Sunday Morning Book Thread 11-04-2012: The Late Halloween Thread [OregonMuse]


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"It lumbered slobberingly into sight and gropingly squeezed Its gelatinous green immensity through the black doorway into the tainted outside air of that poison city of madness."
--H.P. Lovecraft

Good morning all. Thanks to all of you who commented or emailed condolences to me last week on the death of my parents. Looks like it's going to take some months to sort through everything, but we're working through it.


The Horror!

So, what creeps you out?

Perhaps I'm not the guy to do a Halloween thread, because I don't creep out much anymore (except perhaps for things like this). Seriously, I firmly believe and understand more clearly as time goes on, is that Jesus Christ has routed Satan, once and for all. Yes, death is a horror, and Jesus Himself wept when He saw it up close (cf. John 11:1-45), but He has conquered death, so we no longer have to dread it. So ghosts and zombies and vampires and skeletons don't really bother me all that much.

It's either that or maybe it's because I've just gotten old and my senses have become dull. That's always a possibility.

The last time I was seriously creeped out was several ago when I saw zipping around on the internets and stumbled upon something called Victorian post-mortem photography. For those of you who aren't familiar with this, photography was a new technology back in the late 19th-early 20th century, so quite often when someone would die, their family would remember that they had no photograph of the the deceased. So, to remedy this, they would perhaps take a photograph of the deceased lying in their open casket, which wasn't so bad, but then they would get more elaborate, propping them up in chairs, or on a couch next to some actual living family members, and sometimes the photographer would clumsily retouch the eyes of the dead guy to make them look like they're open and living, but they look like cartoon eyes which only made them look even creepier. They even had metal frames in which the corpse could be placed to look like they were standing up on their own.

Some of the photographs are of dead children being held one last time by their parents and the looks of grief and anguish in their faces is heart-rending.

There was one I saw of an 8-10 year old girl next to her dead brother, and the photographer placed the boy's arm around the back of her neck and down over her shoulder, and the expression on her face was like, "Get. Me. The Hell. Out of this. Now." Totally disturbing.

And in some of these old photos, the dead guys look kind of ripe, like they ought to have been buried already.

From this, I've learned that if you ever come across a large group photograph taken during those early years, and there's one guy over on the side who looks like he's peacefully sleeping in a chair or on the end of a sofa, he's most likely not asleep; rather, he's probably dead. DEAD! Mwahahaha!

But, enough of this. Now for some of this:

Moar horror!

Let's start off with some old-school horror, namely, H. P. Lovecraft. Pretty much every one of his horror stories are in this $2.99 Kindle edition. My personal favorite is "Shadow over Innsmouth", but of course "The Call of Cthulhu" is mandatory reading. Also, I would like to give a shout out to "Nyarlathotep", a story that doesn't really go anywhere or do much of anything, but in only 2 pages, Lovecraft manages to create a totally disturbing atmosphere of chaos, despair, and madness. Lovecraft is a lot like Tolkien in that both authors wrote their stories to fit within a consistently defined, well worked-out universe of their own devising.

I don't know very much about modern horror authors. I haven't read any other than Stephen King. King has written a ton of books, but if you only have time to read one them, I think that one book should be The Stand. I first read it nearly 30 years ago and it is an amazingly effective end-of-the-world story. However, since it's original publication, King has gone all George Lucas on it and added something like 500(!) pages of additional material. I don't know if this new material actually adds anything to the novel or is just useless bloat.

Minor spoiler: My favorite scene is where one of the main characters has to get out of New York City on foot, so he makes his way to the (I think) Holland Lincoln Tunnel which is all jammed up with cars that were prevented from leaving the city by an Army blockade that was set up to contain the spread of the plague. Naturally, there's no power and all the lights are out, so he has to make his way in the pitch black, threading his way among the cars and trying not to look at the dead people in them. And everything is dark and deathly quiet.

When suddenly...

Behind him...

He hears...

A sound.

Thirty years later, this scene is still vivid in my mind.

And there's also the Walking Dead graphic novels, which I haven't read, but apparently it's still an ongoing series. My son tells me that at one point they got a new artist, so the recent books look completely different than the earlier ones.

This isn't horror as such, but close enough: more than one of John Collier's short stories have been made into Twilight Zone episodes. The main collection of his stories has been out of print, but is now available on Kindle. I first heard about this author from one of my English teachers back in high school and I've enjoyed his stories ever since.

Recommendations From Morons

And speaking of zombie books, moron commenter and author 'weft cut-loop' has written his own tale of the zombie apocalypse, My Last Testament. One of the reviews on Amazon says this:

Reading zombie novels is supposed to be fun - and this one delivers in spades. Bloody, pus-filled, brain-splattering spades. When your half hour lunch break extends to an hour every day because you can't put the book down, you know you're onto something. The descriptions and characters are written so well, it makes suspending disbelief a breeze. You can't imagine the variety of situations the main character finds himself in...and the zombies aren't the only villains he's fighting.

And the Kindle edition is only 99 cents, so help a brother out, eh?

Mr. Weft is also the author The Warrior or God, which I've mentioned in previous threads. It's an end-of-the-world novel that reads as if it were written by an AoSHQ moron. Which it was. Skull-f*cking, milf-chasing, rape, dismemberment, murder, weapons of mass destruction, war, forced orgasms, and much more, all infused with a conservative mindset.

Greg recommends another zombie book, Feed, by Mira Grant, the first of the 'Newsflesh' trilogy.

I've got one recommendation for the horrific, end-of-the-world story Greener Than You Think by Ward Moore. Link is to a free Gutenberg copy.

Moron commenter 'and irresolute' likes The Keep by F. Paul Wilson and also mentions that there's a supernatural element that runs all through Wilson's 'Repairman Jack' series.

Rickshaw Jack is afraid that his favorite horror novel, 'The Hyde effect' by Steve Vance is out of print, but that isn't so; you can still get it as a Kindle edition, and it's inexpensive to boot.

Also mentioned was "A Night in the Lonesome October" by Roger Zelazny, which appears to pack just about every Halloween theme you can think of into it's pages. Zelazny has always been one of my favorite sci-fi authors, but alas, not many of his works have been converted to eBook format, and this one is no exception.

Commenter Judge Roy Bean asks me to put in a word for Clive Barker's Books of Blood series. He mentions many of these short stories, such as Candyman and Raw Head Rex, were made into movies. Also that each Book of Blood actually is a collection of 4-5 shorter stories and the first volume has a story called 'Book of Blood" that loosely ties all the stories together and is also included as a prologue in each of the books.

Lastly, here's a disturbing, end-of-the-world poem:

Darkness

by George Gordon, AKA Lord Byron

I had a dream, which was not all a dream.
The bright sun was extinguish'd, and the stars
Did wander darkling in the eternal space,
Rayless, and pathless, and the icy earth
Swung blind and blackening in the moonless air;
Morn came and went--and came, and brought no day,
And men forgot their passions in the dread
Of this their desolation; and all hearts
Were chill'd into a selfish prayer for light:
And they did live by watchfires--and the thrones,
The palaces of crowned kings--the huts,
The habitations of all things which dwell,
Were burnt for beacons; cities were consum'd,
And men were gather'd round their blazing homes
To look once more into each other's face;
Happy were those who dwelt within the eye
Of the volcanos, and their mountain-torch:
A fearful hope was all the world contain'd;
Forests were set on fire--but hour by hour
They fell and faded--and the crackling trunks
Extinguish'd with a crash--and all was black.
The brows of men by the despairing light
Wore an unearthly aspect, as by fits
The flashes fell upon them; some lay down
And hid their eyes and wept; and some did rest
Their chins upon their clenched hands, and smil'd;
And others hurried to and fro, and fed
Their funeral piles with fuel, and look'd up
With mad disquietude on the dull sky,
The pall of a past world; and then again
With curses cast them down upon the dust,
And gnash'd their teeth and howl'd: the wild birds shriek'd
And, terrified, did flutter on the ground,
And flap their useless wings; the wildest brutes
Came tame and tremulous; and vipers crawl'd
And twin'd themselves among the multitude,
Hissing, but stingless--they were slain for food.
And War, which for a moment was no more,
Did glut himself again: a meal was bought
With blood, and each sate sullenly apart
Gorging himself in gloom: no love was left;
All earth was but one thought--and that was death
Immediate and inglorious; and the pang
Of famine fed upon all entrails--men
Died, and their bones were tombless as their flesh;
The meagre by the meagre were devour'd,
Even dogs assail'd their masters, all save one,
And he was faithful to a corse, and kept
The birds and beasts and famish'd men at bay,
Till hunger clung them, or the dropping dead
Lur'd their lank jaws; himself sought out no food,
But with a piteous and perpetual moan,
And a quick desolate cry, licking the hand
Which answer'd not with a caress--he died.
The crowd was famish'd by degrees; but two
Of an enormous city did survive,
And they were enemies: they met beside
The dying embers of an altar-place
Where had been heap'd a mass of holy things
For an unholy usage; they rak'd up,
And shivering scrap'd with their cold skeleton hands
The feeble ashes, and their feeble breath
Blew for a little life, and made a flame
Which was a mockery; then they lifted up
Their eyes as it grew lighter, and beheld
Each other's aspects--saw, and shriek'd, and died--
Even of their mutual hideousness they died,
Unknowing who he was upon whose brow
Famine had written Fiend. The world was void,
The populous and the powerful was a lump,
Seasonless, herbless, treeless, manless, lifeless--
A lump of death--a chaos of hard clay.
The rivers, lakes and ocean all stood still,
And nothing stirr'd within their silent depths;
Ships sailorless lay rotting on the sea,
And their masts fell down piecemeal: as they dropp'd
They slept on the abyss without a surge--
The waves were dead; the tides were in their grave,
The moon, their mistress, had expir'd before;
The winds were wither'd in the stagnant air,
And the clouds perish'd; Darkness had no need
Of aid from them--She was the Universe.


My, wasn't that cheerful?


So that about wraps it up for this week. As always, book thread tips may be sent to aoshqbookthread@gmail.com

So what have you all been reading this past week?

Posted by: Open Blogger at 10:49 AM



Comments

1 Mitt Romney is killing it this morning in des moines. Kiiiiilllllling it.

I've really only been reading short politics this week. And last week. And the week before.

Been a loooong campaign.

Posted by: Truman North at November 04, 2012 10:56 AM (I2LwF)

2 I never have been big into the horror genre. Too much of that around in real life.

We got a number of books from a friend of my wife who is moving to TX. I have been working on some of those this week.


The Story of America from the Readers Digest. Absolutely horrid book. It is shallow, inaccurate and liberal to the core. It could have been written by the current Obamanite regime. I had to put it down before I threw it through the TV.


Also from Readers Digest Story of The Great American West. Also PC crap but not as bad as the above book. Both of thedse books are what I would consider “coffee table” books heavy on pictures and diagrams and light on facts.

Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 10:57 AM (YdQQY)

3 forced orgasms,

was CharlieBrown'sDildo involved?

Posted by: chemjeff at November 04, 2012 10:58 AM (d/5qf)

4 I did like The Stand. I'm not sure though I would classify that as "horror". It kind of fits more into an apocalyptic SF genre, with religious overtones.

Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 11:00 AM (YdQQY)

5 I'm a big DeMille fan. Anyone read The Panther yet?

Posted by: Liberty Lover at November 04, 2012 11:00 AM (b4W5O)

6 Forced orgasms is the subject of both bad horror and bad pron.

The thing that scares me the most is trying something I think I'm good at and screwing it up. The moral is, Never Try.

