Sunday Morning Book Thread 04-29-2012: The Bear Necessities Edition [OregonMuse]

Good morning, morons and moronettes. I don't know about you, but I can't get enough of that falling bear pic lauraw posted earlier this week. So here it is again:


"Don't tase me, bro!"

I swear I crack up every time I look at it. That bear looks like it's being bounced around on a trampoline, like this is some modern version of bear baiting.

The artist formerly known as Sgt. Mom on 'Sgt. Stryker's Daily Brief' blog is a fine writer, and she likes to write historical fiction about the American Frontier. Here are some examples:

To Truckee's Trail.
Daughter of Texas
Deep in the Heart

She also has a couple of collections of her Sgt. Mom columns which are also available in Kindle editions.

What am I reading? Book 2 of the dragon tattoo series. I learned this week that Stieg Larsson died in 2004 and they found the manuscripts for the Millennium series only afterwards. There's supposedly a fourth manuscript that the family isn't releasing until they feel they can get a large enough buttload of kroners for it. I'm skeptical about this, but what do I know?

Also, according to Wikipedia, Larsson was a rat bastard commie. I mean, he wasn't just a fashionably Marxist academic, but was actually affiliated with or a member of Swedish rat bastard commie organizations. I didn't know this, but I guess I shouldn't be surprised. When he died, his live-in girlfriend produced a will (eventually invalidated by a Swedish court) that left all of his money and possessions to one of the Swedish rat bastard commie organizations.

So that's all I got.

As always, book thread tips may be sent to aoshqbookthread@gmail.com

So what has everyone else been reading this week? Something good, I hope.

Posted by: Open Blogger at 10:57 AM



Comments

1 Currently re-reading Heinlein's "Time Enough For Love" on the Kindle.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 11:06 AM (YdQQY)

2 Bare necessities?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ogQ0uge06o

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 11:08 AM (YdQQY)

3 "Alexander the Great" by Philip Freeman. I had read previous bios of Alexander but this is by far the most intersting. Freeman has a novelist's knack and the incredible story of Alexander reads like an adventure story. This is an incredible tale and well worth your time.

Posted by: Libra at April 29, 2012 11:08 AM (kd8U8)

4 Sgt. Mom also blogs at Chicago Boyz, often stories about events from Texas history.

Stieg Larsson was an ass, but the books are pretty good. I was actually surprised to find out his politics since it doesn't come through in the books. Mildly socialist, yes, but then he was Swedish so it was sort of expected; raving Leftist clot-brain, no, he left that part out of the books.

Posted by: John W. at April 29, 2012 11:10 AM (K7KaF)

5 Chicago Boyz at: http://chicagoboyz.net/

Don't know why the hotlink got wiped.

Posted by: John W. at April 29, 2012 11:12 AM (K7KaF)

6 I'm thinking of buying a Kindle soon, what should I go with? I don't really want the Fire because of low battery life and eye strain. Is the Touch or Keyboard better?

Posted by: JDTAY at April 29, 2012 11:12 AM (sFP59)

7 Finally finished Les Miserables. It's a real doorstop, and that's with significant amounts abridged. Apparently editors were unknown in 19th century France.

Still pretty good, though, especially if you've seen the play recently, as I have. Of course, if you're one of the philistines who doesn't appreciate Moby Dick, it's probably not for you.

Posted by: pep at April 29, 2012 11:14 AM (6TB1Z)

8 Also, according to Wikipedia, Larsson was a rat bastard commie.



Is there anyone in Sweden who is not a rat bastard commie? Don't count the Swedish Bikini Team either as they were really Americans.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 11:14 AM (YdQQY)

9 pep

it is an awesome story

Posted by: phoenixgirl at April 29, 2012 11:15 AM (Ho2rs)

10 if you have never read Uncle Tom's Cabin....i strongly suggest that you do.....it's not what they have brainwashed you into thinking it is........

Posted by: phoenixgirl at April 29, 2012 11:16 AM (Ho2rs)

11 Apparently editors were unknown in 19th century France.

There was also a tendency to pay by the word, especially in syndication.

Posted by: Fox 2! at April 29, 2012 11:17 AM (RJOgX)

12 Warning: this is ace movie review long

This week I read Tricked by Kevin Hearne. This is the fourth book in the Iron Druid Chronicles and, seriously, I love these like I love chocolate. Like I love stompy boots. Like I love tasting sweet sweet lib tears. The first three books are Hounded, Hexed and Hammered and this book is the segue into the next story arc. What I enjoy about them is that while the books are quick, fun reads, there's a lot going on underneath the surface. Ultimately, the books are about choices and dealing with the consequences and how even doing the right thing can lead to really sucky results. There's a very interesting discussion about the consequences and responsibility behind helping family members achieve immortality. Also, I want an Oberon of my very own. Very very highly recommended if you enjoy urban fantasy though this is pretty much completely romance (though not some PGish rated sex) free. Also the vampires in this are utter badasses who do not sparkle.


Next I read The Games by Ted Dosmatka. This is set in the near future where the Olympic Games now contain an event wherein each country enters a genetically modified competitor which competes to the death in round robin matches. The only rule is that no human DNA is allowed. The plot of this is that a supercomputer was allowed to program the creature and once it's born, the team that is overseeing it has no idea what it is or what it can do. It's good but it fell a little flat for me. I think some of it is that it has the standard Evil Old Man who only cares about winning, the Noble Scientist and his sidekick, the Obligatory Love Interest who is brilliant and beautiful and The Insane Computer Guy. All of that is just spiffy by me but it felt like much of the character work was left by the way side since you can simply go "oh that's the Bad Guy" and fill in the blanks. I did enjoy it, don't get me wrong, but it was right on that cusp between good pulp fiction and a better work and, to me, fell a bit short. I think some of my opinion of it suffers because I ended up stacking it on top of Fragment by Warren Fahy which is a much better work in the xeno/cryptozoology genre.

Oh and I re-read The Andromeda Strain because I realized I hadn't read it in ages and it's just as good as I remembered. God, I miss Crichton.




Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 11:17 AM (Gk3SS)

13 I'm thinking of buying a Kindle soon, what should I go with?



If you have wi-fi available at home get the standard $79 model. If you don't have wi-fi get the $139 3G model.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 11:18 AM (YdQQY)

14 Read Wool 1 and Wool 2 and reading Wool 3, pretty good dystopian sci-fi novellas, should complete the series pretty quick.

Posted by: waelse1 at April 29, 2012 11:18 AM (BMaei)

15 a book i'm currently rereading is The Book Thief by marckus zusak

i don't want to give any of it away but it is a good read

Posted by: phoenixgirl at April 29, 2012 11:18 AM (Ho2rs)

16 Ted Dosmatka = Ted Kosmatka - brb making coffee

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 11:18 AM (Gk3SS)

17 still haven't finished the hunger games....haven't picked it up in over a week.....

Posted by: phoenixgirl at April 29, 2012 11:20 AM (Ho2rs)

18 I clicked the "Friends of the Blog" link, and ended up downloading Firehearted by Sabrina Chase.

Unfortunately for Ace, I had to get it from Barnes ampersand Noble, because I have a Nook.

So far, I like the book a lot. The plot and circumstances develop, and although I usually don't care for stories with "Magic" in them, this is done differently.

Posted by: jwb7605 at April 29, 2012 11:22 AM (Qxe/p)

19 Just started How Firm A Foundation. The latest in David Weber's Safehold series.

Posted by: Hydrocarbon Liberation Front at April 29, 2012 11:22 AM (NVu2l)

20 After reading the first two books in George R R Martins A Song of Fire and Ice, I'm convinced that he can't complete the third act of a book. Anything that comes close to a resolution of sorts gets destroyed.

Posted by: Dave C at April 29, 2012 11:24 AM (LTCu7)

21 Just started reading Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" on Kindle.

I'm trying to read up on the literature of the time of the Revolutionary War. I should have done this a long time ago.

Posted by: ErikW at April 29, 2012 11:24 AM (Q8B8p)

22 I'm thinking of buying a Kindle soon, what should I go with?


I have a Kindle 2d gen which is pretty much the Kindle Keyboard and I like having the 3g available for when I'm somewhere without wifi. You can check the HQ and other sites though load times are slow. Also the IP addy that AT(and)T uses is still blocked here so you can't comment. I take it pretty much everywhere and it's nice to be able to check on news and sports scores whenever I want. If you don't care about that, or have your smartphone for that, then go with the Touch.


