Sunday Book Thread: Children's Books

I can remember the first book I ever read very clearly: Virginia Lee Burton's Mike Mulligan and His Steam-Shovel. My mother had read it to me hundreds of times before I was able to read it myself, but it was the endless love of that book that motivated me to learn to read it myself.

Another one of my favorites was H. A. Rey's Curious George books. My first brush with the school authorities came in Kindergarten, where I snuck away from craft-time to read the adventures of Curious George. (Who wants to finger-paint when you can read about a curious chimp and a man in a yellow hat?) Mrs. Miller, my teacher, took note of this incident and bought me my own copy of the book out of her own pocket.

But of all the kid's books I can remember reading, one stands out: Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows. It was this book more than any other that lives on in my memory: hesitant but eager-to-please Mole; Ratty who lives by the river and takes Mole for a ride in his boat; friendly old Badger who takes Mole and Ratty into his home on a cold winter day; and my hero the madcap Mister Toad of Toad Hall. Even as a kid I knew that this was literature of a very high order. I never could get very enthused about Winnie the Pooh after reading The Wind in the Willows.

Later, when I was older, I came across Richard Adams' Watership Down, and felt that it made an interesting companion-piece of Grahame's earlier work. The Wind in the Willows was about kindness, and friendship, and sticking with your friends; Watership Down taught the older child deeper truths about anger, and pain, and fear, and even death.

Posted by: Monty at 09:00 AM



Comments

1
I miss Danny Dunn.

Posted by: geoff at May 30, 2010 09:06 AM (Mzo8t)

2 I stole my dad's Playboys for the articles.

Posted by: Ed Anger at May 30, 2010 09:08 AM (7+pP9)

3 Are You My Mother. We had all the Dr Seuss books.

Posted by: sTevo at May 30, 2010 09:08 AM (zIUsq)

4
I never could get very enthused about Winnie the Pooh after reading The Wind in the Willows.

Winnie the Pooh was better reading as an adult than as a child. The dry humor and sly mockery of adult foibles and attitudes makes for much entertainment.

Posted by: geoff at May 30, 2010 09:10 AM (Mzo8t)

5 Ah the Sunday book thread. I don't remember the first book I ever read. One that stands out early was an illustrated picture book that animals and large trees in a forest.

I do remember later on Grimm's and Anderson's Fairy Tales along with Wind in The Willows.

Posted by: Vic at May 30, 2010 09:15 AM (6taRI)

6 Another book I loved as a kid: Mr. Yowder and the Giant Bull Snake. My mom bought me that one at a garage sale, and I read it completely to pieces. I think it's out of print now, which is too bad -- it's a great book.

Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 09:16 AM (O3eFQ)

7
You remember The Five Chinese Brothers? I loved that story in 1st Grade.

Another victim of the racism mafia.

Posted by: geoff at May 30, 2010 09:19 AM (Mzo8t)

8 We're talking vintage, baby. Mrs. Pigglewiggle's Magic showed how the childless widow of a sea captain could whip the brats in your neighborhood into shape with her inexplicable cures, like black smoke coming out of a kid's mouth if he/she told a lie. It was esp. effective at the dinner table, back when families ate in the dining room every night.
The Happy Hollisters were sort of a forerunner to the Brady Bunch. This serieswas a window into abig family who often traveled and gave you a voyeuristic look into their neuroses, well, whatever kind they could've had in the early '60s or beyond.
So, no, I wasn't reading hardcore classics, but I was loving reading. I've still got a beat-up copy of a Scholastic Book's Pigglewiggle that's in pieces, butas an aspiring moron,it provided schadenfreude at an early age.

Posted by: RushBabe at May 30, 2010 09:22 AM (W8m8i)

9 The one I remember most from Elementary School was Island of the Blue Dolphin. Have never read it since, but it always stuck with me.