Posted by: Truman North, 315-217 at November 04, 2012 11:02 AM (I2LwF)

7 It's nice to hear some positivity in a leader!

Posted by: Infidel at November 04, 2012 11:02 AM (prnik)

8 Also, small objects scare me. Miniature corn-- what is that???

Posted by: Truman North, 315-217 at November 04, 2012 11:03 AM (I2LwF)

9 R-Money is gettin the hang of this campaign thingy.

Posted by: Infidel at November 04, 2012 11:04 AM (prnik)

10 Okay, if we're going to talk Cthulhu - as in, actual Cthulhu and not just the mythos or the game - I recommend digging into this: http://arxiv.org/abs/1210.8144

Yes, the man uploaded that eldritch abomination into the arXiv. The FOOL!

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 11:04 AM (nt30N)

11 Most Stephen King horror isn't really horror. More like, man versus the weird.

Posted by: Truman North, 315-217 at November 04, 2012 11:05 AM (I2LwF)

12 Romney, again, is absolutely killing it in Des Moines.

Posted by: Truman North, 315-217 at November 04, 2012 11:05 AM (I2LwF)

13 I'll admit: Mirrors in the dark kinda give me the willies.

Posted by: Secundus at November 04, 2012 11:06 AM (/c/4B)

14 I never know if I'm supposed to move to the book thread or not.

Fine, I started rereading Dune last night. Does that count as a book comment?

Posted by: Dave in Fla at November 04, 2012 11:07 AM (dX4hn)

15 As opposed to the chocolate jesus. Faker.

Posted by: Infidel at November 04, 2012 11:07 AM (prnik)

16 Sliver of comfort on the Irish bookmaker thats already paying out on a Barky win:

Bookmakers Paddy Power pays out early on Woods - and loses £1.3m
Tiger Woods' defeat at the US PGA Championship has cost bookmakers Paddy Power £1.3million after they paid out early on the world No.1 winning the tournament.

Posted by: Up with people at November 04, 2012 11:08 AM (vj51i)

17 I've been re-reading some Lord Dunsany (for free!) I downloaded from Project Gutenberg. Also some astronomy stuff, courtesy exoplanet.eu.

I love the arXiv; they store the preprints of sciency stuff that otherwise you'd have to pay for, or sneak into a university for.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 11:09 AM (nt30N)

18 Conan Doyle wrote some good short stories, all available on Gutenberg, "Tales of Terror and Mystery."

Posted by: George Orwell what knows where thou concealest thy þr0n at November 04, 2012 11:09 AM (AZGON)

19 Anyone have a crowd size estimate in Des Moines? I saw the one picture, but you could only see one side of the crowd.

I think Obama drew 4000 here yesterday.

Posted by: Dave in Fla at November 04, 2012 11:10 AM (dX4hn)

20 Stephen king. I have read everything by it and was not actually scared by much. The thing that scared me the most was tommy knockers and pet semetary and I think the latter is the best of his early horror work. This is leaving aside It which was my favorite book for a long long time. But it's long.

I've never cared for salems lot which many people love.

The two thing which scare the bejeebers out of me are aliens and ghosts.

Also ray bradburys Martian chronicles were terrifying to me.

Also Poe. Classic.

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 11:10 AM (TOBhV)

21 Have any of the Morons read the new Weber Honor Harrington book yet? (Shadow of Freedom)

Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 11:11 AM (YdQQY)

22 I recently read the Wool omnibus by Hugh Howey. More post-apocalyptic tale than horror, but I really enjoyed it.

Posted by: Lizzy at November 04, 2012 11:11 AM (78+Nf)

23 Also consider Doyle's anthology "Captain of the Pole-Star."

Posted by: George Orwell what knows where thou concealest thy þr0n at November 04, 2012 11:11 AM (AZGON)

24 Re: The Stand

The biggerified version published in the '90s wasn't a revision, it was a restoration. When the book was originally published way back when, the publisher thought it was too long and it would be more expensive than people would be willing to pay.

In the intro to the larger version, King said something like "People won't be doing different things, they'll just be doing more things."

I like King and have pretty much his whole collection (Wind Through the Keyhole has been sitting around, unread, for a few months).

Like his writing, even if he is a major libtard.

And when it comes to creepy, I really don't like to read his short story "The Boogeyman" unless there's other people around.


Posted by: CaptainComic at November 04, 2012 11:11 AM (JG2ty)

25 Ok, I'm a big fan of battlegroundwatch website. I'm supporting Romney Ryan. I believe they will win. So why am I depressed at Charlie cook, the rest of these lib polls and so many thinking Obama will win the electoral college, but not the voting? And don't get me started on nate silver, that I don't get. Just need reassurance. Thx

Posted by: Dix Handley at November 04, 2012 11:11 AM (gKuGC)

26 Asphyxiation scares me.

Posted by: Truman North at November 04, 2012 11:12 AM (I2LwF)

27 The Exorcist.
The Other (Tom Tryon).

Posted by: goddessoftheclassroom at November 04, 2012 11:12 AM (u3SPb)

28 I know it's cliche but I am freaked out by clowns and dolls. My mom and aunt used to try to give me dolls as a kid and I was like "no thanks!"

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 11:13 AM (TOBhV)

29 Richard Matheson's "Legend of Hell House" is worth a read.

Posted by: George Orwell what knows where thou concealest thy þr0n at November 04, 2012 11:14 AM (AZGON)

30 I'm about halfway through Bernard Lewis' "What Went Wrong?". Good read.

Posted by: Secundus at November 04, 2012 11:14 AM (/c/4B)

31 Asphyxiation scares me.

What's the worst that could happen?

Posted by: David Carradine at November 04, 2012 11:14 AM (nt30N)

32 The scariest book I ever read was the original Bram Stoker Dracula. I was in the 7th grade so that may have had some impact. I also could not put it down.


So if you want a real scary book read that one.

Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 11:14 AM (YdQQY)

33
I guess I'm a nerd....I don't like zombies. Good old fashioned detective novels thrill me.

OT: And guys, please leave your pointy elbows and beer long enough to vote on Tuesday. Don't let these silly girls who think "Obamy be sexy" decide this election. More women vote, although as a woman I question if this should even be a right for some. *Waits for the feministas to come after her with pitchforks*

Posted by: Mo the Girl at November 04, 2012 11:15 AM (B+XCM)

34 BTW that Dracula book is available at Gutenberg free.

Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 11:16 AM (YdQQY)

35 What Went Wrong?

The Closing of the Muslim Mind is another fine book in that genre. I haven't read The Dream Palace of the Arabs yet.

Posted by: David Carradine at November 04, 2012 11:16 AM (nt30N)

36 Seriously, I firmly believe and understand more clearly as time goes on, is that Jesus Christ has routed Satan, once and for all.

Amen. And thank you for that.

One of these days, I plan on getting to Lovecraft. Less internet browsing, more book reading, I always intend.

Posted by: uncommentari at November 04, 2012 11:16 AM (2+Sc2)

37 Oh, and-- Horror books, and no mention of Poe?

Posted by: Secundus at November 04, 2012 11:16 AM (/c/4B)

38 Reading "The Right Stuff" by Tom Wolfe. I know its an older book but its an interesting and well written take on the US space program. I had seen the Hbo series "From Earth to the Moon" a few years back - I assume the tv series borrowed heavily from the book

Posted by: Nc at November 04, 2012 11:16 AM (LmX/s)

39 Fine, I started rereading Dune last night. Does that count as a book comment?
Posted by: Dave in Fla
The stats must flow!

Posted by: Lurking Canuck at November 04, 2012 11:16 AM (Gt8ei)

40 Oops, gotta remove Carradine's sock from my mouth, before I start to enjoy it too much

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 11:16 AM (nt30N)

41 Another reminder for Chicago-area readers -- the meetup is on Tuesday night (Election Night) at 7:00 PM. Log on to the Yahoo Groups AOS board for details.

And now, I'm off to see "Wreck It Ralph" with mini Sassy.

Posted by: Sassy at November 04, 2012 11:17 AM (25Udx)

42 This week was reading a collection of ghost stories by M R James, an Edwardian writer and Cambridge don. It was an Oxford Univ Press hardback but I see much of his work available on the web for free. Well worth checking into. Lovecraft greatly admired him.

Posted by: Leftcoast on a iPhone at November 04, 2012 11:17 AM (RFl8c)

43 The Walking Dead graphic series are some seriously fucked up shit. One of the antagonists is a pedophile who keeps a toothless zombie girl as a sex slave. Whuuuuuuuuuuuut.....

The show though is much better.

Posted by: Christina Hendricks's Mighty Jugs Teams Up With Mitt Romney's Hair to Defeat SCOAMF at November 04, 2012 11:18 AM (+AV7H)

44 Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 11:13 AM (TOBhV)


Ditto and It scared the living crap out of me, though I do think it's when he started phoning it in and going for the gross-out ending.

The SHining and Pet Semetary and possibly Needful Things are my other favorites. Never could get in to The Stand.


Many, many thanks to the Moron/ette who recommended Ilona Andrews. Fun fun stuff.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 11:18 AM (2rMmy)

45 Wolfen scared the shit out of me. I used to work late night shifts, and when I got home, I'd run like a fiend to my front door to get the door open, looking over my shoulder the whole time. It didn't help that the neighbor across the street let his dog roam free. After parking my car one night, I grabbed my purse,turned to the leftto open the car door, and there was the dog - big ol' face just staring at me. Almost peed my pants.

Posted by: joanne counting down the minutes at November 04, 2012 11:18 AM (VNFBf)

46 Dix, we're fine. 315 EVs.

Posted by: Truman North at November 04, 2012 11:18 AM (I2LwF)

47 I was without electricity for a full three days after Sandy. (OK, 70 hours and 54 minutes if you want to be technical about it.)

Since I'm such an internet addict, I tend to buy books faster than I read them. I have a backlog of literally scores of books that sound absolutely fascinating, but which I've never actually gotten around to reading.

So with the power off and no laptop, I was thrown back on my reserve supply of entertainment. I chose "The Pre-Astronauts" by Craig Ryan. It is mainly about the stratospheric balloon flights on the 50s and 60s, but also delves into the history of both ballooning and parachuting.

I wish I'd read it before Felix Baumgartner's recent exploits, but better late than never.

You may recall that Joseph Kittinger was the previous record holder, and he was the old dude who served as Felix's capcom.

Well, I can report to you that while he may be 84 years old today, he is a 24-karat stud. He made five balloon flights into the stratosphere, and was nearly killed in three of them. He set two altitude records, by the way.

On his first high-altitude parachute jump in 1959, from a measly 76,400 feet, his drogue chute wrapped around his body and he went into a flat spin. He blacked out and only regained consciousness when he was sitting on the ground after his reserve chute automatically deployed.

You know what he did? He went right back up there and did it again. TWICE.

Posted by: rickl at November 04, 2012 11:18 AM (sdi6R)

48 Liberty Lover - I'm also a huge DeMille fan. I haven't read The Panther yet, have you? I need to get that one.

Plum Island is one of my favorite all-time books, and I think is the epitome of DeMille's witty and excellent writing. John Corey is a man's man.

His other books are great as well - both in the Long Island vein and in the military investigation vein (Word of Honor, Up Country, etc.)

Posted by: LP at November 04, 2012 11:18 AM (pR8WM)

49 The scariest scene in any book I've ever read was in King's 'salem's Lot. When Danny Glick appears outside the window. To this day, more than 30 years later, I still can't look out a window at night without thinking of Danny Glick.