You may also want to look into the new Nook that has the built in light. I played with one the other day and thought it was pretty neat.

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 11:26 AM (Gk3SS)

23 bin reading several bios of Adolf Hitler ( mein Fuhrer ), concentrating on the chapters regarding how he rose quickly and was 'invited' to become Chancellor and form a government in Jan, 1933


The Nazis never got more than a third of the vote--but the commies were a close second with almost a third. All the 'democratic' parties together could only get a third of the vote in the two elections in 1932


Since 1930, Germany was governed by 'executive fiat' : Hindenburg signed whatever the Nationalist Party put in front of him. In Jan 1933 they decided they could 'harness' the National Socialists by giving Adolf the Chancellorship and three of his flunkies Cabinet posts.


Didn't work out..............

Posted by: SantaRosaStan, 100% white meat / pork at April 29, 2012 11:26 AM (Dll6b)

24 Falling out of a tree like that looks bearly legal...

Posted by: CoolCzech at April 29, 2012 11:27 AM (niZvt)

25 >>>>>Oh and I re-read The Andromeda Strain because I realized I hadn't read it in ages and it's just as good as I remembered. God, I miss Crichton.

The thing that surprised me the most about that book is I was so engrossed with it I didn't realize I was halfway through it and the guy wasn't even to the main level of the underground lab yet.

Posted by: Dave C at April 29, 2012 11:28 AM (LTCu7)

26 THESE are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the
sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their
country; but he that stands by it now, deserves the love and thanks of
man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have
this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more
glorious the triumph

Posted by: SantaRosaStan, 100% white meat / pork at April 29, 2012 11:28 AM (Dll6b)

27 I've been reading Gridlinked, some moron mentioned it in the book thread a while ago. About halfway through and I've realized I'm not attached to any of the characters and don't particularly care whether any of them live or die. All I'm doing is waiting for the author to get around to telling me for which of our many sins the intergalactics have decided humanity must be contained to the Milky Way galaxy.

Sigh.

Posted by: Anachronda at April 29, 2012 11:29 AM (6fER6)

28 You may also want to look into the new Nook that has the built in light. I played with one the other day and thought it was pretty neat.

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 11:26 AM (Gk3SS)


Is that backlit? If so, it has to be an LCD, which would make rendering text less sharp. Did you see any difference?

I was discussing that with my son-in-law a few days ago, because there's talk of getting one for my grand daughter (his niece) as a graduation present.

Posted by: jwb7605 at April 29, 2012 11:29 AM (Qxe/p)

29 Mira Grant's zombie books. They are pretty good.

Posted by: Jack at April 29, 2012 11:30 AM (zKFOT)

30 The Dragon Tattoo books were a great read even if Steig was a flaming Pinko. He did not load the books with crappy "class warfare bullshit" just some Nazi collaborator-big business garbage. Which I had no problem with as most Europeans are anti semitic, so there is a bit of truth in that. ""Hunger Games" series was better though!

Posted by: blogforce one at April 29, 2012 11:30 AM (IBzeA)

31
Started Stephen Baxter's "Stone Spring". It's about life in England (circa 7000 BC)back when it was connected to Europe via a land bridge. It has it all: Tribes, blood, guts, misery, rape and did I mention guts?? Very interesting and, as always, Baxter spreads the story around to a wide cast of characters.
Bonus: The proto-french are called snailheads. Heh.

Posted by: Tommy Gunnarson at April 29, 2012 11:31 AM (ybA9f)

32 Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 11:18 AM (YdQQY)

I have the 3G model, and while it's great for last-minute purchases, the Wi-Fi model will work for anyone with a computer, even if they don't have Wi-Fi. Material can be downloaded from the Kindle software on their PC to a Kindle.

I know you know this, but neophytes may not.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 11:33 AM (nEUpB)

33 Is that backlit? If so, it has to be an LCD, which would make rendering text less sharp. Did you see any difference?



It's my understanding that it's not backlit and it is an e-ink screen. There's a light that's built in all around the edges of the screen so when you turn the light on, there's even light across the screen. You can turn the light on and off and adjust the brightness. The text was nice and crisp. I love my kindles but if I were looking to buy a new one, this would be up there on my list.


Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 11:34 AM (Gk3SS)

34 Posted by: SantaRosaStan, 100% white meat / pork at April 29, 2012 11:28 AM (Dll6b)

He isn't taught any more in our public schools.

And that is sad.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 11:34 AM (nEUpB)

35 So the ad being shown on Ace today is Defeat Scott Walker? Seems like wasted money on the unions part there.

Posted by: Locus Ceruleus at April 29, 2012 11:37 AM (GMzH2)

36 can't remember the title but there's a good bio of Thomas Paine out there, published about 20 years ago.

Posted by: SantaRosaStan, 100% white meat / pork at April 29, 2012 11:39 AM (Dll6b)

37 Reading Last Elf of Lanis by K.J. Hargman on Kindle. It doesn't seem to be living up to its sample and I'm kicking myself for already having bought the sequel.

Almost done with Will and about 10% of the way through Agatha H and the Clockwork Princess by Phil and Kaya Foglio. Agatha H's editing isn't as good as the last volume and, being somewhat more explicit than the webcomic, I'm needing to do a little editing of my own as I read it aloud to the kids.

Posted by: Polliwog, Teahada hobbit at April 29, 2012 11:39 AM (SNQVP)

38 Fun fact: The only thing that can defeat a Scott Walker is another Scott Walker. And Chuck Norris, but that's a given.

Posted by: JDTAY at April 29, 2012 11:39 AM (sFP59)

39
Here's the start of a good book.

--------------

"What the hell goes on here?" Whitey Ardmore demanded.

They ignored his remark as they had ignored his arrival. The man at the television receiver said, "Shut up. We're listening," and turned up the volume. The announcer's voice blared out: "-Washington destroyed completely before the government could escape. With Manhattan in ruins, that leaves no-"

There was a click as the receiver was turned off. "That's that," said the man near it. "The United States is washed up." Then he added, "Anybody got a cigarette?"

----------------

The first moron to ID gets a prize of nothing!

I'm reading "Perilous Fight" by Budiansky. About the naval part of the War of 1812. The setup is good. Never understood what the issues were (other than impressment) and why the Brits wanted to do so much impressing.

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at April 29, 2012 11:40 AM (d9lOz)

40 The Fifth Column, by RAH, of course.

Posted by: Sticky Wicket at April 29, 2012 11:41 AM (L7hol)

41 Larsson was a "card carrying" member of the Commie party. Nonetheless, I enjoyed his books because he didn't preach, they are just well written mysteries. If an author can refrain from preaching I can forget the politics and just enjoy the book.

Posted by: real joe at April 29, 2012 11:41 AM (lgANn)

42 I have been fumbling around with my new Kindle Fire for more than a week now, and I still haven't decided whether it is right for me or not. I am reading Super Freakonomics on it, from Amazon via my local libraries Overdrive connectionand I am liking that a lot more than what I had been doing before. Trying to read Frank Luna's DirectX 10 book, which was my initial ebook purchase ... yeah, anddamnit I forgot to go through Ace's widget now that I think about it ... anyhow, trying to plow through that on the little screen was a disaster and a serious disappointment. I did not have my expectations aligned properly. Just not enougheyeball area compared to a real book for that kind of thing. I probably needed to get an iPad, huh. But, it is a fun little thing and seems durable and it is working just fine for my current book.

Posted by: And Irresolute at April 29, 2012 11:42 AM (RC3M9)

43 He isn't taught any more in our public schools.
And that is sad.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 11:34 AM (nEUpB)

It's blowing me away. I'm ashamed that I've been previously ignorant of him for so long.

Posted by: ErikW at April 29, 2012 11:42 AM (Q8B8p)

44 Thanks for that flashback, Vic at April 29, 2012 11:08 AM (YdQQY)

I'm somewhat ashamed to admit I have been re-reading "Scruples" by Judith Krantz. I read somewhere they are going to try to make a TV series out of it and I just couldn't help myself. The Kindle edition is so bad that I will be asking for my money back. The OCR software was having a very bad day and apparently no one could be bothered to proofread it.
And once I'm done with that, merrily back to the Third Reich we go. I am going to finishe this book. I am, I swears it.
In the car, I finished listening to "Why we get fat" by Gary Taubes, andnow I am listening to "High Heels to Tractor Wheels" by Ree Drummond - Pioneer Woman to anyone who reads her many blogs. Ree was an Oklahoma girl who moved to the big city, decided she was a big city girl, came back home for a little break before she moved to Chicago, and to her surprise,met and fell in love with a cattle rancher. It's a delightful love story, and a true one at that.