Posted by: Original Mikey at May 30, 2010 09:26 AM (Av4L9)

10 OK. I remember a book from my childhood that I've never been able to find again. It was, I think, called Magnificat and it was about a stray kitten named Nimrod who was taken in by a bishop. The title came from the fact that the cat liked to sit in the pews and listen to the choir practice "The Magnificat" because he thought it was about him. The climax of the story was when the cat found some guys trying to blow up the church. He foiled the plot by biting the blasting cap, a heroic act of self-sacrifice in which he dies. So the story opens as St. Peter gets words that a "maximal saint" is on his way up to the Pearly Gates. St. Peter's challenge, to figure out what to do with a kitten that's a maximal saint, is the narrative framework of the book.

Now if someone knows where to find a copy of this book, or for that matter has ever heard of it before, I'd love to know about it.


Posted by: Popcorn at May 30, 2010 09:28 AM (OOehk)

11 My 3 year old likes the Mercer Mayer "Little Critter" books. They also have some humor in them that makes them fun enough for a parent to read several times without wanting to commit seppuku.

Posted by: Quilly Mammoth at May 30, 2010 09:29 AM (u6RyS)

12 Popcorn:

Is this the book you mean? If so, Abebooks is a good, reputable reseller. (Leo the Magnificat by Ann M. Martin.)

Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 09:31 AM (O3eFQ)

13 I always loved the book series The Three Investigators by Robert Arthur as a kid. I couldn't put those books down.

Posted by: CDR M at May 30, 2010 09:32 AM (5I8G0)

14 I'd like to put in some kind words for Walter R. Brooks's Freddy the Pig series, about the adventures of some clever (and very human) animals. My favorites would be Freddy the Detective and Freddy and the Ignormus. I loved them as a grade schooler, I love them now, and my daughter delighted in them just a few years ago.

And yes, #1, the Danny Dunns were nifty. I'm kind of surprised that no one brought up Madeleine L'Engle (A Wrinkle In Time) in the first few posts. Fine books.

Posted by: Prof. Mondo at May 30, 2010 09:33 AM (wcO7M)

15 Ender's Game will always be one of my favs.

Posted by: elspeth at May 30, 2010 09:33 AM (AOIJi)

16

I'd like to put in some kind words for Walter R. Brooks's Freddy the Pig series, about the adventures of some clever (and very human) animals.

Oh yes. I've been buying reprints and forcing my kids to read them.

Posted by: geoff at May 30, 2010 09:35 AM (Mzo8t)

17 CDR -- they've reissued the 3 Investigators series (although they've replaced Hitchcock with a generic film mogul -- tempus fugit.) I loved those as well, and saw myself as the Jupiter Jones of my circle of friends.

Posted by: Prof. Mondo at May 30, 2010 09:36 AM (wcO7M)

18 For me, it was all about Madeline L'Engle's "A Wrinkle in Time". Loved that book. Was obsessed with it. I think we read it in 4th grade. I really disliked "A Wind in the Willows" which we also read in 4th grade. Maybe I just didn't get it, but I was tired of the characters. I also loved Edith Hamilton's "Mythology".

Posted by: Sassypants at May 30, 2010 09:36 AM (3/+VA)

19 I remember we had a whole set Called "The Happy Hollisters".It was about a family with several kids who had different adventures.

Posted by: TC at May 30, 2010 09:37 AM (4XzsU)

20 The Little House series. Charlotte's Web and every other E. B. White book ever written.

Posted by: Just Another Cat at May 30, 2010 09:41 AM (3LpXP)

21
Colorado voters! If you can vote in the 7th CD primary - help support and vote for Ryan Frazier ..... NOT Lang Sias.

Lang Sias, who has switched his party affiliation from democrat to republican, has given campaign donations to Mark Udall (D-CO-huge lefty)

I don't trust Sias.



Posted by: Lemon Kitten at May 30, 2010 09:41 AM (0fzsA)

22 The first particular book I remember reading is The Boxcar Children. That was years before someone made it into a series, which, I'm sure ruined it. Even at that age, I loved survivor stories.

Posted by: katya at May 30, 2010 09:43 AM (R176e)

23 I very vaguely remember a kids series about a family of tiny people who lived in the walls of a regular house. Can't remember the title..."The Littles" or something?
Seems kind of creepy now that I think about it. Anyway, I liked it.