Posted by: Jaynie59 at November 04, 2012 11:20 AM (4zKCA)

50 Nc, I always liked Wolfe's nonfiction. "From Bauhaus to Our House", "The Painted Word", and "Radical Chic" are all worth reading.

Posted by: Secundus at November 04, 2012 11:20 AM (/c/4B)

51 Much of Lovecraft is available online if money is tight. Which it will certainly be if we lose this thing.

I swear I once heard Obama give a shout-out to "the Deep Ones" and on another occasion he ended a rally with "Iä! Shub-Niggurath!"

Posted by: George Orwell what knows where thou concealest thy þr0n at November 04, 2012 11:21 AM (AZGON)

52 I just saw on RCP that there is poll out today that shows Obama with a 7 point lead....in Maine, and still under 50%. He won by 17 in 2008.

Posted by: tofer732 at November 04, 2012 11:21 AM (m5Iwq)

53 Spiders, Toddlers, Dentists and Cottage Cheese.

THat's what freaks me out.

Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 11:21 AM (pjsQY)

54 Been back to reading the Barsoom books again.

Finally finished Chessmen of Mars. It's like two books joined together at the hips. I wasn't terribly enthused about the first, but the second did OK. Except for one thing that I really expected to happen what didn't.

Most of the way through Mastermind of Mars. Been waiting half the book for a particular shoe to drop, but it didn't.

Book moment that gave me the willies? When the lights came on Rendezvous With Rama.

Posted by: Anachronda at November 04, 2012 11:21 AM (/MCwY)

55
The Walking Dead graphic series are some seriously fucked up shit. One of the antagonists is a pedophile who keeps a toothless zombie girl as a sex slave.

The girls are okay but toothless zombie boys....that is teh HOT!

Posted by: Accused Pedophile Harry Reid at November 04, 2012 11:21 AM (Gt8ei)

56
Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 11:10 AM (TOBhV)

Something Wicked This Way Comes. I caught the Bradbury bug late, in my thirties. This is one of my favorites. Nobody writes like Bradbury.

Posted by: joanne counting down the minutes at November 04, 2012 11:22 AM (VNFBf)

57
Horror book thread two days before the election? Is this some kind of DRUDGE weirdness? I'm still clinging to Barone's pant cuff as he drags me around his kitchen.

Horror.

The Tell-Tale Heart.


Ba-Boomp, Ba-Boomp, Ba-Boomp.

Posted by: Meremortal at November 04, 2012 11:22 AM (1Y+hH)

58 Posted by: Secundus at November 04, 2012 11:16 AM (/c/4B)


Hey I mentioned Poe. But fine just ignore me.

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 11:22 AM (TOBhV)

59 Every newscast should begin with "I'm Barack Obama and I approved this message"

Posted by: kbdabear at November 04, 2012 11:22 AM (wwsoB)

60 ME will go 3 for Obama, 1 for Romney.

Posted by: Truman North at November 04, 2012 11:22 AM (I2LwF)

61 also, I read the Belgariad this week.
Pretty good little Fantasy Series by D. Eddings.

Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 11:22 AM (pjsQY)

62 Plum Island was a great read. The Lion's Game was a shitstain on Demille's otherwise good prose. I read it just before 9/11 too and hadn't ready any book of his since then, that's how bad of a taste it left in my mouth.

Posted by: Christina Hendricks's Mighty Jugs Teams Up With Mitt Romney's Hair to Defeat SCOAMF at November 04, 2012 11:23 AM (+AV7H)

63 I chose "The Pre-Astronauts"

Great book.

Posted by: George Orwell what knows where thou concealest thy þr0n at November 04, 2012 11:23 AM (AZGON)

64
You know what scared me whenI first read it?
Kipling's Rikki-Tikki-Tavi -
I just KNEW that there were snakes out to get ME after that.

Posted by: GT 5.0 at November 04, 2012 11:23 AM (wb/qi)

65 I love love love horror as a literary genre. Hate horror movies but damn if I don't like the books.

I love Stephen King and his son Joe Hill's stuff is pretty good as well.

I second Barker's Books of Blood, there are some real gristly, gory tales in there. I like Barker as a fantasy novelist as well (Great Secret Show, Imajica).

Graham Masterton has also written some novels that have creeped me out.

If you want pure gross-out and shock-horror, go with splatterpunk and Ed Lee. Warning, these are NOT for the feint of heart or weak of stomach. They are purely gross.

A few more authors I like are Scott Nicholson, Jack Kilborn (more thriller with horror elements), Rihannon Frater (awesome zombie series), Scott Sigler and Jack Ketchum.

Posted by: DangerGirl (@deadlyestrogen) at November 04, 2012 11:23 AM (GrtrJ)

66 Ditto on the Clive Barker rec. His older stuff is his best. Weaveworld, while not strictly horror, is still a fabulous yarn (see what I did there?). It's a fantasy-horror blend, and a kick-ass story.

Some of Dan Simmons' horror work is top-notch. Children of the Night, Summer of Night, and Carrion Comfort are all extremely good stories. And Simmons is just a great writer in the end. He makes King look like a hack. Oh, wait!

And the extra 500 pages in The Stand are pointless. King is the perfect example of the old axiom "behind every great writer is a better editor." Those 500 pages were left on the cutting room floor for the original release for a reason: they suck.

Posted by: NukemHill at November 04, 2012 11:24 AM (7WLzC)

67 I have a zombie anthology book, and most of the stories are mediocre at best. The last one I just read was Lovecraft's "Reanimator."

It has its moments. But you can tell it was written as a serial, because he reintroduces his characters, and summarizes the plot with each new "chapter."

I think I need to hit the "Walking Dead" books soon.

Posted by: BurtTC at November 04, 2012 11:25 AM (BeSEI)

68 59 Every newscast should begin with "I'm Barack Obama and I approved this message"


If he wins, they will.

Posted by: George Orwell what knows where thou concealest thy þr0n at November 04, 2012 11:25 AM (AZGON)

69 43 -- I tried reading The Walking Dead graphic novels last year after the AMC tv show came out. For the few first few books it was pretty interesting. But after a while it became overly repetitive, formulaic and depressing. The characters also seemed to make the same mistakes over and over. I think the writer started with a great concept but didn't know where to take it.

Posted by: Nc at November 04, 2012 11:25 AM (LmX/s)

70 Way we haz football thread and pointed elbows and a cheer for the all important game.



Panthers MUST beat Redskins for Mitt to win. 60 year streak.

Posted by: Billy Bob, the guy who drinks in SC at November 04, 2012 11:26 AM (wR+pz)

71 62 - You didn't like the Lion's Game? I enjoyed it.

One of the military-angled DeMille books that I've read several times was Up Country. If you haven't read it, pick it up. If you haven't heard of it, check out the premise of it on Amazon or what have you.

The Charm School was another great one - longer and more serious than his other books, but an interesting read.

Posted by: LP at November 04, 2012 11:26 AM (pR8WM)

72 Request!
Off the horror subject
Any recommendations for a decent accounting of the Navajo Code Talkers?

Thanks!!

Posted by: Red Shirt at November 04, 2012 11:27 AM (FIDMq)

73 Didn't Dan Simmons also write Song of Kali?

that book is TERRIFYING (esp for parents)

I love Clive Barker - am reading Reamde (Stephenson) now and not enjoying - my favorite horror books are Barker and Straub

Posted by: BlackOrchid-StillMissingDagny at November 04, 2012 11:27 AM (J6kXj)

74 Apologies, Custard/Longbow, I looked right past it.

And if Obama is a cultist of any kind, I'd say he worships either Tzeentch or Slaanesh.

Posted by: Secundus at November 04, 2012 11:28 AM (/c/4B)

75 Clowns scare the crap out of me.

Couldn't watch the TV adaptation of "It" due to that.

Lovecraft still rocks, as does Poe.

And King's earlier stuff... in "The Shining," when the kid things what he's seeing isn't real, and closes his eyes, and says, "It's not real, it's not real" and the corpse's fingers wrap around his neck... whoah!

Posted by: GuyfromNH at November 04, 2012 11:28 AM (kbOju)

76 I don't read books, but did Brit Hume just predict an Obama victory?

Posted by: Durka Durka at November 04, 2012 11:28 AM (1crPI)

77 The non-fiction book The Hot Zone by Richard Preston chronicles several cases of the ebola virus (and finding its origin) and it truly scary.

Posted by: Lizzy at November 04, 2012 11:28 AM (78+Nf)

78 50- secundus thx for the recommendation. I will try those.

Posted by: Nc at November 04, 2012 11:28 AM (LmX/s)

79 This discussion of the Walking Dead comix vs. show is interesting - the show is already better - Game of Thrones is similar. Martin has lost his way with the books - he should just stop and let the SERIES go on and finish. write the books after or during.

he's just repeating himself just like Walking Dead comic does

Posted by: BlackOrchid-StillMissingDagny at November 04, 2012 11:29 AM (J6kXj)

80 LP I just downloaded The Panther to my Kindle Fire but didn't start it yet. The first one I read was Up Country. I was hooked after that and have read everything he's written since.

Posted by: Liberty Lover at November 04, 2012 11:29 AM (b4W5O)

81 The Hot Zone is TERRIFYING lizzy!

that's what scares me. epidemiology

Posted by: BlackOrchid-StillMissingDagny at November 04, 2012 11:29 AM (J6kXj)

82 "The Haunting" proved less memorable as a novel than as a movie. The sixties original, not the awful remake.

Mmm. Claire Bloom.

Posted by: George Orwell what knows where thou concealest thy þr0n at November 04, 2012 11:30 AM (AZGON)

83
Panthers MUST beat Redskins for Mitt to win. 60 year streak.

===========
I thought that streak was broken in 2000?

Posted by: USS Diversity at November 04, 2012 11:30 AM (9ghZ6)

84 Used to be a huge fan of Stephen King.Can't stand the guy anymore. Really liked The Stand, tho.

Posted by: joanne counting down the minutes at November 04, 2012 11:31 AM (VNFBf)

85 rickl, Col. Kittinger also flew the Rosie O'Grady's biplane around down here for years, doing skywriting ads for the downtown venue in the late '80's and early '90's.

And, the unabridged The Stand was a great read.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, with laptop dead at November 04, 2012 11:31 AM (lOmbq)

86
I'm a ghost story junkie - got a whole bookcase full of them. Like you, I'm a Christian and occult stuff is strictly forbidden, but when it comes to ghosts... I take the view of Cassius in 'Julius Caesar': "I but believe it partly." And it's the fictional stories I like, not real-life cases; I've hung around magicians a bit, and can see how a lot of this stuff could be faked. Still...mankind has always believed in ghosts, in all times and cultures, and I'm willing to let a tiny sliver of superstition into my belief system, just provisionally.

Anyway, I have several classic anthologies, like "Tales to be Told in the Dark" and "Ghostly Tales to be Told", collected by an anthologist with the glorious name of Basil Davenport.'The Monkey's Paw', and 'The Beast With Five Fingers', 'The Red Lodge' (one of my favourites), and 'Johnson Looked Back' and 'Smoke Ghost' are all great ones.

For novels, I'd put down Shirley Jackson as the scariest writer I've experienced. "The Haunting of Hill House" is genuinely spooky, but the one that creeped me out the most was "We Have Always Lived In The Castle". She's got that thing down perfect, of leaving the reader unsure how much is real and how much is the character sinking into insanity.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 04, 2012 11:31 AM (FkH4y)

87 61 also, I read the Belgariad this week.
Pretty good little Fantasy Series by D. Eddings.
Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 11:22 AM (pjsQY)

Oh my heart. I read that series so many times. It's delightful fun. Don't read anything else by eddings, there's no point.