Posted by: Tonestaple at April 29, 2012 11:42 AM (VS9kC)

45
> 40 The Fifth Column, by RAH, of course.
Posted by: Sticky Wicket


Off by one!

Posted by: Comrade Arthur at April 29, 2012 11:44 AM (d9lOz)

46 Fourth? Sixth...yeah sixth. It's been many many years since I read that book. I loved it.

Posted by: Sticky Wicket at April 29, 2012 11:45 AM (L7hol)

47 I'm reading "Androids for Dummies" on Kindle.

Damn phone that's smarter than me.

Posted by: the new, improved arhooley -- now with 10% more cynicism! at April 29, 2012 11:47 AM (h842z)

48 Posted by: ErikW at April 29, 2012 11:42 AM (Q8B8p)

He articulated his love of freedom so well that more than 200 years later it rings true and current.

But I was surprised at his antipathy toward religion. It was interesting, and certainly not in step with many of the other thinkers who contributed to our founding.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 11:48 AM (nEUpB)

49 I'm somewhat ashamed to admit I have been re-reading "Scruples" by Judith Krantz.



I love Judith Krantz. Seriously, love her so very much. There's not a damn thing wrong with a little bit of brain candy. Plus she has a far better grasp of human psychology and relationships than nearly all "serious" authors. Well, that and she likes her characters. It's stunning how many authors seem to hate their characters. That's why I loathe every single thing that Annie Proulx writes, if she hates her characters, then so will I.

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 11:48 AM (Gk3SS)

50 @47

I can't wait for the smartphones to rise up and assume reign over us. It'll be an improvement.

Posted by: JDTAY at April 29, 2012 11:49 AM (sFP59)

51 47

My old dumbphone call to my wife: Push 2.

My Android call to my wife: Do unlock code. Push Home. Push Phone. Push Favorites. Push Call Wife. Push Cell. Push Dialer.


Posted by: scottst at April 29, 2012 11:52 AM (Ubyjl)

52 Good morning everyone.

Posted by: Truman North at April 29, 2012 11:54 AM (I2LwF)

53 Just started reading Thomas Paine's "Common Sense" on Kindle.



I'm trying to read up on the literature of the time of the Revolutionary War. I should have done this a long time ago.


It's a trap! And I fell in a few months ago.

Then there is that online Constitution link at the Heritage Foundation that examines it clause by clause. And the free online course by Hillsdale College.

There is a series of books of original document history published by the VFW and now in Kindle version. I got #3 Revolution last week for free so patience is rewarded. Linky here:

http://tinyurl.com/7zu2jyp

Posted by: Retread at April 29, 2012 11:54 AM (joSBv)

54 "That's why I loathe every single thing that Annie Proulx writes, if she hates her characters, then so will I."

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 11:48 AM (Gk3SS)

I read The Shipping News, and found that there wasn't anyone I particularly liked. And her style is pretentiously clipped...and very irritating.



Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 11:56 AM (nEUpB)

55 Damn phone that's smarter than me.

Posted by: the new, improved arhooley -- now with 10% more cynicism! at April 29, 2012 11:47 AM (h842z)


You ain't shitting. I'm using Kindle on RAZR and this damn thing is doing all sorts of shit I don't understand.

Posted by: ErikW at April 29, 2012 11:56 AM (Q8B8p)

56 Posted by: scottst at April 29, 2012 11:52 AM (Ubyjl)

...return phone to store.
Shove phone up salesman's ass.
Get old phone from bottom drawer.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 11:57 AM (nEUpB)

57 Alex, my complaint with Judith Krantz is too much telling, not enough showing. It takes longer to show, but it makes for a beter story and more interesting characters. Think of the scene in Gone With The Wind (book, not movie)in which Scarlett is trying to decide what to wear to the Wilkes's barbecue, and is going through every dress in her closet and thinking of how she would compare to Melanie in it. And then think of how that would have been done by Krantz: "Scarlett pulled each dress in turn from her closet and looked in the mirror. It would have to be the green sprigged muslin to get Ashley's attention away from Melanie."

I've enjoyed more than one of her books but it still feels like wasting time.

Posted by: Tonestaple at April 29, 2012 11:57 AM (VS9kC)

58 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 11:48 AM (nEUpB)

I think Beck talked about that a week or two ago. Apparently he wrote a dissertation that bordered on atheism and Ben Franklin had a fit over it.

Posted by: ErikW at April 29, 2012 11:58 AM (Q8B8p)

59 Posted by: Retread at April 29, 2012 11:54 AM (joSBv)

Awesome! Thanks Retread, I'm looking it up now.

Posted by: ErikW at April 29, 2012 12:00 PM (Q8B8p)

60 Think of the scene in Gone With The Wind (book, not movie)


Yeah. That's not the best example to use with me. I hate the book and consider being forced to watch the movie to be a violation of my human rights.


I don't think reading stuff just for fun is a waste of time at all. If you enjoy it, then it has value to you.

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 12:01 PM (Gk3SS)

61 Posted by: Retread at April 29, 2012 11:54 AM (joSBv)


And they have a great page for the original documents and sources.


http://is.gd/TDwzML

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 12:01 PM (nEUpB)

62
Took a break from the second book of Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" series to read "Intellectuals" by Paul Johnson, which Merovign recommended the other day.

Very interesting. He does a good job of providing the historical context of the times the left's favorite fuckbag humanist commie philosophers, as well as examining their personal lives.

***SPOILER WARNING***

They were all detestable pieces of narcissistic shit, who all claimed to love "humanity", yet treated individual humans like garbage.

With the exception of Karl Marx, who seemed to be more of a Greg Stilsonesque violent psychopath who wanted to see bloody revolution.

Posted by: Empire of Jeff at April 29, 2012 12:01 PM (JDIKC)

63 Thomas Paine at Gutenberg; free

http://is.gd/Oi9xAt

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 12:02 PM (YdQQY)

64 Only in the People's Republic of Boulder, Colorado. They'll cart him away to the mountains, and he'll be back by Thursday.

Posted by: Taxpayer1234 at April 29, 2012 12:02 PM (NpmCe)

65 I think Beck talked about that a week or two ago. Apparently he wrote a dissertation that bordered on atheism and Ben Franklin had a fit over it.

I thought Paine was an atheist. I could be wrong, though.

Sometimes, especially with these historical figures, it can be hard to get a good grasp on exactly what they believed.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 29, 2012 12:04 PM (InyP7)

66 Re: Elizabeth Warren


Some of my best friends are Siouxs.

Posted by: Suddenly Only 100 Dalmatians at April 29, 2012 12:04 PM (IJUs7)

67 Posted by: ErikW at April 29, 2012 11:58 AM (Q8B8p)

That what was so amazing about these men. They knew that they wanted freedom and autonomy, but they approached tha goal from widely divergent philosophies.

That they were successful speaks well of their intelligence and perseverance and wisdom. The modern picture of them (at least as taught by the leftist teachers of America) is of a monolithic bloc of rich slave owners and businessmen whose only interest was financial freedom and property rights.

That couldn't be farther from the truth.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 12:05 PM (nEUpB)

68 You're right, Alex, we all need down time, but it just seems so limited lately. Sorry about GWTW - I cut my teeth on it. Loving it is almost genetic.
And JDTAY at April 29, 2012 11:12 AM , I adore my Kindle Touch. I don't know how easy it is to readh the original in bed in a contorted position with cats and a dog sprawled on you, but I can hold the touch and turn the pages with one hand and love it for just that reason. I'm really glad I got the more expensive one. And don't hesitate to buy the one with ads - you don't see them when you're reading.

Posted by: Tonestaple at April 29, 2012 12:06 PM (VS9kC)

69 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 12:01 PM (nEUpB)

I need more than 24 hours in a day.

Posted by: Retread at April 29, 2012 12:06 PM (joSBv)

70 Posted by: Retread at April 29, 2012 12:06 PM (joSBv)

I just built another book case, and it is now full. The pile of "to be read" books just keeps growing.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 12:08 PM (nEUpB)

71 Sorry about GWTW - I cut my teeth on it. Loving it is almost genetic.



Heh, no it's fine, I am aware that I'm an outlier on this point. I nearly got thrown out of one of my college literature classes when I expressed my opinion that the only writer more overrated than Faulkner is Dickens. I had forgotten that expressing such any negative opinion of Faulkner south of the Mason Dixon line is considered grounds for homicide.

