, 2013 02:27 PM (gZ98W)

348 noblehouse, atlas shrugged, shogun..and why on earth did i read blindness? that was just hard to read, not necessarily big.

Posted by: kvjsbarandgrill at February 18, 2013 06:45 PM (kNiw0)

349 @343 Oh boy! I feel silly now. I have read the entire Bible, Orthodox Study Bible version (Old & New Testaments including Apocrypha.) I knew it was something I ought to do, and so I did it 10 pages at a time (10 pages taking approximately 1/2 hour). The Old Testament, in particular, seems to have so many parallels to things going on today that it's kind of creepy.

Posted by: Katja at February 18, 2013 11:42 PM (9Ymq7)






Processing 0.21, elapsed 0.2106 seconds.
15 queries taking 0.17 seconds, 358 records returned.
Page size 208 kb.
Powered by Minx 0.7 alpha.

MuNuvians
MeeNuvians
Polls! Polls! Polls!
Frequently Asked Questions
The (Almost) Complete Paul Anka Integrity Kick
Top Top Tens
Greatest Hitjobs

The Ace of Spades HQ Sex-for-Money Skankathon
A D&D Guide to the Democratic Candidates
Margaret Cho: Just Not Funny
More Margaret Cho Abuse
Margaret Cho: Still Not Funny
Iraqi Prisoner Claims He Was Raped... By Woman
Wonkette Announces "Morning Zoo" Format
John Kerry's "Plan" Causes Surrender of Moqtada al-Sadr's Militia
World Muslim Leaders Apologize for Nick Berg's Beheading
Michael Moore Goes on Lunchtime Manhattan Death-Spree
Milestone: Oliver Willis Posts 400th "Fake News Article" Referencing Britney Spears
Liberal Economists Rue a "New Decade of Greed"
Artificial Insouciance: Maureen Dowd's Word Processor Revolts Against Her Numbing Imbecility
Intelligence Officials Eye Blogs for Tips
They Done Found Us Out, Cletus: Intrepid Internet Detective Figures Out Our Master Plan
Shock: Josh Marshall Almost Mentions Sarin Discovery in Iraq
Leather-Clad Biker Freaks Terrorize Australian Town
When Clinton Was President, Torture Was Cool
What Wonkette Means When She Explains What Tina Brown Means
Wonkette's Stand-Up Act
Wankette HQ Gay-Rumors Du Jour
Here's What's Bugging Me: Goose and Slider
My Own Micah Wright Style Confession of Dishonesty
Outraged "Conservatives" React to the FMA
An On-Line Impression of Dennis Miller Having Sex with a Kodiak Bear
The Story the Rightwing Media Refuses to Report!
Our Lunch with David "Glengarry Glen Ross" Mamet
The House of Love: Paul Krugman
A Michael Moore Mystery (TM)
The Dowd-O-Matic!
Liberal Consistency and Other Myths
Kepler's Laws of Liberal Media Bias
John Kerry-- The Splunge! Candidate
"Divisive" Politics & "Attacks on Patriotism" (very long)
The Donkey ("The Raven" parody)
News/Chat