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 11:31 AM (TOBhV)

88 Liberty Lover, let me know what you think about The Panther. I'll put that on my to-buy list.

I can't rave enough about Up Country. Such an awesome book.

Posted by: LP at November 04, 2012 11:33 AM (pR8WM)

89 If you want to read great modern Lovecraft mythos, check out Cody Goodfellow's Radiant Dawn and Ravenous Dusk.

Posted by: Adam at November 04, 2012 11:33 AM (iGgGd)

90 Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 11:31 AM (TOBhV)

The Redemption of Althalus is pretty good, too.

Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 11:34 AM (pjsQY)

91 Vic, I looked on Amazon and the new Honor Harrington book isn't available until Mar 2013.

Posted by: sawhorse at November 04, 2012 11:34 AM (MVgm3)

92
BlackOrchid-StillMissingDagny at November 04, 2012 11:27 AM (J6kXj)

Peter Straub writesgreathorror.

Posted by: joanne counting down the minutes at November 04, 2012 11:34 AM (VNFBf)

93 Check out librivox.org for free audio book versions of Conan Doyle, Poe, anything public domain. There's a $2 iPhone app and all the books are free. My 2 year old has been listening to mother goose and Peter Pan.

Posted by: VBJonny at November 04, 2012 11:35 AM (bED4B)

94 The Redemption of Althalus is pretty good, too.

Okay. I'll give it a whirl.

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 11:35 AM (TOBhV)

95 Four more years of TFG freaks me out.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, with laptop dead at November 04, 2012 11:36 AM (lOmbq)

96 LP. Will do. I usually wait until books are out awhile and wait for the price to drop, but DeMille's a must buy for me. As soon as Romney has this election sown up on Tuesday night, I'll get to it.

Posted by: Liberty Lover at November 04, 2012 11:37 AM (b4W5O)

97 LP,

I just hated how the terrorist was systematically killing everyone of his targets with aplomb, military veterans and Corey only managed to stop him from killing Reagan, and then he gets away. Most of the novel revolved around a fuckhole terrorist having a grand old time killing everyone. Really pissed me off.

I only enjoyed the portions where it shifts back to Corey's first person view as they were what reminded me of why I liked Plum Island so much.

Posted by: Christina Hendricks's Mighty Jugs Teams Up With Mitt Romney's Hair to Defeat SCOAMF at November 04, 2012 11:37 AM (+AV7H)

98 Lovecraft's story "The Thing on the Stoop", I think it's called, creeps me the hell out. I've seen those post-mortem pictures and those simultaneously fascinate and terrify me.

Posted by: CMS2004 at November 04, 2012 11:37 AM (arttL)

99 If you want to talk about horror stories I hear that Helen Thomas once read 50 Shaded of Grey.

Posted by: Mr Pink at November 04, 2012 11:37 AM (Zz93p)

100 M-O-O-N, that spells Obama sucks.

Posted by: Tom Cullen at November 04, 2012 11:38 AM (BuSM8)

101 I'm a Christian and occult stuff is strictly forbidden, but when it comes to ghosts...

Best seance scene in the Christian canon: when Saul pulls up the prophet Samuel's ghost.

Very roughly paraphrasing, Samuel tells the loser king "fuck off and leave me alone", then goes back to the otherworld.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 11:39 AM (nt30N)

102 Oh and I love the Victorian post-mortem stuff. Thor asked me not to buy any though. Fuckin' pussy!

To make up for his cruelty, he started getting me those Edward Allan Haunted Memories pictures.

Last year he had one of a guy with an axe in his head sticking right out of the top of my Christmas stocking, it was classic.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 11:39 AM (2rMmy)

103 "The Haunting of Hill House" is genuinely spooky, but the one that creeped me out the most was "We Have Always Lived In The Castle". She's got that thing down perfect, of leaving the reader unsure how much is real and how much is the character sinking into insanity.

Hmm, I'll have to check out "Castle." I don't have a distinct memory of "Haunting," perhaps because the eponymous movie from the sixties was so good. A real example of "showing less and suggesting more."

Posted by: David Allen Poe at November 04, 2012 11:40 AM (AZGON)

104 A friend of a friend of mine has released a book on Kindle. Time travel and serial killers and religious cults. Free for you Prime people.

Time's Twisted Arrow

Posted by: JSchuler at November 04, 2012 11:40 AM (SmZQt)

105 And of course the link doesn't work. Damn I suck with this html thing.

http://tinyurl.com/batnstb

Posted by: JSchuler at November 04, 2012 11:41 AM (SmZQt)

106 David Allen Poe indeed.

Posted by: George Orwell what forgets his socks. at November 04, 2012 11:42 AM (AZGON)

107 "The Haunting of Hill House" is genuinely spooky, but the one that creeped me out the most was "We Have Always Lived In The Castle". She's got that thing down perfect, of leaving the reader unsure how much is real and how much is the character sinking into insanity.

I should have mentioned Shirley Jackson's horror writings.

As if her classic short story 'The Lottery' wasn't creepy enough.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 04, 2012 11:43 AM (2b/zn)

108 The scariest book I ever read was the original Bram
Stoker Dracula. I was in the 7th grade so that may have had some impact.
I also could not put it down.


So if you want a real scary book read that one.


Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 11:14 AM (YdQQY)


I assume you were reading it on your own. A high school English class had us read it because it was a good example of a work being narrated by letters (there's a name for that which eludes me right now and I'm too fucking lazy to look it up). I thought it was an inspired choice as far as finding a work that didn't bore the shit out of young male minds more interested in tits and puss. And yes it was one scary book.

Just made it through the first part of Middlemarch and am thoroughly enjoying it. It is written extremely densely so making large amounts of headway is somewhat difficult; plus I'm a slow reader by design. I always knew I'd enjoy this but other books kept getting in the way.

Posted by: Captain Hate (more dagny and less curious) at November 04, 2012 11:43 AM (Kp9Rs)

109 Do you like ghost stories?

Ghost stories in an M.R. James vein?

You know....

The kind that build to give you a pure moment of goose-bumpy, spine-tingling horror.

Then read:

"Antique Dust" by Robert Westall

It is hands down the best traditional style ghost story book written by a modern author.

The bridge between the stories is a dealer in antiques.

Unfortunately, it is out-of-print. But, you can buy it for cheap USED from Amazon or ABE.

"Antique Dust" is perfect for that cold winter night where you're bundled up by the fire sipping from a glass of cognac.

or

for that cold winter's night where you're knocking back a PBR after fapping to Soledad O'Brien and you just want the shame to go away cuz you're starting to think that maybe, in the right light, Helen Thomas is pretty damn fappable her own self.

Either way, your call but "Antique Dust" is damn good.

Posted by: naturalfake at November 04, 2012 11:43 AM (G9qZk)

110 87 61 also, I read the Belgariad this week.
Pretty good little Fantasy Series by D. Eddings.
Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 11:22 AM (pjsQY)

Oh my heart. I read that series so many times. It's delightful fun. Don't read anything else by eddings, there's no point.


This. Eddings takes the same frickin' storyline and regurgitates it endlessly. He even admits as much in The Malloreon. One of the lead characters as much as says that they're following precisely the same path as their previous adventure. And the ending was a total and complete cop-out. When he "resolved" the conflict I literally shouted "are you fucking kidding me??" I was pissed.

Meh. Basically a one-hit-wonder.

Posted by: NukemHill at November 04, 2012 11:43 AM (7WLzC)

111 Oh, and could someone please explain the "forced orgasm" thingy to me? I find myself, um, intrigued...

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, with laptop dead at November 04, 2012 11:43 AM (lOmbq)

112 http://www.hplovecraft.com/writings/texts/

You're welcome.

Posted by: George Orwell what knows four more years will mean INGSOC wins at November 04, 2012 11:43 AM (AZGON)

113 Nelson DeMille's new book, "The Panther," is excellent, and has a Benghazi pre-9/11 feel to parts of it.

He really captures well the inter-agency jousting that takes place in an embassy setting in a middle-east location, with al-Qaida rampant out in the boonies.

There is State Dept security, there is CIA, FBI, lawyers for Justice, lawyers for State, ex-Seal contractors, and more, and there is not one single Muslim to trust, on the whole fucking planet. Agendas, egos, honor, reputations, all on steroids.

And everyone is carrying. Glocks, HKs, ARs, AK47s, machine guns, grenades, everything.

Guy says to his Muslim chauffer, Mohammed, "We get attacked, my first bullet is through your head. Got that?"

Mo says, "Yes, sir."

Posted by: The littl shyning man at November 04, 2012 11:43 AM (PH+2B)

114 99 If you want to talk about horror stories I hear that Helen Thomas once read 50 Shaded of Grey.


I once listened to an audiobook of Anaïs Nin stories read by Andrea Mitchell. I couldn't sleep for a week.

Posted by: George Orwell what knows four more years will mean INGSOC wins at November 04, 2012 11:45 AM (AZGON)

115
What I find really creepy are horror stories that involve children as the main characters, probably something to do with children being perceived in our minds as helpless and innocent--so when they are turned into monsters there's that extra horror factor.

A fantastic short story collection in the sci-fi/horror genre is called "Tomorrow's Children" edited by Asimov. One of the stories in it--It's a Good Life--was made into a Twilight Zone episode. The book is out of print but you can find used copies for sale on the net. Another story in that collection is called Star Bright about a little girl who's a super-genius and ends up disappearing when she plays mind games with a moebius strip.

Posted by: the clubfooted pegleg at November 04, 2012 11:45 AM (Q2wni)

116 So i go to the campaign headquarters in Delco PA for my Orca gear.
NO APP
just a booket to be filled out. Is this a local Fail, or is Pixie also supporting the Orca app?

Posted by: Buzzsaw90 at November 04, 2012 11:46 AM (kzejo)

117 The thought of 4 more years of TFG gives me the heebie jeebies AND the willies

Posted by: Jones in CO at November 04, 2012 11:46 AM (8sCoq)

118 The best modern writer for plotting was Robert McCammon, who I think King copied a bit. The best King book is likely IT. King's books have become way too long and plotless. The films made from the last two decades of his books reveal the actual shallowness of the plotting.

Posted by: pat at November 04, 2012 11:47 AM (vY2MW)

119 also, what is this Cthulhu whatsit you people are always referencing? Is it some kind of beetle?

Posted by: Jones in CO at November 04, 2012 11:48 AM (8sCoq)

120 Thanks shyning man. I'm looking forward to it.

Posted by: Liberty Lover at November 04, 2012 11:48 AM (b4W5O)

121 I loved the original 'The Haunting' when I saw it as a kid, but when I rewatched it a few years ago, I'm afraid it didn't do much for me anymore. I could appreciate the black and white photography and the spooky POV camera angles, but somehow it didn't seem that scary. I still think the book is scary, though, and the ending is more powerful. The movie softened it a bit, taking some of the responsibility away from Elinor; the wheel started jerking as if it were possessed, and then there was the appearance of the doctor's wife in front of her, causing her to lose control and run into the tree. But in the book, there's none of that, just Elinor admiring her own cleverness as she picks up speed and deliberately crashes the car - with a last mental cry for help from the remaining lucid part of her mind in the split second before her death. Very horrifying.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 04, 2012 11:49 AM (FkH4y)

122
For real life horror check out: Another Nightmare Gig From Hell at amazon.

True musicians' tales of wonder and woe from the road. I have two stories in thebook. Big Head Todd is in there too. Funny and scary stuff. Almost beaten to a pulpby union thugswhile touringAlaska, etc.