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 12:09 PM (Gk3SS)

72
Feeling slightly askew.

http://tinyurl.com/d7xyq2l

Posted by: sTevo at April 29, 2012 12:11 PM (VMcEw)

73 There are many people who say that they believe in God and/or are christian. However, their entire lives show the opposite. They do everything opposed to God. Greedy, No Giving, No charity, Mean people.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:11 PM (lkdo/)

74 Reading and implementing some ideas from "Realistic Ray Tracing". Ive combined my favorite aspects of radiosity and raytracing algorithms into my voxel engine and it looks sharp! Now to work on that frame rate.

Posted by: bernverdnardo at April 29, 2012 12:13 PM (xXhWA)

75 I thought Stieg's politics came through pretty clear in his books. He also seemed to be wholly ignorant of economics... but I repeat myself.

In fact it was so off-putting to me that I can't imagine anyone missing it.

But then I didn't think the novels were particularly good. The only part I enjoyed was seeing how outdated all of the computer technology is already. "She logged in with her superfast 300 baud modem. It was only available to the military so her genius hacker friend had hacked into the Pentagon with his super hacktastic skills to have it sent to her home instead of to some hack at the CIA. Did I mention she was a hacker."

Posted by: Voluble at April 29, 2012 12:13 PM (c8WV/)

76 Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 12:09 PM (Gk3SS)

Careful young lady, you are treading on very thin ice.

Charles Dickens is a great writer. 19th century England was a complicated social construct, and he exposed it beautifully, with whit and style.

Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 12:13 PM (nEUpB)

77 The basic $79 Kindle comes with a $30 WalMart gift card this week. Supposedly in-store only. Go to the WM home page and look for "local ad."

Posted by: Kindle Sale at April 29, 2012 12:15 PM (ILTQ1)

78 Famous Athiests include: Stephen Hawking, Brad Pitt, Angelina Jolie, George Clooney, Mark Twain, Bill Shatner, Keanu Reeves, Sir. Richard Branson, Lance Armstrong, Jodie Foster, Morgan Freeman, Teller, Johnny Depp and much of Hollywood. They are all very liberal.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:16 PM (lkdo/)

79 72

Feeling slightly askew.
http://tinyurl.com/d7xyq2l[i/]

I don't get it.

Posted by: Zombie William F. Buckley at April 29, 2012 12:17 PM (6TB1Z)

80 I thought Paine was an atheist. I could be wrong, though.

Sometimes, especially with these historical figures, it can be hard to get a good grasp on exactly what they believed.


Posted by: OregonMuse at April 29, 2012 12:04 PM (InyP7)


Most sources say he was a Deist, but he literally hated all forms of organized religion. The document that caused all the trouble was The Age of Reason in which he said the bible was a lie.

When he died he was an outcast and only had 6 people at his funeral. He was buried on his farm in NY because no church would take him. His body was later dug up and is lost to history.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 12:18 PM (YdQQY)

81 i don't know that citing a bunch of retards really helps your cause...

Posted by: C. Clavin at April 29, 2012 12:18 PM (AVfT8)

82 Posted by: CharlieBrown'sDildo (NJConservative) at April 29, 2012 12:05 PM (nEUpB)

There are a few atheists around here (I won't name them) who are conservative and although I'll admit that the concept seems a bit alien to me, it makes no difference in the larger pursuit of liberty.

Posted by: ErikW at April 29, 2012 12:19 PM (Q8B8p)

83 Charles Dickens is a great writer. 19th century England was a
complicated social construct, and he exposed it beautifully, with whit
and style.


Ooooooh, a Dickensian flame war's a-brewin'.

Posted by: Zombie William F. Buckley at April 29, 2012 12:19 PM (6TB1Z)

84 I got a job yesterday. In my chosen field. Very happy.

Posted by: Truman North at April 29, 2012 12:20 PM (I2LwF)

85 Looking for a good book on the decade or so prior to the Civil War?

Posted by: USS Diversity at April 29, 2012 12:20 PM (cjTjM)

86 Zombie William F. Buckley = pep

Posted by: pep at April 29, 2012 12:20 PM (6TB1Z)

87 There are many people who say that they believe in God and/or are christian. However, their entire lives show the opposite. They do everything opposed to God. Greedy, No Giving, No charity, Mean people.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:11 PM (lkdo/)

Well, Obama claims to be a Christian thus proving your point.

Posted by: ErikW at April 29, 2012 12:23 PM (Q8B8p)

88 @ 70

Given all the free original document stuff available, the best money I spent on books recently turns out to be the Kindle Fire. The TBR pile is getting out-of-control-scary, far worse than a kid in a candy store.


Posted by: Retread at April 29, 2012 12:24 PM (joSBv)

89 Diversity, do you mean in the United States, or in the world? Because the 1850s were some crazy shit in Europe.

Posted by: Truman North at April 29, 2012 12:24 PM (I2LwF)

90 Yay Truman! Congrats! Can you tell us what/where it is?

Posted by: Tami at April 29, 2012 12:25 PM (X6akg)

91 Stieg's politics came through only to the extent that you could discern his beliefs from his writing. I maintain that he did not get preachy. One's worldview is bound to be revealed from one's work. A fish doesn't know it's in water.

Posted by: real joe at April 29, 2012 12:25 PM (lgANn)

92 Looking for a good book on the decade or so prior to the Civil War?

Posted by: USS Diversity at April 29, 2012 12:20 PM (cjTjM)



If you really want to get a feel for the history of the South prior to the late war of unpleasantness read this book by Walter Edgar.

http://is.gd/IYRD64

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 12:26 PM (YdQQY)

93 I got a job yesterday. In my chosen field. Very happy.
Posted by: Truman North at April 29, 2012 12:20 PM (I2LwF)
-----------------------------------------------------------
Awesome! So you would say that Barack Obama has made your dreams come true, right?

Posted by: NPR Journalist at April 29, 2012 12:26 PM (jucos)

94 When he died he was an outcast and only had 6 people at his funeral

That's at least 5 more than I expect to be at mine...we are counting the guy with the shovel, right?

Posted by: garrett at April 29, 2012 12:26 PM (cDpBS)

95 USS Diversity, if you find one, please post. I don't like reading about the Civil War much because one sister and brother-in-law are such fanatics about it, to the point that the BIL disdained my interest in the Revolutionary War.

I keep thinking that the best way to learn American History better would be to read a biography of each president in order. In my copious free time, of course.

Posted by: Tonestaple at April 29, 2012 12:27 PM (VS9kC)

96 His body was later dug up and is lost to history.

Yeah, that's right, lost to history.

Posted by: Herbert West, Re-Animator at April 29, 2012 12:27 PM (T+Z2Q)

97 jwb7605, glad you are enjoying the book!

Alert to all Nook-owning Morons! The Long Way Home, the first book in my new science fiction trilogy is available in epub format at my online store until Thursday evening, when I do the whole Amazon Select thing for three months. (Link to store in my name) Also have the Kindle format if anyone wants to jump the gun. As before, there's lots of chases, escapes, and deeds of derring-do, PLUS hotshot pilots and mysterious aliens.

Posted by: Sabrina Chase at April 29, 2012 12:28 PM (wfSF5)

98 Recent:
Drew Magary - The Postmortal
Ayn Rand - The Fountainhead
John Birmingham - Designated Targets
All well worth reading

Posted by: Gern Blansden at April 29, 2012 12:29 PM (4qU0l)

99 Congratulations, Truman! Unemployment blows. I hope you will enjoy your new job as much as I have enjoyed mine, and I hope you'll have as much work, thereby guaranteeing your continued gainful employment (as much as such a thing can be guaranteed).

Posted by: Tonestaple at April 29, 2012 12:29 PM (VS9kC)

100 Charles Dickens is a great writer. 19th century England was a complicated social construct, and he exposed it beautifully, with whit and style.



And in 20,000,000 words more than necessary.


Actually, this is what I love about literature, different works speak to different people. Let's take The Dragon Tattoo books. It's an utter mystery to me (no pun intended) as to why people like them. I don't think the mystery is particularly mysterious and if I want torture porn I'll watch Hostel. But others like them a great deal and good for them. I can't stand Dickens but I think James Joyce is amazing. I know others who have exactly the opposite reaction. There's something out there that will be meaningful to you and just because it's not to me doesn't mean either of us are wrong. Unless you like the recent works of Maya Angelou. In which case, you're wrong.