Posted by: Lincolntf at May 30, 2010 09:43 AM (7EDH5)

24 This isn't funny Monty...YOU KNOW I CAN'T READ!!!

<sobs>

Posted by: Cousin Floyd at May 30, 2010 09:44 AM (e9JZd)

25 Go Dog Go by P. D. Eastman is about the first book I can remember reading.

One of my aunts got me one of the Happy Hollisters books, and I ended up reading all the ones in the library. They were mysteries, and that eventually got me into reading more of the books in the mystery section as I got older. Some of them were historical mysteries, which got me into reading the history books as well. It was possible back then to actually find history books in which the United States was not the focus of all evil in the world. That meant that my sojourn through the ranks of the Left was attenuated because I was better informed than the twerps who were attempting to indoctrinate me.

Around the time I was 10-11, I ran across I Robot, and ol' Isaac got me into the whole SF scene big-time.

Posted by: Gen. Sir Harry Flashman, VC at May 30, 2010 09:44 AM (o27BM)

26
Queers for Palestine.



Posted by: Lemon Kitten at May 30, 2010 09:45 AM (0fzsA)

27 Grimm's Fairy Tales, and not the prettified and bowdlerized ones either. Daddy had gotten a set of the original versions from the Heritage Book Club, and, oh my goodness, are they different from the Disneyfied versions children are generally exposed to. In "Cinderella," for example, when it's time for the wicked stepsisters to try on the glass slipper, one cuts off her big toe and the other slices off her heel. As each in turn is riding away with the prince, doves come along and sing a little rhyme about how there's blood on the shoe so she's not the right bride at all. Those stories were weird and bloody and I still love them. We did have more normal reading material around, Dr. Suess and I suddenly remember P. D. Eastman and something called "Go, Dog, Go" and I remember reading the Mrs. Pigglewiggle books to my little sister, but for me it was the very grim fairy tales.

Posted by: Tonestaple at May 30, 2010 09:46 AM (jflkR)

28 This isn't funny Monty...YOU KNOW I CAN'T READ!!!

You're on thin ice, Floyd. Thin frigging ice.

Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 09:49 AM (4Pleu)

29 "Winnie the Pooh was better reading as an adult than as a child. The dry humor and sly mockery of adult foibles and attitudes makes for much entertainment."

Perhaps, but "Wind in the Willows" was the basis for "Mr. Toad's Wild Ride" -- the only Disney park ride that involves going through Hell. The Winnie the Pooh replacement is a poor substitute, existing solely because Pooh merchandise sells better.

Posted by: Rob Crawford at May 30, 2010 09:51 AM (0onAO)

30 Prof Mondo, thanks for the update. I think I'm going to get a bunch of these books for my kids. Heck, I may go back and reread them! Loved them as a kid.

Posted by: CDR M at May 30, 2010 09:51 AM (5I8G0)

31 Treasure Island

Posted by: Beto at May 30, 2010 09:53 AM (H+LJc)

32 The first book I read myself was The Happy Little Whale, about a whale who faced whale hunters before being captured and taken to a Sea World-like park.

My favorite book was the first of the Noddy series about a wooden boy toy. This series was recently made into an achingly PC cartoon show, but the original book was highly racist, with pickaninny characters called Wogs. The principal storyline was that Noddy and his kind shouldn't live with the other kinds.

So, there we have it. Sex, bondage and racism from a very early age. No wonder I hang out at this site.

Posted by: pep at May 30, 2010 09:55 AM (0K3p3)

33 #30 That's a testament to our marketing systems,
Pooh sells best

Posted by: Beto at May 30, 2010 09:55 AM (H+LJc)

34 Little Toot by Hardie Gramatky and The Little Engine That Could were some early fav's as well.

Posted by: CDR M at May 30, 2010 09:56 AM (5I8G0)

35 The first particular book I remember reading is The Boxcar Children. That was years before someone made it into a series, which, I'm sure ruined it. Even at that age, I loved survivor stories.
Posted by: katya at May 30, 2010 09:43 AM (R176e)
I was just going to post the same thing, sure that nobody would mention the Boxcar Children. That one really stayed with me. Same with A Wrinkle In Time.