Posted by: Meremortal at November 04, 2012 11:49 AM (1Y+hH)

123 Okay, y'all have me excited about Shirley Jackson again.

Posted by: George Orwell what knows four more years will mean INGSOC wins at November 04, 2012 11:49 AM (AZGON)

124 Once you have had an actual ghost in your house, stories about ghosts seem lame.

Posted by: Truman North, 315-217 at November 04, 2012 11:49 AM (tcviL)

125 there's a new demille book? omg....must get it asap......love his stuff.....dear lord how i love his stuff

Posted by: phoenixgirl, ROMNEY/RYAN2012 at November 04, 2012 11:50 AM (Ho2rs)

126 Mitt Romney's only drawing bigger crowds at rallies than President Obama because Romney's some sort of curiosity and people want to see him once before he fades from public life.

Meanwhile, they know President Obama will continue to be there for them, as their President, and that confidence makes them feel comfortable going about their lives, rather than make the time to see him.

Posted by: Stephanocchio Cutter at November 04, 2012 11:50 AM (RLZvP)

127 Re: Tom Wolfe's "Back to Blood" -- could not get into it. Gave up after 100 pages and I was previously a Wolfe fan. Almost read like a parody of a Wolfe novel and/or a joke on the readers. No characters that seemed worth following, just Wolfe's writerly mannerisms on steroids.

Re: Ken Follett's "Fall of Giants" (book one of the Century Trilogy) -- loved it despite the length. (985 pages). Look forward to completing the trilogy, after a break... ;-)

Posted by: Doug at November 04, 2012 11:50 AM (Xsx32)

128 Jones, see the creature above.


Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 11:51 AM (2rMmy)

129 >Meanwhile, they know President Obama will continue
to be there for them, as their President, and that confidence makes them
feel comfortable going about their lives, rather than make the time to
see him.


Posted by: Stephanocchio Cutter at November 04, 2012 11:50 AM (RLZvP)

you left out how Obama's balls taste.

Posted by: Jones in CO at November 04, 2012 11:51 AM (8sCoq)

130 @126 EEK! Make it stop!!

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, with laptop dead at November 04, 2012 11:51 AM (lOmbq)

131 ELBOWS ELBOWS ELBOWS.


Someone wake Dave up.

Posted by: Billy Bob, pseudo intellectual at November 04, 2012 11:52 AM (wR+pz)

132 Hey zim!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 11:53 AM (2rMmy)

133 Is Dave here, man?

Posted by: zimriel puts the bong down at November 04, 2012 11:53 AM (nt30N)

134 >>>what is this Cthulhu whatsit you people are always referencing?


It's the Shaggoth you have to worry about...damned tomato stealing bastard.

Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 11:53 AM (pjsQY)

135 Judges in Florida screwing around with the elections again. Trying to help the Dems. See drudge.

Posted by: pat at November 04, 2012 11:54 AM (vY2MW)

136 you left out how Obama's balls taste.
Posted by: Jones in CO at November 04, 2012 11:51 AM (8sCoq)


Please don't put ideas into her head.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 11:54 AM (2rMmy)

137 Truman I live in a 260 year old house. Ghost stories have been told about my house and town and someone even wrote a book about it. I've lived here 27 years and find the whole thing laughable. For sure I never have believed in ghosts but I know where to look based on those stories. I guess I don't have much of imagination. You know who scares me? Statists, that's who.

Posted by: Liberty Lover at November 04, 2012 11:54 AM (b4W5O)

138 hai Tammy.

One more hour before the Texans game. I hear that some upstate New Yorkers might show up too, if they're brave enough.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 11:54 AM (nt30N)

139 The worst horror story I've ever read was Jon Meacham's "American Lion"--a horrible supposed biography of Andrew Jackson.

Posted by: Libra at November 04, 2012 11:54 AM (kd8U8)

140 "Seriously, I firmly believe and understand more clearly as time goes on, is that Jesus Christ has routed Satan, once and for all."
Amen.
I just finished reading Wuthering Heights. I had to fight my way through it as the characters were not likable. It was considered quite dark and controversial for its time. Next up is The Casual Vacancy by JK Rowling.

I'm enjoying not thinking about the election!

Posted by: Mrs. Dang at November 04, 2012 11:55 AM (R18D0)

141 You know who scares me? Statists, that's who.

Boo!

Posted by: Friedrich Engels at November 04, 2012 11:55 AM (kWG8Z)

142 Of course, taste is subjective. The sixties movie of "The Haunting" works for me precisely because of the acting and the paralysis of fear Julie Harris shows. The lack of gore and jack-in-the-box surprise shots makes it more real to me. Plus the superb score by Humphrey Searle. The one bedroom scene when something pounds on the door is awesome, as is the creaking door in the library.

Posted by: George Orwell what knows four more years will mean INGSOC wins at November 04, 2012 11:55 AM (AZGON)

143 @124

Once you have had an actual ghost in your house, stories about ghosts seem lame.

Posted by: Truman North, 315-217 at November 04, 2012 11:49 AM (tcviL)


Once you've seen Truman North fap to his hand-drawn erotica of Hello Kitty and Mr Peanut having sex for the one hundred and twenty sixth time-

well....

you just kind lose the will to haunt...

Posted by: The Ghost in Truman North's House at November 04, 2012 11:56 AM (G9qZk)

144 Reading Jo Nesbo's "The Redbeast" now. I am a fan of the Harry Hole books. Thought that "The Leopard" was quite good and "The Snowman" was excellent. So far, "The Redbeast" is very good.

Posted by: Doug at November 04, 2012 11:56 AM (Xsx32)

145 The Stand Lincoln Tunnel scene is the apex of King's work. So glad you mentioned that. It is the creepiest, sickest, hairiest, most skin crawling scene in any book I have read. I remember vividly the first time I read that section of the book. I put the book down, grabbed a beer and chugged it. Wicked awesome awful...

Posted by: BetaPhi at November 04, 2012 11:56 AM (bGg6O)

146
"Stephanocchio Cutter"

Nah, it's just Messina dressed up in drag. He and the president have a lot of bro-love. Bromance. Meanwhile the real Steph Cutter and Axelrod have a shitty romance on the horizon I predict.

Posted by: Mo the Girl at November 04, 2012 11:58 AM (B+XCM)

147 My prediction _( ya It's total crap)_

*If* the Steelers beat the Giants--

Romney takes PA.

If the Giants win--

it's O for O.

Obama wins Ohio.

(I'm just sayin')

Posted by: tasker at November 04, 2012 11:58 AM (r2PLg)

148 That's my horror haiku .

Posted by: tasker at November 04, 2012 11:59 AM (r2PLg)

149 I hate Messina's face. He and Axelrod both look like people whom To Catch A Predator almost caught.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 11:59 AM (nt30N)

150 I actually finished the longer version of The Stand, and I liked it more than the original version. The original I thought was too long by at least a third, the longer one, ironically, seems to have just the right amount of detail to keep things moving.

My big complaint about The Stand is that the heroes, Stu Redman and Frannie Goldsmith, are awful. Thick with treacle and just damned unlikable. Harold Lauder is the most interesting character and should have been the book's hero.

Posted by: BeckoningChasm at November 04, 2012 11:59 AM (i0App)

151 Posted by: Mrs. Dang at November 04, 2012 11:55 AM (R18D0)


Oh, do please give us your opinion on the Rowling novel when you've finished! I am on the fence about buying it. Not sure why.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 12:00 PM (2rMmy)

152 (applies Sock-B-Gon)

Posted by: Prothonotary Warbler (@ProthonotaryW) at November 04, 2012 12:00 PM (RLZvP)

153 Somebody turn on the Elbow Signal Light.

Posted by: BackwardsBoy, with laptop dead at November 04, 2012 12:01 PM (lOmbq)

154 76
I don't read books, but did Brit Hume just predict an Obama victory?


Why are you surprised, it is NBC policy.

Posted by: Billy Bob, pseudo intellectual at November 04, 2012 12:02 PM (wR+pz)

155 Hey Warbler!!!! How have you been?

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 12:03 PM (2rMmy)

156 what did Brit Hume say? oh sh*t

Posted by: kelley in virginia at November 04, 2012 12:03 PM (HNwOT)

157 Doing well! How about you, Tammy?

Posted by: Prothonotary Warbler (@ProthonotaryW) at November 04, 2012 12:04 PM (RLZvP)

158 c'mon. who can read pleasure books at a time like this?

Posted by: kelley in virginia at November 04, 2012 12:04 PM (HNwOT)

159 Anyone have any good zombie book recommendations. I liked world war z, but thought the walking dead was a little tiresome.

Posted by: Nc at November 04, 2012 12:04 PM (LmX/s)

160 I am halfway through "The Twilight War" by James Dickard. He is a military historian detailing the US/Iran covert war from 1978 to present. Good book so far.

Posted by: Mr. Dave at November 04, 2012 12:04 PM (OBDWE)

161 Here's a theme song

http://tinyurl.com/b7hgqma

BOC

Posted by: DaveA at November 04, 2012 12:04 PM (MOWP1)

162 I hate Messina's face. He and Axelrod both look like people whom To Catch A Predator almost caught.

Messina was a central character in Lovecraft's "The Terrible Old Man-Child."

Posted by: George Orwell what knows four more years will mean INGSOC wins at November 04, 2012 12:05 PM (AZGON)

163 dave in fla: i'm getting all eeyorish again. help me.

Posted by: kelley in virginia at November 04, 2012 12:05 PM (HNwOT)

164 Not too shabby, thanks. Settling in, trying not to miss my man, as well as fight this sinking feeling I have about the election.

Come to think of it, pretty shabby after all!

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 12:06 PM (2rMmy)

165
naturalfake: ""Antique Dust" by Robert Westall. It is hands down the best traditional style ghost story book written by a modern author."

You've sold me - it's not available in my public library, so I've just ordered it from Abebooks.com. Anything in the vein of M.R. James is good enough for me.

Posted by: Dr. Mabuse at November 04, 2012 12:06 PM (FkH4y)

166 The Stand Lincoln Tunnel scene is the apex of King's work. So glad you mentioned that

Thanks for the correction (Lincoln, not Holland, Tunnel). What a scene.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 04, 2012 12:06 PM (2b/zn)

167 Nelson DeMille's John Corey is my favorite character of any series of books I've read including Mitch Rapp and Jack Ryan...A guys guy and most men i know think like DeMille writes him to think. Loved the Lions Game but meh on The Lion, gotta get The Panther but I'm backed up on reading with 2 Clancy books looking at me and wondering why I've abandoned them...

Posted by: Tony253 at November 04, 2012 12:06 PM (3yMFT)

168 I read Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman last week. I really enjoyed it! It's sort of a sequel to American Gods, but I think it stands just fine on its own. It's much funnier than the more serious American Gods.

Posted by: Prothonotary Warbler (@ProthonotaryW) at November 04, 2012 12:08 PM (RLZvP)

169
Why does everyone keep saying don't believe the polls, yet everyone seems to believe the polls coming out of a state (OHIO) which in 2010 elected more Republicans in their state, have a GOP governor, a new GOP senator, and 13 out of 18 congressional group in D.C. ?