It is interesting to me to read what is currently considered High Literature compared to the Great Works. For the most part, there's a sense of, if not optimism, at least some hope in the Great Works. Current works are nihilistic to the core. It's *boring*. I was reading Never Let Me Go by Ishiguro, who is supposed to be this modern genius, and I was rolling my eyes so hard they almost fell out of my head. Yes, yes, humanity is awful and what does it mean to be human and yawwwwwwn. Give me Shakespeare any day for that.

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 12:29 PM (Gk3SS)

101 Just don't get caught in a train wreck with your mistress. Oh. And it's best to be paid by the word.

Posted by: zombie charles dickens at April 29, 2012 12:31 PM (nU/dt)

102 wikipedia org/wiki/James_Beckwourth

Beckwourth forged a northern route that forked from the Truckee Trail near Reno. Born of African, Scottish and Indian heritage, he was larger than life; bear wrestler, scout, former slave, and explorer.

Posted by: 13times at April 29, 2012 12:32 PM (h6XiD)

103 93 I got a job yesterday. In my chosen field. Very happy. Posted by: Truman North at April 29, 2012 12:20 PM (I2LwF) ----------------------------------------------------------- Awesome! So you would say that Barack Obama has made your dreams come true, right?
Posted by: NPR Journalist at April 29, 2012 12:26 PM (jucos)


lol in a manner of speaking... I'm helping to manage a congressional candidate's campaign

Posted by: Truman North at April 29, 2012 12:32 PM (I2LwF)

104 Oh. And it's best to be paid by the word.

or the inch...

Posted by: Zombie John Holmes at April 29, 2012 12:32 PM (cDpBS)

105 My grandfather was a devout christian and had over 1700 people at his funeral. Hopefully I will get a few hundred. Pretty close to some pastors and monks too.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:32 PM (lkdo/)

106 Well, I'm good until September 8th anyway. Primary day.

Posted by: Truman North at April 29, 2012 12:34 PM (I2LwF)

107 I've been reading a bunch of Iain M. Banks space operas lately. I got a copy of Surface Detail and read that, and then went back and reread Use of Weapons (for reasons which those who have read Surface Detail will understand, and which I can't reveal to those who haven't), and now I'm rereading Consider Phlebas.

Something I hadn't noticed before: Banks pads the living shit out of his books. Seriously. Nobody can just go anywhere without a whole bunch of ultimately pointless adventures along the way. Consider Phlebas spends literally half the book in that kind of meandering. Surface Detail has one entire main character (the Quietus agent) who does absolutely nothing in the story. Excession has another completely pointless main character (the teenage agent). He's good enough to make his pointless digressions seem exciting and interesting on first reading, but upon rereading one thinks, "Huh?" Use of Weapons and Player of Games are leaner, more focused, and better.

Something else I had noticed, but which gets more irritating the second time around: Banks is a big fat hypocrite. He occasionally brings the narrative to a screeching halt so his characters can look out at the audience like G.I. Joe cartoon characters giving an antidrug message, and say something like "Capital punishment is bad, mkay?" Then fifty pages later one of the Culture operatives kills someone in an extremly bloody, sadistic way because they were a Bad Person. Huh? Rich people in non-Culture societies are shown as decadent and sexually perverse -- but when Culture people like kinky sex it shows how healthy and un-hung-up they are. Huh?

Now I like his books, but this sort of thing is like a pebble in my shoe.

Posted by: Trimegistus at April 29, 2012 12:35 PM (4rD2K)

108 The bear on the mattress is no where near as funny as the tranq'd bear on on the trampoline...

http://tinyurl.com/flyin-bear

Posted by: Bob in Houston at April 29, 2012 12:35 PM (b7AU3)

109 I know christians who attend atheists burials to pray for them. Hollywood people need this prayer.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:35 PM (lkdo/)

110 I m going to put in and old classic which I am beginning to re-read: Quo Vadis by Henryk Sienkiewicz. It is hard reading until you get accustomed to it, but it has accurate historical detail of ancient Rome and early Christianity.

The title comes from the apocryphal tale of Peter meeting Christ as he was fleeing Rome. "Quo vadis, domine?" (Where are you going, Lord?)

Christ answered, "To Rome, to be crucified again." Peter turned and went back to Rome to his martyrdom.

Sienkiewicz won the Nobel prize for literature and was from Poland. The novel was originally written in Polish. It is MUCH better than the Hollywood movie of the 50's.

Posted by: Miss Marple at April 29, 2012 12:36 PM (GoIUi)

111 Thanks for the CW info.....I'm thinking the US in those days, how it must have been to get people to take up arms against family and countrymen.

Posted by: USS Diversity at April 29, 2012 12:40 PM (cjTjM)

112 If you're bored, go look at Kurt Schlichter's (Breitbart contributor) Twitter feed. He's in a Tweet war with "Bronies", a group of grown men who live vicariously through the "My Little Pony" kids show. One of the "bronies" made a nine minute video defending himself. Comedy classic.

Posted by: Lincolntf at April 29, 2012 12:40 PM (hiMsy)

113 That's at least 5 more than I expect to be at mine...we are counting the guy with the shovel, right?

Posted by: garrett at April 29, 2012 12:26 PM (cDpBS)



LOL, actually that is close. One of the 6 was the coffin maker and the only reason he was there was to try to get paid.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 12:40 PM (YdQQY)

114 Something else I had noticed, but which gets more irritating the second time around: Banks is a big fat hypocrite.



Oh man, I find Banks unreadable just for that reason. Also doesn't he try to do the stuff where the "Iain Banks" stuff is Serious Literature and the "Iain M. Banks" stuff is the sci-fi and that doesn't count? I remember that Hot Fuzz has a great running gag about that with one of the twins reading one and the other twin reading the other.

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 12:41 PM (Gk3SS)

115 107
Something I hadn't noticed before:
Banks pads the living shit out of his books. Seriously. Nobody can just
go anywhere without a whole bunch of ultimately pointless adventures
along the way.


---------

Could be worse. I recently re-read Mission of Gravity. It's set on a planet inhabited by sentient centipedes in which gravity ranges from 3g at the equator to about 700g at the poles. It's a travelogue of some traders from the high-g region recruited while they were in the low-g region to locate and recover a probe lost near the poles. A lot of stuff happens in the 3g to 12g area, then *nothing* until they get near the probes. Although the book is great fun, the hole in the trip is blatant and annoying.

Posted by: Anachronda at April 29, 2012 12:41 PM (6fER6)

116 From Drudge...


"House Republicans investigating the Fast and Furious scandal plan to
pursue a contempt citation against Attorney General Eric Holder, senior
congressional aides told CBS News."

http://tinyurl.com/cyjnqf6

Posted by: An Observation at April 29, 2012 12:42 PM (ylhEn)

117 Sounds like a good book Miss Marple. Peter was a great man. Christians have always lived on the edges of society and entered the city to battle the most corrupt city leaders. Paul was persecuted by Roman city leaders. My pastor even said that he would not want Paul in his church. Paul would rip things up that were not right. Imagine what Paul would do if he was in Washington DC right now? We REALLY need some Peters and Pauls right now in USA.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:42 PM (lkdo/)

118 ...he was there was to try to get paid.

That's how you do it!

Posted by: garrett at April 29, 2012 12:42 PM (cDpBS)

119
A coyote just ran thru the yard. No shooting on Sundays.

Posted by: sTevo at April 29, 2012 12:43 PM (VMcEw)

120 A pastor told me that God likes it when we attend others funerals (even people that we do not know well). I should attend more funerals.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:46 PM (lkdo/)

121 "Stieg Larsson died in 2004 and they found the manuscripts for the Millennium series only afterwards."

Not quite. He had already made a deal with his Swedish publisher for all three books, but they had not yet come out. Of course no one knew they would turn into such a sensation. Larsson died of a heart attack while climbing the stairs to his office (he worked at a political magazine similar to the fictional Millennium and wrote the books in his spare time, for "relaxation"). The fourth manuscript is said to be unfinished, so the estate needs to find someone to complete it.

Posted by: sauropod at April 29, 2012 12:46 PM (iAkDQ)

122 Some liberals don't even believe in funerals.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:47 PM (lkdo/)

123 97
The Long Way Home ... As before, there's lots of chases, escapes, and deeds of
derring-do, PLUS hotshot pilots and mysterious aliens.


Posted by: Sabrina Chase at April 29, 2012 12:28 PM (wfSF5)

--------
I've also read this. Highly recommended; the lady can write. She also does a maddeningly good job of finding a good place to end a book, leaving you salivating for the next.

Posted by: Anachronda at April 29, 2012 12:47 PM (6fER6)

124 Steig Larsson sucked

Posted by: Dagny, warrior queen at April 29, 2012 12:49 PM (4yXmp)

125
Inside the KGB[/]

and

The Final Entries 1945
The Diary of Joseph Goebbels


I guess I'm not much on classic literature.

Posted by: Ed Anger - Certified Kos Kid at April 29, 2012 12:51 PM (7+pP9)

126 or closing tags.

Posted by: Ed Anger - Certified Kos Kid at April 29, 2012 12:52 PM (7+pP9)

127 No Weddings.
No Funerals.

Posted by: garrett at April 29, 2012 12:53 PM (cDpBS)

128 That bear picture reminds me of a Goya painting - http://tinyurl.com/6p3wc4k

Posted by: weew at April 29, 2012 12:53 PM (ElfHn)

129 Am I the only one that thinks Dicken's Mr. Pip was a fucking idiot. "The portable property" and all that.

Posted by: Jimbo at April 29, 2012 12:54 PM (O3R/2)

130 Goya?
That's older than the Constitution!

Posted by: Ezra Klein at April 29, 2012 12:54 PM (cDpBS)

131 Once discussion at my local church was that no funeral is not important. I should attend a funeral even if all friends and relatives have abandoned a person. Even if I was the only christian in attendance at the funeral I can pray for the person.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:54 PM (lkdo/)

132 Imagine what Paul would do if he was in Washington DC right now?

If he was smart, he'd steal a car and get the fuck out as fast as possible.

Posted by: Purple Avenger at April 29, 2012 12:54 PM (bezvC)

133 I mean..even if i was the only person at the funeral,, I could pray for the person who died.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:55 PM (lkdo/)

134
Remember how Mitt Romney was all about the "conservative red meat" issues of abortion and immigration during the primaries?

He's not gonna do that, anymore.

Oh wait, that never happened; the AP completely made it up.

And aren't abortion and immigration "red meat" issues for the Left, too?

Posted by: Soothsayer at April 29, 2012 12:56 PM (VHL8n)

135 Purple Avenger, yeah they would probably be trying to assassinate Paul. But Paul had that kind of courage! Scripture says we should be courageous. I am working on this.

Posted by: Lampshade at April 29, 2012 12:57 PM (lkdo/)

136 Hi all. I finished reading the latest book from Sharon Penman called Lionheart last week. It's an historical fiction about Richard I (of course) and his attempt to wrest control of Jerusalem from the clutches of Saladin in the third crusade. Not her best effort as far as I'm concerned. I much preferred her book Devil's Brood about Henry II and his warring children or my favorite book of her's, Here Be Dragons which is the story of King John (yes of Robin Hood fame and no it's not that story) and his tumultuous reign.
After reading all that dramatic stuff I like to read something quick and light so I picked up and reread Terry Pratchett's A Hat Full of Sky. If you've never read any of his stuff you are missing out on one of life's great pleasures. He manages to blend an inventive fantasy world with wonderfully colorful characters and hold it all together with nonstop British humor. He has written about a bazillion of these Discworld novels and every one of them is pure delight.

Posted by: Jay at April 29, 2012 12:58 PM (nojhZ)

137 "I never met a prayerful man that was a coward." - Matthew Kelly

Posted by: Jimbo at April 29, 2012 12:59 PM (O3R/2)

138 And aren't abortion and immigration "red meat" issues for the Left, too?


No, no, no, remember the Left has the moral high ground on those issues so it's not "red meat", it's defending truth, justice and all that stuff from the ravening horde.

Posted by: alexthechick - SMOD 2012 at April 29, 2012 01:00 PM (Gk3SS)

139 "Hi all. I finished reading the latest book from Sharon Penman called Lionheart"

That was a great movie. Van Damme at his best.

Posted by: bernverdnardo at April 29, 2012 01:01 PM (xXhWA)

140
http://tinyurl.com/cnp5hos

JEF-lore

Posted by: sTevo at April 29, 2012 01:02 PM (VMcEw)

141 136 Ohh. You discoverd Sharon Kaye Penman. I've read them all. Each one is a little history course. Love them. Have read everyone multiple times. Wish there were more books like hers out there that I could wallow in.

Posted by: Dagny, warrior queen at April 29, 2012 01:02 PM (4yXmp)

142 #135 Seriously, that book makes you realize what a miracle it is that the Church survived. And the persecutions were more than just lions. They devised all sorts of horrible ways to kill people both to intimidate the Christians into recanting and to entertain the populace.

Most of that has been sanitized or erased from modern history. Sienkiewicz was scrupulous in his history and being accurate, based on Roman accounts at the time.

The EPA, apparently, has been reading Roman history, however, which does make one wonder what else they have up their sleeves.

Posted by: Miss Marple at April 29, 2012 01:04 PM (GoIUi)

143 Reading "Merchants of Despair" by Robert Zubrin. Zubrin has a phD in Nuclear Physics, but this book reads as if he paid attention in English classes.

He lays out the anithumanism that has run rampant throughout the world since Thomas Malthus and Charles Darwin, through to present day Planned Parenthood and US world aid being conditioned upon adherence to population control policies

Starts with the Irish potato famine and how Malthus' influence on the British royalty led to policies that starved these scourges upon the earth. Survival of the fittest meant that we must allow lessers to die, no intervention allowed.

I'm halfway through, but it is apparent that he's setting up the global warming/deindustrialization greenies to be merchants of death on a spectacular scale.

He weaves the thread through Malthus/Darwin/Eugenics/Nazis/Planned Parenthood/Earth Day (Lenin's birthday, btw)/ Population Bomb Erlich and on to present day- seamlessly. These are all the same people, there is direct correlation from Mathus to current day ruling class elites.

Really an eye opener for me. I'm getting the distinct impression that these "elites" want us mostly dead.


Posted by: Derak at April 29, 2012 01:05 PM (UVGtI)

144 #143 Having dealt with Medicare for my parents, I can believe that they do, indeed want us dead.

I have a friend who thinks that they would be happy if they could hurry us older Americans off this mortal coil as quickly as possible, because we are the ones who remember what the country was like before the leftists gained control of the culture, universities, and finally, government.

Posted by: Miss Marple at April 29, 2012 01:08 PM (GoIUi)

145 How accurate was the book Lionheart? Did they "holywood" it up the way they did with the Errol Flynn Robin Hood movie?


For example Richard I never set foot in England and could not even speak English.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 01:08 PM (YdQQY)

146 I like the bouncing bear picture, but it's not Lauraw's best.

That award has to go to "Squirrel Eating a Breadstick."

http://goo.gl/4E3SQ

Posted by: Secret Service Chaperone at April 29, 2012 01:10 PM (IoNBC)

147 I am reading On A Sea of Glass: The Life and Loss of The RMS Titanic by Tad Fitch, J. Kent Layton, and Bill Wormstedt. The authors use inquiry testimony, numerous other archived survivor accounts, and forensic research to piece together the story of Titanic from the time of her conception through the modern period, as well as to examine Titanic myths and misconceptions. This is the most thorough Titanic book I have ever read (including the 50+pp of endnotes plus tables, illustrations, and photographs throughout) and does the best job of explaining what happened based on the available evidence. With regards to the latter, the authors demonstrate that some conclusions promoted by even some Titanic historians are actually untrue or appear to be untrue (e.g., Captain Smith was actually not a weak leader and he probably did not go down with the ship).

Posted by: Miss80sBaby at April 29, 2012 01:11 PM (d6QMz)

148 "Tutt and Mr. Tutt" by Arthur Cheney Train @ gutenberg. Verrry funny.

"A Pride of Royals" by Justin Scott. It's a WWI James Bond-esque story and quite entertaining.


Posted by: microcosme at April 29, 2012 01:13 PM (+Rgcp)

149 145 Penman is historically accurate from what I can tell and I've studied british history my whole life. In fact, that's whats on my ipod. Princeton British history lectures and Cambridge. I know. I'm a geek.

Posted by: Dagny, warrior queen at April 29, 2012 01:13 PM (4yXmp)

150 @ 141 If you like Penman have you tried Dorothy Dunnett? Not everyone's cup of tea but accurate history and vivid descriptions. Writen to be re-read.

Posted by: Retread at April 29, 2012 01:15 PM (joSBv)

151

I just put my Kindle down to read this blog.

Does that count?