Posted by: Mo the Girl at November 04, 2012 12:08 PM (B+XCM)

170 Horror story:
going to your backyard and seeing 10 million leaves that have to be raked

Posted by: chemjeff at November 04, 2012 12:09 PM (d/5qf)

171 162
I hate Messina's face




It is a face that could easily get punched in a bar for no reason except that he is a pussy.

Assuming it was a straight bar, if not he'd get kissed.

Posted by: Billy Bob, pseudo intellectual at November 04, 2012 12:09 PM (wR+pz)

172 170
Horror story:
going to your backyard and seeing 10 million leaves that have to be raked


Hey, STFU. They are in my fucking pool. Try raking those bastards.

Posted by: Billy Bob, the 1% at November 04, 2012 12:10 PM (wR+pz)

173 Typingy of horror a0ny recommendations on how to clean leftover mouse tartar off the concrete breezeway before my neighbor steps in it?

Posted by: DaveA at November 04, 2012 12:11 PM (MOWP1)

174 chemjeff...mulching mower = no rake.

Posted by: Oklahoman at November 04, 2012 12:11 PM (U6V2s)

175 It'll get better, Tammy! Thor will return, and I think the crowds at recent rallies are a very strong sign for the election.

Posted by: Prothonotary Warbler (@ProthonotaryW) at November 04, 2012 12:12 PM (RLZvP)

176 Wow - I'm just re-reading The Mountains of Madness by Mr. Lovecraft - dude is the bomb.

One of his protegees, Robert Bloch, is excellent with Psycho. Even if you've seen the original movie, Mr. Bloch's novel (that it's based on) is great.

OB, please add my condolences to your loss. I hope your parents are in a better place. ^_^

Thanks for the para on our Savior. Jesus is the best! *_*

mac :]

Posted by: macbrooks at November 04, 2012 12:12 PM (Kcjfs)

177 off to rake the leaves...

Posted by: chemjeff at November 04, 2012 12:12 PM (d/5qf)

178 I doubt Messina could even get any kissyface in a gay bar, unless it had those convenient gaps in the bathroom stalls. I just have this picture of some dude in leather looking at that smug face and thinking... oh, hell, no, people are watching.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 12:13 PM (nt30N)

179
""Clowns scare the crap out of me""


What about Biden? He's a clown, and he just seems stupid.

Posted by: Berserker at November 04, 2012 12:13 PM (FMbng)

180 Thank you kindly 46, Truman.

Posted by: Dix Handley at November 04, 2012 12:14 PM (gKuGC)

181 >>Typingy of horror a0ny recommendations on how to clean leftover mouse tartar off the concrete breezeway before my neighbor steps in it?

Shot Glass of Toothpicks and a 'Free Samples' sign.

Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 12:15 PM (UPMaB)

182 #178: I suspect that's part of the reason the "gimp suit" was invented.

Posted by: Prothonotary Warbler (@ProthonotaryW) at November 04, 2012 12:15 PM (RLZvP)

183 Anyone have any good zombie book recommendations. I liked world war z, but thought the walking dead was a little tiresome.

Did you actually read the zombie book recommendations I included in this blog post?

No? Well, then, in the barrel you go.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 04, 2012 12:15 PM (2b/zn)

184 >Hey, STFU. They are in my fucking pool. Try raking those bastards.


Posted by: Billy Bob, the 1% at November 04, 2012 12:10 PM (wR+pz)

hey, STFU. You have A POOL.

Posted by: Jones in CO at November 04, 2012 12:16 PM (8sCoq)

185 Wherever they've got Biden locked up, I hope they're at least feeding him. Maybe they've got the Cartoon Network on, that'll keep him occupied.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 12:16 PM (nt30N)

186 Did you actually read the ...blog post?No? Well, then, in the barrel you go.


Nobody reads the fuckin' posts.
Sometimes I'll skim a headline, but read a post? a whole post?
You have to be kidding, me. This is not a 'barreling' offense.

Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 12:18 PM (UPMaB)

187 Horror.

The Tell-Tale Heart.


Ba-Boomp, Ba-Boomp, Ba-Boomp.

Posted by: Meremortal at November 04, 2012 11:22 AM



When I was in 9th grade, our history teacher played a recording of Richard Burton reading this story. That was over 40 years ago. It still scares me. Another genuinely scary book is "Julian's House", which came out 20+ years ago about newlywed parapsychologists who move into a haunted house. "Ghost Story", by Peter Straub, should be a classic of the genre. Pretty much anything by Rober McCammon in his early horror writing days and now, in his not horror writing days, but particularly a book called "Mine" about a woman following the batshit crazy self-proclaimed revolutionary who kidnapped her baby.

Posted by: huerfano at November 04, 2012 12:18 PM (bAGA/)

188 Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 12:00 PM (2rMmy)
"Oh, do please give us your opinion on the Rowling novel when you've finished! I am on the fence about buying it. Not sure why."

Will do! It's getting mixed reviews, but the story sounds good to me.

Posted by: Mrs. Dang at November 04, 2012 12:20 PM (R18D0)

189 Oregonmuse -- I was not trying to be rude, but I was soliciting more. Not a big fan of the walking dead.

Posted by: Nc at November 04, 2012 12:20 PM (LmX/s)

190 horror story? go to carve the pumpkins on Halloween with my daughter.....look over....10 ft away under the base of our basketball hoop.....the rattlesnake that entered our garage back in july...i tore the garage apart in 118 degrees for three days and couldn't find that thing and then after 4 mos later after checking my surroundings every time i got in or out of the car and a foot bigger he's right there......anyway i'm not sure what happened but his head somehow got separated from his body....it's all a blur....

Posted by: phoenixgirl, ROMNEY/RYAN2012 at November 04, 2012 12:21 PM (Ho2rs)

191 if yall don't think a Bambi win on Tuesday aint horrifying enough, then you don't know real horror

Posted by: kelley in virginia at November 04, 2012 12:21 PM (HNwOT)

192 The littl shyning man - thanks! Looking forward to picking up The Panther.

Glad to see other DeMille fans on here - he's my favorite author. I love me some John Grisham (recent law school grad, duh), but DeMille is a better writer, and far wittier to boot.

I'm also a fan of Vince Flynn and agree with John Corey being better than Mitch Rapp, though Rapp is still a badass.

I've never gotten into Clancy novels. I've tried with several of them. For some reason he can't hold me. I haven't tried reading him in years though, maybe I should pick one of his books up again. Any suggestions for one that would hook me?

Posted by: LP at November 04, 2012 12:21 PM (pR8WM)

193 Oh my heart. I read that series so many times. It's delightful fun. Don't read anything else by eddings, there's no point.

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 11:31 AM (TOBhV)

Git that right, every plot is the same.

Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 12:21 PM (YdQQY)

194 Elbows.
or Cakegurl. Either way.

Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 12:21 PM (UPMaB)

195 good for you phoenix girl. at least you can dispense with that nagging worry

Posted by: kelley in virginia at November 04, 2012 12:22 PM (HNwOT)

196 LOLWarren: she's still claiming she's got plenty of pictures showing her Indian heritage, "but they're not for you".

Keep fuckin' that chicken, Lizzie.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 12:22 PM (nt30N)

197 Tell Dave we have lite the beacons. ELBOWS! Hurry! Frodo need the Elbows.


http://tinyurl.com/d4aabj

Posted by: Billy Bob, pseudo intellectual at November 04, 2012 12:23 PM (wR+pz)

198 Nobody reads the fuckin' posts.
Sometimes I'll skim a headline, but read a post? a whole post?
You have to be kidding, me. This is not a 'barreling' offense.Posted by: garrett at November 04, 2012 12:18 PM (UPMaB)----------------- Two go in , one comes out

Posted by: Velvet Ambition at November 04, 2012 12:23 PM (R8hU8)

199 kelley

now if that nagging worry tuesday goes away...i'll be golden!!!!

Posted by: phoenixgirl, ROMNEY/RYAN2012 at November 04, 2012 12:24 PM (Ho2rs)

200 Monster Hunter International by Larry Correia is a highly enjoyable book. Not exactly a zombie book, but it does have zombies in it. It also has vampires and werewolves and elves (you gotta see these elves, by the way; they're awesome!) and orcs and all sorts of other things. It's a lot of fun! And the writer is a conservative.

Posted by: Prothonotary Warbler (@ProthonotaryW) at November 04, 2012 12:25 PM (RLZvP)

201 Anyone ever seen My Fellow Americans? Biden reminds me of John Heard's VP character. He was supposedly inspired by Dan Quayle, but he seems more like Biden to me. I so don't want a VP like this for another four years. Joe needs a good vacation and possibly some counseling.

Posted by: Mo the Girl at November 04, 2012 12:25 PM (B+XCM)

202 Posted by: Berserker at November 04, 2012 12:13 PM (FMbng)

With Uncle Joe, the comedy overrides the horror. He is such a buffoon!



Mrs Danf, I reread the description of the Rowling book, and remembered why I am on the fence. It sounds bleak to me. I think I am only wanting to but it for sentimental reasons, which is why I am hesitating. Pedophilia and self mutilating as part of a plot don't entice me much. I don't like sad.

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 12:26 PM (2rMmy)

203 No need to buy H. P. Lovecraft. You can download a free ebook of the complete works here:

http://cthulhuchick.com/free-complete-lovecraft-ebook-nook-kindle/

Posted by: sandy burger at November 04, 2012 12:26 PM (LvH99)

204 Yeesh, phoenix, that is creepy.

I ran over a mouse in my garage last month. Just noticed all of a sudden there was blood low on my wall. Yikes, how did it get there, should I call the cops... then I saw that freshly flattened rodent. Yecch.

We have some very unintelligent mice out here. Mrs Frisby they are not.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 12:27 PM (nt30N)

205 LP. Do you like Baldacci? His best will always be Absolute Power. Grisham, has lost me with his later stuff.

Posted by: Liberty Lover at November 04, 2012 12:27 PM (b4W5O)

206 A scary book: "Uncle Silas" by J. Sheridan LeFanu. In the public domain because written in the 1800s.

Posted by: microcosme at November 04, 2012 12:27 PM (MLK6H)

207 I just want some Clark Ashton Smith shortstories. Unfortunately thanks to DISNEY, speaking of dead mice, Smith's works are after the deadline, excepting that poetry book.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 12:28 PM (nt30N)

208 zim

one of the kids dropped a yogurt in the garage while unloading groceries......i backed over it yesterday and there was yogurt everywhere....the cleanup was nasty...can't imagine mouse blood....yuck....

Posted by: phoenixgirl, ROMNEY/RYAN2012 at November 04, 2012 12:29 PM (Ho2rs)

209 "The Father-thing" by Philip K. Dick, 1954 short story, available online:

http://www.american-buddha.com/dick.phildickreader.7.htm

Posted by: Piercello at November 04, 2012 12:29 PM (E/6f0)

210 a story that doesn't really go anywhere or do much of anything, but in
only 2 pages, Lovecraft manages to create a totally disturbing
atmosphere of chaos, despair, and madness.

Have we met?

Posted by: the new york times' editorial pages at November 04, 2012 12:29 PM (nkiQM)

211 Oregonmuse -- I was not trying to be rude, but I was soliciting more. Not a big fan of the walking dead.

Didn't mean to sound petulant, but there were a couple of other mentions of zombie books later on in the post, in the 'Recommendations from Morons' section.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 04, 2012 12:30 PM (2b/zn)

212 Prothonotary Warbler
The Monster hunter books are great.

Posted by: pat at November 04, 2012 12:30 PM (vY2MW)

213 Scariest book?

Mitt Romney's Binder of Bound Womens!!!

Posted by: the new york times' editorial pages at November 04, 2012 12:30 PM (nkiQM)

214 Rattlers are like common Garter snakes -- they're homebodies, stay local, and don't go on extended walkabouts like Coral snakes.

If it was a female, you may get an eruption of baby rattlers coming from wherever it was hiding.

Posted by: @PurpAv at November 04, 2012 12:31 PM (GOVTb)

215 George Will predicts Romney 321-217 victory. http://tinyurl.com/azqalss Snippet: On this weekend’s broadcast of “This Week with George Stephanopoulos”
on ABC, Will revealed his prediction and added a bonus surprise by
saying traditional Democratic state Minnesota would go for Romney as
well.
“I’m projecting Minnesota to go for Romney,” Will said. “It’s the
only state that’s voted democratic in nine consecutive elections, but
this year, there’s marriage amendment on the ballot that will bring out
the evangelicals and I think could make the difference.”

Posted by: Sherry McEvil, Wily Wrepublican Wench at November 04, 2012 12:31 PM (kXoT0)

216 on Wednesday, one of things I will want to explore is "why did Obama keep Biden on the ticket?" seems stupid

Posted by: kelley in virginia at November 04, 2012 12:31 PM (HNwOT)

217 Tuesday, we will ride right through them!

Are you ready!


http://tinyurl.com/cumzcxc

Posted by: Billy Bob, pseudo intellectual at November 04, 2012 12:31 PM (wR+pz)

218
Vic, I looked on Amazon and the new Honor Harrington book isn't available until Mar 2013.


Posted by: sawhorse at November 04, 2012 11:34 AM (MVgm3)

But it is available in an E-arc version at the Baen site

Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 12:32 PM (YdQQY)

219 somebody here turned me on to The Remaining for good zombie fiction on Kindle.

Posted by: USS Diversity at November 04, 2012 12:33 PM (9ghZ6)

220 Liked the added content in The Stand -- didn't like the attempt to update all the details to the 1990's. I don't know why.

Posted by: The Chap, etc. at November 04, 2012 12:33 PM (fscec)

221 The Horror!
So, what creeps you out?


Democrats.

Posted by: rickb223 at November 04, 2012 12:35 PM (d0Dmj)

222 George Will changes mind. Now says Romney by landslide.

Posted by: pat at November 04, 2012 12:35 PM (vY2MW)

223 Thanks for posting Byron's Audacity of Hope (above), aka 'Darkness'.

Posted by: panzernashorn at November 04, 2012 12:37 PM (BAnPT)

224 Well, if Romney loses, the Republicans won't have anyone internal to blame. The GOP campaign has been almost perfect. I haven't seen anything like it from the GOP (1984 was the first campaign I remember).

If Obama loses there's a shitload of people for the Democrats to blame, but mostly Obama.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 12:37 PM (nt30N)

225 #216: I think the plan was to drop Biden in favor of Anthony Weiner. Weiner was a rising star of the Left, and would've greatly improved liberal voter enthusiasm as the VP candidate. He was kind of like their equivalent of Paul Ryan. Then, well... you know what happened.

Posted by: Prothonotary Warbler (@ProthonotaryW) at November 04, 2012 12:38 PM (RLZvP)

226 Git that right, every plot is the same.
Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 12:21 PM (YdQQY)

Back up from Vic. Thx. Dracula was my first favorite book. I'm still angry at Coppola for that abomination of a movie he made with the same name.

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 12:38 PM (TOBhV)

227 Liberty Lover - I DO like Baldacci! Don't know why I forgot him in my list.

I haven't kept up with his latest books though, nor have I read nearly as many of his books as I have Grisham and DeMille. My dad has Zero Day, which I need to borrow and read.

I've read Hour Game, Split Second, Saving Faith, and The Winner. The Winner was a fun one to read, pretty unique story.

I've started/stopped reading several of his Oliver Stone/John Carr/Camel Club books. I think I've finished one of them, not sure which. I've never really been able to fully buy into that series, seems too much like Dan Brown (DaVinci Code - a book that I loved, btw).

I've heard Absolute Power is a great Baldacci book. I need to pick it up.

One newer author I've been introduced to lately is Brad Meltzer. I read The First Counsel at the beach this past summer: http://www.amazon.com/First-Counsel-Brad-Meltzer/dp/0446572187

Posted by: LP at November 04, 2012 12:39 PM (pR8WM)

228 Well folks temps approaching 68 outside now. Time for the porch rocker since it is supposed to make it to 79 today.

Posted by: Vic at November 04, 2012 12:40 PM (YdQQY)

229 Have fun, Vic!

Posted by: Prothonotary Warbler (@ProthonotaryW) at November 04, 2012 12:43 PM (RLZvP)

230 Looking for a series of books covering what I'd call "The Rise of Western Civilization". Like a set of four textbooks, 'Ancient Civilizations (Babylon, Greece, etc.)' 'Rise fall of Rome', 'Holy Roman Empire - Britain', 'American History'. Yes, I can find the typical liberal books, but I'd like to hear what The Horde has to say. Looking for books that empathize the Why. As in "Why is the Law of Hammurabi important?"

Posted by: Al at November 04, 2012 12:44 PM (MzQOZ)

231 son . of . a . bitch !!!! knock three times on the ceiling if ...... W T F !!!!
ive got that stupid song stuck in my head now !!!! thanks morons

Posted by: alec at November 04, 2012 12:44 PM (usWYv)

232 So late to the party, again, but I have to recommend this horror collection: http://is.gd/vmaGIt

It might be out of print as it wasn't on amazon and it is from 1988, but it has some excellent stories in it: the vampire one is quite original, as is the werewolf one. I have it around here somewhere - definitely a keeper.

Love "The Stand," "Salem's Lot," "The Shining," but my all time favorite King novel is "It." No one can write kids like King. And speaking of Danny Glick, our office doors are all locked and when I forget to take my card with me to the restroom, I always scratch at the glass at the front door. If I had talons like a decent vampire, it would make a better sound.

Posted by: Tonestaple at November 04, 2012 12:45 PM (gvVlx)

233 Enjoy, Vic! I trust Mrs Vic is well?

Posted by: Tammy al-Thor at November 04, 2012 12:48 PM (2rMmy)

234 So football thread up. Do we all go there or do book people stay here?

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 12:50 PM (TOBhV)

235 The Law of Hammurabi is important because it reflects the Near Eastern consensus as of the Bronze Age. It was also a monument to the divine authority of the King, ruler and lawgiver.

The stele was known as important at the time, too, which is why the Elamites looted it.

It wasn't innovative - I think Shulgi had already made a similar monument - but it was a perfect exemplar of an ancient genre.

It's also important to us, in that it shows something of the Near Eastern mindset as to the relationships between justice, divinity, and rulership. At least the Hebrew Bible is full of these themes.

Islam is a little different; `Abd al-Malik made his monuments all about religion, skipping that law stuff. The Islamic god isn't bound by laws, and the Islamic caliph is bound only by God - which is to say, in practice, also an absolute despot.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 12:51 PM (nt30N)

236 Clive Barker, The Art Trilogy

Posted by: Modgi at November 04, 2012 12:56 PM (3xuDv)

237 Need to insert here that Islam still has laws, and Abd al-Malik enforced them; but the caliph didn't put the law portions of the Qur'an on his monuments. It's my personal conjecture that the caliph didn't want the people thinking too much about a law outside of the state and the mosque.

Posted by: zimriel at November 04, 2012 12:58 PM (nt30N)

238
I haven't seen Bentley Little or James Herbert listed above. If I missed it, Sorry. Herbert's Rats trilogy is horror at it's finest. Little's the Store is totally horridly horror. Dean Koontz used to do some pretty good horror, but now he is into after death stuff which is kind of Odd.

Posted by: TimothyJ at November 04, 2012 01:00 PM (J1D9e)

239 zimriel, I feel that -I- have a decent grasp on all this. But my two daughters (at top tier schools) are somehow going to manage to not have a full-year 'Rome' course at school.

(Although I would be highlighting the difference between the 'Rule of Man' and 'Rule of Law' with the caveat of 'yes, nowhere near uniform, but it's a start.')

They're getting one at home. But I would like an actual competent history book or four.


Posted by: Al at November 04, 2012 01:01 PM (MzQOZ)

240 Ghosts are assholes.

Posted by: CAC at November 04, 2012 01:04 PM (1MGSH)

241 230
Al, not quite what you're looking for, but Penguin's "The History of the World" by J. M. Roberts is excellent. There's a new edition out, I notice, but I can't speak to its merits. If you have any teen-aged monsters who like to read, they might very well enjoy it also.

http://tinyurl.com/b8ybbx3

Posted by: Enby at November 04, 2012 01:07 PM (ptlfZ)

242 The Law of Hammurabi is important because back then they used to cut your balls off for voter fraud.

Posted by: andycanuck at November 04, 2012 01:07 PM (nkiQM)

243 The Horror!


So, what creeps you out?
---
Four more years of Commander-Present.

Posted by: sTevo at November 04, 2012 01:14 PM (VMcEw)

244 Posted by: Al at November 04, 2012 01:01 PM (MzQOZ)


Check out the book the well trained mind. It's a book for homeschooling following a classical tradition and its history based. There should be recs for high school appropriate books on ancient history plus the important primary sources and how to teach them. Get the most recent Ed.

Good luck

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 01:18 PM (TOBhV)

245 Than you Enby, I've added that to the stack.

The key bit I'm trying to convey is the route the founders took in writing the Constitution. So the details need to be there (Why the pure democracy of Athens sucked when Persia decided to reenact "300". Etc.)

Posted by: Al at November 04, 2012 01:19 PM (MzQOZ)

246 Yeah, baby! Now, we're cookin'!

Posted by: cthulhu at November 04, 2012 01:33 PM (kaalw)

247 Anyone interested in Lovecraft's stories should check out the "H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast" (hppodcraft.com) -- it's a fun look at all his work by two of the guys associated with the "Call of Cthulhu" movie project.

They aren't quite moron material, I have to admit, but they're still pretty fun to listen to.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 04, 2012 01:35 PM (BHwC8)

248 Thanks Elizabethe. I'll find that one too.

Posted by: Al at November 04, 2012 01:35 PM (MzQOZ)

249 I245 Than you Enby, I've added that to the stack.

The key bit I'm trying to convey is the route the founders took in writing the Constitution. So the details need to be there (Why the pure democracy of Athens sucked when Persia decided to reenact "300". Etc.)
Posted by: Al at November 04, 2012 01:19 PM

I'll look some stuff up. Check back here later.

Posted by: Elizabethe custard/longbow at November 04, 2012 01:38 PM (TOBhV)

250 If you want a good history survey, I strongly recommend Will and Ariel Durant's _The Story of Civilization_ series, which goes from Sumeria to Napoleon. It was written in the Fifties and Sixties, so it's before the "everything bad is white men's fault" ideology took over the field.

Shouldn't be too hard to find, or too expensive, either: one of the big book clubs gave it away as a membership premium back in the seventies, so there are likely thousands of sets in flea markets, garage sales, and used book stores.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 04, 2012 01:44 PM (BHwC8)

251 For a much more compact survey of history, try the Penguin Historical Atlas series by Colin McEvedy. There's four books, all large-format paperbacks -- the atlas of Ancient History, Medieval History, Modern History and Recent History. Note that Recent History ends in 1980, which turns out to have been premature. But McEvedy has a nice writing style and manages to give you the highlights of European history for three thousand years.