Posted by: Sshhhh at April 29, 2012 01:17 PM (HOOye)

152 I've been reading "Freedom Betrayed" by Calvin Coolidge (I forget the editor). Put that with the first few chapters of "Dark Sun" by Richard Rhodes and it's very lucky for the Unitd States that Roosevelt did not survive the end of World War II.
He had a great admiration for his Uncle Joe, and we would have given them much,much more than all our industrial secrets and Eastern Europe. The communists leaving his administration when Truman took over must have looked like rats fleeing a sinking ship. What a scoundrel he must have been.
Barack is indeed the second coming, but with more opposition and term limits, thank God.

Posted by: Advo at April 29, 2012 01:18 PM (oD/3o)

153 Robert Low's Oathsworn series is great fun, I've passed the books around after reading and people loved them. Bad-ass Vikings, mead, pillaging and wenching, lots of swords,axes, and other good fun Viking stuff, Attila the Hun's tomb. A real blast to read.
The Prow Beast
The Whale Road
The White Raven
The Wolf Sea
Bernal Diaz del Castillo's classic "The True History of the Conquest of New
Spain", written by a conquistador in Cortez' army. Science fiction can't top this astonishing story of a few Spaniards vs. the Aztec world, as alien as anything in imagined fiction.

Posted by: JHW at April 29, 2012 01:19 PM (Em/DQ)

154 I have not finished the books I've been reading for a few weeks. Mostly because I got sidetracked by deciding to re-read a bunch of old romance novels by Julia Quinn, Stephanie Laurens, and Victoria Alexander.

I tried to peruse Amazon to find some new ones to read but a)Amazon is not organized at all in line with my mental process for "perusing" so it was an exercise in frustration and b)once I would find a book that looked interesting I would make the mistake of reading the reviews which would immediately put me off the book.

I still kind of miss the suck that was Borders, they at least organized things in a way that made it easy for me to meander and find something. Barnes and Noble doesn't organize the same way, so I find it frustrating to browse there as well.

I believe this entire comment falls under "first world problems"

Posted by: ParanoidGirlInSeattle at April 29, 2012 01:20 PM (RZ8pf)

155 "In beauty, the memory of divinity remains"


---Humberto Eco, although he may have been quoting someone else

Posted by: SantaRosaStan, 100% white meat / pork at April 29, 2012 01:20 PM (Dll6b)

156 141. Wish there were more books like hers out there that I could wallow in.

Try Edward Rutherford. Great historical fiction epics on the order of James Michener. But I think Rutherford is much more readable than Michener.

Also try Conn Iggulden. He wrote a great historical fiction series about Genghis Khan.

Posted by: Jay at April 29, 2012 01:22 PM (nojhZ)

157 156 I've read every Edmund Rutherford many many many times. He's my favorite. I've even read Russka more than once. I've also read all the Micheners.
I'll try Iggulden and Dorthy Dunnett.

Posted by: Dagny, warrior queen at April 29, 2012 01:27 PM (4yXmp)

158 I mean Edward. I always do that because Rutherford reminds me of London which reminds me of Edmund Pevensie.

Posted by: Dagny, warrior queen at April 29, 2012 01:28 PM (4yXmp)

159 I read "A Distant Eden" by Lloyd Tackitt. An interesting take on what would happen if the power grid went out. Not pretty, but it makes you think. I've been too naive in my thinking about how robust things are in modern civilization.

Posted by: Mr Tea at April 29, 2012 01:31 PM (tt8nf)

160 Mr Tea, have you read One Second After? It is about what happens after an EMP. It completely changed my thinking about that sort of a thing and had me re-evaluating if I'd really like to live in a post-apocalyptic world like that.

Posted by: ParanoidGirlInSeattle at April 29, 2012 01:35 PM (RZ8pf)

161 I just remembered two authors of historical fiction that I really liked: Gwen Bristow and Frances Parkinson Keyes. My favorite of Keyes was called "Steamboat Gothic." It's set right after the Civil War and involves a man, really a carpetbagger, who meets up with a widow somehow, comes to her aid to prevent starvation, eventually marries her and moves to Louisiana to run a plantation there and a steamboat line. It's quite a tale.

Gwen Bristow's books are generally shorter and less involved, but still very enjoyable. I can't vouch for their historical accuracy but I particularly liked "Jubilee Trail" (well-bred New York girl marries a man who trades between the east and California), "Calico Palace" (nice girl marries too fast and is abandoned in San Francisco of the Gold Rush) and, all time favorite, "Celia Garth" (nice orphan girl who can "make a dress that really fits" gets mixed up in the Revolutionary War). If they were movies, they'd probably be period-piece chick-flicks, but I do like them.

Posted by: Tonestaple at April 29, 2012 01:37 PM (VS9kC)

162 I read "A Distant Eden" by Lloyd Tackitt. An interesting take on what would happen if the power grid went out.



Read dies the fire by S.M. Stirling for a good account of how fast stuff will go to shit and what people need to do to survive. Besides, it is a damn good story.



However, for the enti9re grid to collapse a world shattering even would have to occur. I don't think EMP alone would do it.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 01:39 PM (YdQQY)

163 @ 158 Dagny, if you try Dunnett, I suggest you start with "The Game Of Kings." It's the first in a series but complete in itself. As it is, you'll be wondering who the hell all these people are but much better than starting in the middle of the series, which is even more confusing.

Posted by: Retread at April 29, 2012 01:40 PM (joSBv)

164 #85USS DIVERSITY. The best book I have found on the decade (s) prior to the Civil War is "The Impending Crisis" by DavidM Pottter. Covers the years between the Mexican War and the Civil War. Not dull; good interesting writing.

Posted by: Libra at April 29, 2012 01:43 PM (kd8U8)

165 In the Millenium trilogy, just about every man is a sadist, every businessman is a monster, and every right of center pol is a neonazi.

Don't even get me started on the translation. Those books are poorly written narcissistic trash. I couldn't even finish the third one. I recall it was about a vast right-wing conspiracy.

Posted by: Jordan at April 29, 2012 01:57 PM (RSG1I)

166 #145. Great question. I wish I could tell you with authority how accurate she is but I just don't have the knowledge. I will tell you that the reviews that she gets always tout her accuracy and attention to detail. Sadly, I cannot testify to her historical accuracy myself.

Posted by: Jay at April 29, 2012 02:02 PM (nojhZ)

167 Re-reading Robert Harris's "Enigma." Book is far, far better than the wretched 2001 movie. Bletchley Park was an amazing operation.

Posted by: Doug at April 29, 2012 02:06 PM (ILTQ1)

168 165 ditto

Posted by: Dagny, warrior queen at April 29, 2012 02:10 PM (4yXmp)

169 I have the game of kings (dunnet) on my dresser. Haven't been able to get it started?

Posted by: Dagny, warrior queen at April 29, 2012 02:12 PM (4yXmp)

170 I'm on book Four of Spike Milligan's WWII memoirs. It may sound like a lot but the volumes are pretty short with a lot of space given over to drawings and photos.

Early on, the division on whether Banks used his middle initial was to distinguish SF from Horror. Later he decided to get into Serious Literature mode under the longer name.

The trick in the big Banks SF novels is 'Guess the Preacher.' One of the major character will never do anything critical to advancing the story. They exist solely to deliver a sermon or to be an object of the narrative sermon.

Posted by: epobirs at April 29, 2012 02:15 PM (kcfmt)

171 "Kill Me If You Can" by James Patterson was fast and fun. $15 million in diamonds stolen from the Russian mob found by an art student in Grand Central Station during an explosive first few pages just keeps the plot going and going. The potential for stories starring the main character would keep my attention for a series of books.

Posted by: i like anchors 2012 at April 29, 2012 02:16 PM (LCZ3l)

172 Read dies the fire by S.M. Stirling for a good account of how fast
stuff will go to shit and what people need to do to survive.


Warning - read Dies the Fire only if you really, really, really want
someone to jam everything about Wicca down your throat.

Posted by: Waterhouse at April 29, 2012 02:17 PM (T+Z2Q)

173 Conquistador by SM Stirling is very imaginative and appealing to outdoor types without preachy Sierra club crap.

Posted by: Red in Maine at April 29, 2012 02:27 PM (Or/ft)

174 One has to take Stirling's choice for characters with several grains of salt. He likes to add "shock value" to his books.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 02:29 PM (YdQQY)

175 174

Especially the Draka series.