Posted by: Trimegistus at November 04, 2012 01:46 PM (BHwC8)

252 Hmm.

Trimegistus, that first one is ... long.

I'm not trying to homeschool them - they're in a top tier school already. The issue is that it is in Seattle.

Just focusing on specific points-of-conflict in the "America invented everything evil" viewpoint, and reinforce key steps along the way. (One Party -> bad, pure democracy -> bad, two-track-justice -> bad, Robin Hood robbed -government-, etc.)

Posted by: Al at November 04, 2012 02:01 PM (MzQOZ)

253 Anything by M.R. James. All of his stories are available free, since they're out of copyright. Great stories to read on Halloween.

Posted by: dbstone at November 04, 2012 02:02 PM (x1MSc)

254 And the barrel. Pixy seems to have fixed the blog-breaking aspects though. Woot!

Posted by: Al at November 04, 2012 02:02 PM (MzQOZ)

255 Obama is a stuttering clusterf*ck of a miserable failure.

Posted by: steevy at November 04, 2012 02:10 PM (MvGhw)

256
211
OregonMuse

I did not take it that way - though thanks anyway. And, FWIW, I really enjoy these book threads -- thanks for doing them.

Posted by: NC at November 04, 2012 02:19 PM (LmX/s)

257 <<I don't know very much about modern horror authors. I haven't read any
other than Stephen King. King has written a ton of books, but if you
only have time to read one them, I think that one book should be The Stand.>>

Whilst I agree that The Stand is epic, and King's best entry into the Fantasy Genre; for sheer terror - probably the one book that scared the crap out of me - I have to go with King's "It".

Also, I think you should give Clive Barker a try...not really scary type horror, but definitely a master of the macabre. And very literate as well.

Posted by: Sgt. York at November 04, 2012 03:11 PM (HS+oL)

258 If you liked The Stand, you need to read Justin Cronin's The Passage and the sequel that just came out, The Twelve.

Someone on this thread described The Stand as 'apocalyptic sci fi with Biblical overtones. That perfectly describes the Cronin books.

Posted by: Average Jen at November 04, 2012 03:12 PM (bGg6O)

259 Nyarlathotep is a dick.

Posted by: Crawling Chaos at November 04, 2012 03:21 PM (WBVkh)

260 Read Lovecraft's "At the Mountains of Madness" and "The Rats in the Walls". Damn good reading.

Posted by: Moshe Ben Avram at November 04, 2012 03:42 PM (D6//X)

261 Laird Barron. Trust me.

Posted by: Noel at November 04, 2012 03:43 PM (8Mr2R)

262 So football thread up. Do we all go there or do book people stay here?

Stay here if you want to talk about books. Most morons tend to migrate to the new threads, but there is generally life in the book thread for some hours as some can't get on until late, etc.

Posted by: OregonMuse at November 04, 2012 04:20 PM (2b/zn)

263 #42
Should menopausal hotflashes and insomnia ever send you to the guest room with twin beds, do NOT read "Oh Whistle and I'll come to you."

Posted by: Sal at November 04, 2012 04:31 PM (RGzSE)

264 Edgar Allen Poe. He knew the inside of madness.
No one has been as good that I know of.
Also, the original book of Frankenstein.

Posted by: Cactiki at November 04, 2012 04:36 PM (/t977)

265 Shadow of Freedom

It's mostly a Mike Henke story. Mostly psychological and political drama. Not too much combat. But it leads to .... interesting places.

And that about all I can say without putting in a spoiler alert and breaking the blog.

Posted by: Fox2! at November 04, 2012 04:52 PM (1Qpmy)

266 Someone above mentioned Stephen King's son, Joe Hill. I read Hill's "Heart Shaped Box," and can honestly say that it was the first time in a LONG time that I was afraid to turn out the light! It has a strong, strong start, mediocre middle and fizzled out at the end.

But, for sheer "kleepin' me out," the first third is a keeper!

Posted by: RushBabe, Infidelicious at November 04, 2012 05:00 PM (tQHzJ)

267 192

I've never gotten into Clancy novels. I've tried with several of them. For some reason he can't hold me. I haven't tried reading him in years though, maybe I should pick one of his books up again. Any suggestions for one that would hook me?
Posted by: LP at November 04, 2012 12:21 PM (pR8WM)

I would suggest either "Red Storm Rising" which is stand-alone, or Hunt for Red October, which is the beginning of the Ryan saga.

Red October was actually published by the US Naval Institute, the Navy's professional association. Not noted for printing a lot of novels.

Posted by: Fox2! at November 04, 2012 05:04 PM (1Qpmy)

268 I have a collection of stories called "Great Tales of Terror and the Supernatural". My copy is dated 1944, with the most recent author being H.P. Lovecraft.

It has great stories by great writers...Poe, Saki, de Maupassant, M.R. James, etc.

One of my favorites is "The Screaming Skull", where the narrator is telling the story to someone else and getting his reaction. Quite funny.

Another is "The Horla". Very creepy. In a lot of those older stories you really aren't sure if there is an actual outside event or the protagonist is just going crazy. Makes for interesting reading.

Oh, and I once read a definition of the differencebetween 'Horror' and 'Terror'.

Horror: When the moster kills your friend.

Terror: When you realize you're next.

Posted by: HH at November 04, 2012 05:04 PM (v+ExF)

269 or monster...sheesh.

Posted by: HH at November 04, 2012 05:06 PM (v+ExF)

270 Started "The Keep" by F. Paul Wilson. I haven't read it in years, but it is one of my favorite horror stories. Nazis take over an ancientKeep in Poland and something starts killing them off.

Posted by: Darth Randall at November 04, 2012 05:23 PM (mV8sg)

271 I've always appreciated the way Steven King fleshes his spear carriers out before he flenses them. The Stand is indeed a well crafted book, although the scene where the baddies triumphantly fetch an H-bomb into Las Vegas and its radioactivity poisons them showed the usual writerly ignorance of How Things Work.

Let me put in a word for Dean Koontz, as a sort of right-wing counterpart to King: Koontz is a very good storyteller whose gruesomeness often satisfies.

Posted by: PersonFromPorlock at November 04, 2012 05:41 PM (2VCZA)

272 An audio adaptation of 'The Call of Cthulhu' by the Atlanta Radio Theater Company in a podcast (i.e., it's free) at:

http://podcast.artc.org/webpage/2009/10

Posted by: RNB at November 04, 2012 05:59 PM (WkjqG)

273 Posted by: Darth Randall at November 04, 2012 05:23 PM (mV8sg)

I too liked the book (bad movie), Problem is it's just a ripoff of the story "The Devil is Not Mocked".

Actually done as an episode of the old "Night Gallery" TV show.

Posted by: HH at November 04, 2012 05:59 PM (v+ExF)

274 HP Lovecraft?--- "Reanmimater"-- the best hands down

Posted by: tomc at November 04, 2012 06:32 PM (avEuh)

275 Seven King: The Shining, It
Peter Stab: Ghost Story
H.P. Lovecraft: The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, The Shadow Over Innsmouth (I 2nd the motion)

Posted by: Gary S at November 04, 2012 07:35 PM (0cGbJ)

276 King? Phffttt! Dean Koontz? Now there's a master. I first fell in love with his writing in 1987 when I read The Watchers, which I finished in one reading. The next time I did that, I read Intensity. Two of the best books ever.

Posted by: Former Lurker at November 04, 2012 11:47 PM (Yoym7)

277 King? Phffttt! Dean Koontz? Now there's a master. I
first fell in love with his writing in 1987 when I read The Watchers,
which I finished in one reading. The next time I did that, I read
Intensity. Two of the best books ever.

Posted by: Former Lurker at November 04, 2012 11:47 PM



Koontz and McCammon are two of my faves. I never miss anything either writes.

Posted by: huerfano at November 04, 2012 11:50 PM (bAGA/)

278 All two pages: http://www.dagonbytes.com/thelibrary/lovecraft/nyarlathotep.htm

Sooo...anybody else notice the startling similarities between Nyarlathotep and our current SCOMF? You don't have to look too deep.

Also, did I miss the link to pictures of dead children? Don't hold out.

Posted by: SplatticusFinch at November 05, 2012 01:44 AM (k1u8x)

279 Late! But if anyone is still dipping into this thread, here is my list of:

RECOMMENDED KINDLE ZOMBIE BOOKS

There is a lot of junk in the Kindle zombies section (even many of the "Best of" and "Top 10" lists are filled with (in my view) second-tier stuff).

But there are some gems, too. All of the books in this list are at least good, and some are very good. They are listed in rough order of goodness, with my top favorites first.

Flesh Eaters by Joe McKinney. A hurricane devastates Houston. From the flood waters emerge you-know-what. I re-read this as comfort food of sorts the day after the election. The action does not start on the first page, but stick with it. This is a good one, real good. Also highly recommended is Joe McKinney's Dead City, a terrific, non-stop roller coaster ride of a book (where the action does start on the first page, and basically never lets up).

Left with the Dead by Stephen Knight. A tough old soldier who is cut off from his company must survive in a zombie-infested NYC. This is a longish short story that builds to a very powerful climax. It's a sequel to The Gathering Dead, which is also recommended (LWTD, the second book in this series, can easily be read as a stand-alone).

Area 187 by Eric Lowther. Northern Virginia and environs have been quarantined to contain the zombie plague. Good yarn, good read.

Mountain Man by Keith Blackmore. A moron-type hillbilly/redneck manages to survive the zombie apocalypse while staying (for the most part) massively drunk. Good yarn, good read.

Wild Strawberry by T.A. Donnelly. Download the sample opening chapter of this book -- it's a great zombie set piece. The book features some action scenes that are absolutely *intense*.

Trailer Park Zombies by Jason H. Jones. The first chapter or two, and the ending are a bit... mmm, off-key, but this book mostly kicks ass. A fun ride, with some great zombie action.

Lou vs. the Zombies by Jason Tucker. When I came across this title while browsing Amazon, I thought the premise sounded maybe a little too cute. But it's a really fun short story that delivers the zombie goods.

Dead of Night by Jonathan Maberry. The energy seems to fade a bit in the second half of this book, but the first half (maybe the first two-thirds) rocks.

Monster Island by David Wellington. Has a couple of very cool, fresh ideas. The last part had a twist I didn't really like, but the book mostly rocks.

The Enemy by Charlie Higson. This is a young adult novel. Zombie-like creatures take over London. The only survivors are children and adolescents, who form into groups to survive, with attendant power struggles. Good yarn, very enjoyable read.

The Return Man by V.M. Zito. Good zombie yarn that held my interest.

Posted by: shoeless hunter at November 08, 2012 12:15 PM (9196u)

280 PS.

Scratch the last item, "The Return Man."

After posting that, I recalled how snarky that book is about Republicans and conservatives, whom the author posits as setting up a totalitarian US govt post zombie apocalypse.

Fuck V.M. Zito. He's a self-righteous libtard dipshit. Don't buy his stupid book.

And Mr. Zito, should you happen to stumble on this post via Google Alert, allow me to say it is *your* Democrat Party that is the party of race-based pandering, and it is the party that kills innocent women and children via hundreds of drone strikes.

And furthermore, it is the party that wins national elections primarily on the basis of the politics of personal destruction. (Google the "kill Romney" article on Politico, if you don't believe me.)

Own it, fuckhead.

Posted by: shoeless hunter at November 09, 2012 09:31 AM (9196u)






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