Posted by: Red in Maine at April 29, 2012 02:33 PM (Or/ft)

176 "One Second After" was on my list, but "dies the fire" was not. Dies the fire's premise seems good too. Thanks for the recommendations. I still have problems with things going toward total anarchy in a few days. In the cities, maybe, but not everywhere.

Posted by: Mr Tea at April 29, 2012 02:40 PM (tt8nf)

177
I have the game of kings (dunnet) on my dresser. Haven't been able to get it started?


All I can say is try, try again. Dunnett is great at showing instead of telling and that means she makes you work to understand what is going on and who is the hero. She was also a painter and has an exceptional eye for description. She isn't a light, quick read but worth the effort, imho.

Posted by: Retread at April 29, 2012 02:42 PM (joSBv)

178 Especially the Draka series.

Posted by: Red in Maine at April 29, 2012 02:33 PM (Or/ft)


LOL, the one that got me was the main character in Island In The Sea of Time. A black lesbian coast guard captain.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 02:44 PM (YdQQY)

179 I'm re-reading (again) Lovette's "The Snubby Revolver". Very many pointers in it, all worth remembering, which is what motivates my re-reading.

Posted by: Arbalest at April 29, 2012 02:54 PM (lrjBr)

180 Thanks Libra

Posted by: USS Diversity at April 29, 2012 02:54 PM (cjTjM)

181 Waterhouse, is that the Wicca with the naked gingers chicks or the one with the fat, hippy lesbians.

Posted by: Jean at April 29, 2012 03:01 PM (RURIy)

182 Given the recent focus on colonizing Mars and Mormons, Snodgrass' Circuit series is good.

Posted by: Jean at April 29, 2012 03:06 PM (RURIy)

183 Naked gingers- some are grandmothers.

Posted by: Red in Maine at April 29, 2012 03:07 PM (Or/ft)

184 Guess Im the only one here.

Posted by: Jean at April 29, 2012 03:07 PM (RURIy)

185
Ran out of new stuff, so I'm re-reading Stephen Pressfield's Killing Rommel. Those LRDGsquaddies were hard men.
Decided to order FootFall and The Mote in God's Eye --haven't read them in years, and I'm curious whether they stand the test of time.

Posted by: Old Tired Guy at April 29, 2012 03:08 PM (uRNRf)

186 I'm still here.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 03:12 PM (YdQQY)

187 Footfall was good.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 03:13 PM (YdQQY)

188 Lucifer's Hammer always entertained me. Nothing beats a well run nuclear facility.

Posted by: Red in Maine at April 29, 2012 03:18 PM (Or/ft)

189 Seth Godin's "Linchpin". It's inspirational.

Actually changing my life after reading it. Interesting perspectives on the new reality of the new workplace/economy.

Posted by: '52 Esquire at April 29, 2012 03:24 PM (KZi9D)

190 Let's not forget Ken Follett's Pillars Of The Earth and World Without End. Great historical fiction although I think more fiction than historical. Both a fantastic read.

Posted by: Jay at April 29, 2012 03:39 PM (nojhZ)

191 If you want a good history of early California, read "Two Years Before the Mast" by Richard Henry Dana. The Bandini and Pico Families in San Diego weren't, how shall I phrase it, enterprising.

I loved the story of him renting horses and riding up to the Mission San Diego de Alcala and getting a free meal from the Franciscans.

I also like the story of the wedding in Santa Barbara and then meeting the lady years later, who was grateful to him for kind words in his book regarding her.

Posted by: Jimbo at April 29, 2012 03:45 PM (O3R/2)

192 So, is this our little secret? We are morons, and yet, we are so well educated and so well read?

The Left really, really hates that we have broken free.


Posted by: Jimbo at April 29, 2012 03:49 PM (O3R/2)

193 Mockingjay

Posted by: nlynch at April 29, 2012 04:01 PM (NFChR)

194 Err that should have been Freedom Betrayed by Herbert Hoover. I guess I AM a moron, after all.

Posted by: Advo at April 29, 2012 04:48 PM (oD/3o)

195 "Two years before the mast" is on gutenberg.org, I think.

And damn the Kindle. It's way to easy to buy books. I just decided to get a Kindle copy of "Lucifer's Hammer" which lead to "The Mote in God's Eye" which almost led to "Footfall" but it doesn't seem to be on Kindle and then I said, knock it off, and then I said, no, I need one more novel that I have read to pieces, so I got "Shogun" which I adore.

For some reason, I think I bought a book on self-control. I should see if I can find it.

Posted by: Tonestaple at April 29, 2012 05:42 PM (VS9kC)

196 Miss Marple: I found Quo Vadis? so interesting in so many ways, but chiefly for the picture painted as to how radical Christianity was, how utterly different a view of Man. Fascinating book. The movie was execrable, however.

Posted by: Jaclyn at April 29, 2012 06:15 PM (YrSL3)

197 I am so grateful for this thread every week. I usually come away with a few suggestions.

Posted by: Jaclyn at April 29, 2012 06:16 PM (YrSL3)

198 I have been thinking about getting shogun for the Kindle but it is priced too high (by the publisher). There is no reason why it should be $9 other than that is what they are charging for the paperback.



All the publishers should be like Baen. Their prices run from free to 4 or 5 dollars for the older books. The new ones are higher but not as high as the hardback.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 06:16 PM (YdQQY)

199 Quo vadis?

I thought that that was the question Jesus asked Peter when he saw him running away from Rome.

Where are you going? This is where you will be crucified.

Posted by: Jimbo at April 29, 2012 06:25 PM (O3R/2)

200 BTW, the paperback copy of Shogun that I have was only $3.50 so there is no reason that they should not be charging $3.50 for the kindle.

Posted by: Vic at April 29, 2012 06:25 PM (YdQQY)

201 Miss Marple: I found Quo Vadis? so interesting in so many ways, but chiefly for the picture painted as to how radical Christianity was, how utterly different a view of Man. Fascinating book. The movie was execrable, however.

You need to watch the 2005 version that was produced for Polish TV, available on Netflix. It's in 6 or 7 parts and very much better than the earlier movie.

Posted by: OregonMuse at April 29, 2012 06:41 PM (InyP7)

202 Late to the show here: I'm doing my best to complete "Citizens" by Simon Schama about the French Revolution. I just got through the chapter on the terror that the Jacobin fuckheads caused where they made about as much sense as the OWS vermin. There were a lot of good people who were butchered by the spawn of Hell and it was a good example of what mob action can produce. I just got through the execution of Marie Antoinette, who undeservedly gets caricatured by the ignorant assholes that are responsible for misleading the clown car that's called historical education in our national disgrace called public schools. Schama himself is pretty fucking retarded politically himself these days but this was written when he still had a functioning cortex; my point in saying that is that even as a lefty in the 80s he still was writing what he did with no overt concern for the political impact. Sadly it seems the brain slugs have been very active since then.


Since the death of Levon Helm I've started reading "Across The Great Divide" about the formation of the group The Band. It's pretty well done, I guess, but I've pretty much maxed out on reading about white boys finding out about black music on late night radio; frankly that shit is boring after the umpteenth repetition of it. Also books like this have too much of the Tiger Beat fanzine approach to things for my liking. Plus there's a reason Ronnie Hawkins never got popular beyond a certain point. Still I'll probably finish the book just to read about subsequent events because the music of the group was pretty unique for the times.

Posted by: Captain Hate at April 29, 2012 06:42 PM (g8py2)

203 Obama is a stuttering clusterf*ck of a miserable failure.

Posted by: steevy at April 29, 2012 07:19 PM (7W3wI)

204 I saw that one poster is reading Viking raider novels-- i urge you guys to read "The Longships" by Bengtssen-- one of the best novels i've read

Posted by: tomc at April 30, 2012 01:50 PM (avEuh)

205 http://tinyurl.com/d8zp6am

Wifey has been reading "Etiquette" by Emily Post, 1937

So I am getting some etiquette lessons. Don't expect it to rub off here.

Posted by: sTevo at April 30, 2012 06:48 PM (VMcEw)

206 Wow this is soo helpful I have been trying to figure this out on my own for a long time now. Hopefully making this change will help encourage discussion on my blog.

Posted by: Kristin Cashore Bitterblue iBooks at May 03, 2012 08:58 PM (dgVis)

207 Took me time to read all the comments, but I really enjoyed the article. It proved to be Very helpful to me and I am sure to all the commenters here! Itís always nice when you can not only be informed, but also entertained!

Posted by: Born of Silence ePub at May 03, 2012 09:34 PM (SqHXv)






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