Posted by: exceller at May 30, 2010 09:56 AM (Z7Znk)

36 My favorite book as a child was 'Corduroy' I had the bear to go with the book.

As I got older it became Lord of the Rings, Red Badge of Courage, and Sherlock Holmes. Couldn't get enough of the great detective.

Posted by: instinct at May 30, 2010 09:58 AM (TIbRS)

37 25
This isn't funny Monty...YOU KNOW I CAN'T READ!!!

<sobs>


Posted by: Cousin Floyd at May 30, 2010 09:44 AM (e9JZd)
Can't read but can type?? That's an amazing talent!

Posted by: CDR M at May 30, 2010 09:58 AM (5I8G0)

38 Dij'ever put the skyscraper excavation page of Mike Mulligan up against a picture of the Manitowoc Octo at the ground zero hole? It's Bucyruseerie.

Posted by: comatus at May 30, 2010 09:58 AM (YN/Le)

39 I just want to say that although, apparently, I learned to read, I don't recall ever being read to by my parents; not saying they didn't; only that I don't remember. Also, while I remember books of youth, I remember the pictures, not the words. Also, it wasn't until very recently that I started to enjoy reading, and almost no fiction.

What is wrong with me?

Posted by: parisparamuss at May 30, 2010 09:58 AM (94AYw)

40 I grew up near naval airstations for most of my childhood. I was fascinated by aviation (still) and I could be found in the library section 630ish checking out the biggest books with pictures of military aircraft.

Posted by: Tommy Gunnar at May 30, 2010 10:00 AM (rQTdM)

41 Lion at Large.

Posted by: little feat at May 30, 2010 10:03 AM (6sKtn)

42 Can't read but can type?? That's an amazing talent!
Posted by: CDR M at May 30, 2010 09:58 AM (5I8G0)


The Daily Kos has loads of people like that. They can't think, either.

Posted by: Gen. Sir Harry Flashman, VC at May 30, 2010 10:04 AM (o27BM)

43 I must have Cousin Floyd on my show, America's Got Talent!

Posted by: David Hasselhoff at May 30, 2010 10:07 AM (5I8G0)

44 #24

Was it The Borrowers?

Posted by: Quilly Mammoth at May 30, 2010 10:07 AM (7FMLj)

45 Scuppers the Sailor Dog

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 10:08 AM (1fanL)

46 I very vaguely remember a kids series about a family of tiny people who lived in the walls of a regular house. Can't remember the title..."The Littles" or something?
That was The Borrowers. My mom used to read me fairy tales when I was very small to try and get me to fall asleep for naps. If she fell asleep before she was finished, I would wakeherup.
When I was in firstor second grade, wehad this hot, British student teacher (Miss Carlson) who wore low-cut outfits that read us Charlotte's Web and Charlie and The Chocolate Factory. There was something magical about hearing those books read aloud in an English accent. (Plus the boys were absolutely captivated by her cleavage).
I've always loved to read. Some of my favorite childhood books:Little Women,Laura Ingalls books,Encyclopedia Brown books, The Three Investigators, The Great Brain books, The Bobbsey Twins, Harriet The Spy, Trixie Belden books, Ann of Green Gables books etc. My mom and I read Agatha Christie books when I was in middle school. (I always liked a good mystery).Two of the best books I read in 7th grade were To Kill A Mockingbird and Animal Farm (both given to me by my English teacher). Now I'm reading mostly non-fiction.

Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 10:14 AM (CfmlF)

47 Ender's Game
will always be one of my favs.

Posted by: elspeth at May 30, 2010 09:33 AM (AOIJi)
I hope you read 'em all then. Bonus: Orson Scott Card is an outspoken conservative.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 10:14 AM (1fanL)

48 Oh, and for the record, 5 Chinese Brothers was racist--the 5 brothers were mistaken for one guy, reinforcing that stereotype that all Asians look alike--LOL!

Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 10:15 AM (CfmlF)

49 Oh and Frog and Toad were Teh Awesome! (Also, Amelia Bedelia and the Madeline books were good).

Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 10:16 AM (CfmlF)

50 Harriet The Spy

I liked this one too. And I'm very sorry that Fire-Can't-Melt-Steel was in the movie. But in retrospect, I don't think it's a kids' book. I mean, Harriet was batshit crazy.

The Great Brain books were awesome.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 10:17 AM (1fanL)

51 45

Nope, but that's what I found when I first "Googled" the keywords. (The Borrowers is another good one.)

It's a series by John Peterson called "The Littles" that began in 1967. Oh, and the mini-people have tails and rodent-like ears. I read the wiki, and apparently this came after the Borrowers. There's been a cartoon series, a new author for the brand, etc. but I think the last real one was written in the '90s. Pretty good run.

Posted by: Lincolntf at May 30, 2010 10:18 AM (7EDH5)

52 This is off this topic, but in repsonse to your question way back when.

I applaud fellow morons and moronettes' reading list.
I am not as ambitious to tackle such weighty issues. Currently I am reading two books each on "how to compost" and "home gardening, hydroponic system", and probably will start experimenting something small scale each.

Posted by: always right at May 30, 2010 10:19 AM (8/wkb)

53 I don't recall ever being read to by my parents


What is wrong with me?

Posted by: parisparamuss at May 30, 2010 09:58 AM (94AYw)
Whatever is wrong with you, your parents hated you for it.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 10:19 AM (1fanL)

54 I probably date myself, but I was into the Penrod books as a kid. Maybe it's because my parents got 'em cheap at a garage sale.

Never could get into the Hardy Boys thing...just seemed too ghey. I did read the entire "You Are There" history series from the school library, though.

Posted by: Wodeshed at May 30, 2010 10:19 AM (MFbfZ)

55 mouse and the motorcycle.

Posted by: trailortrash at May 30, 2010 10:20 AM (5JiB+)

56 When the Hatettes were wee tykes, I used to read to them every night from Italo Calvino's collection of "Italian Folk Tales for Children". The book was huge (over 700 pages) and a lot of the tales were variations on the same theme (the guineas really admire craftiness in these) but the kids looked forward to it and almost30 years later talk about it to their buds.
On books they read on their own, they wore the cover off of a large collection of Mother Goose poems, 2 copies of it. Curious George and Where the Wild Things Are were frequently looked at. Also regarding kids movies: The Never Ending Story was outstanding because it accentuates how reading and imagination are such powerful things.

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 10:20 AM (G9PIC)

57 "home gardening, hydroponic system"

Posted by: always right at May 30, 2010 10:19 AM (8/wkb)
Need any help, holler. I almost crapped my pants rewiring from the main box.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 10:20 AM (1fanL)

58 Twenty and Ten also known as The Secret Cave by Claire Huchet Bishop was a fictional story based on true about elementary school children in France who hid Jewish children from the Nazis. I read this book in third grade, and it was absolutely mesmerizing--plus it sparked an interest in WWII and The Holocaust. Here's a link to Amazon:
http://tinyurl.com/24qmwp9

Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 10:21 AM (CfmlF)

59 Rushbabe-I LOVED Mrs. Pigglewiggle books. I loved how she whipped those awful kids into shape, but loved them the whole time. I also appreciated that the reformed kids brought the unreformed to her to get them straightened out. A time when kids aspired to be good.

I loved Ursula LeGuin's Baba Yaga stories. She took the old Russian folk tale, and wove them into new stories. Strangely, she made Baba Yaga into a positive character (my Russian grandmother told us Baba Yaga stories, but they were more like the original Grimm's fairy tales-the old hag was rather mean, and had taste for children.)

The Three Musketeers was my favorite book when I was young. I read Walter Farley, Alcott, Little House, etc, but I loved Dumas.

And thanks for the tip about Abebooks-I am always looking for a new way to feed my book habit.

Posted by: mokimoki at May 30, 2010 10:21 AM (IrV7s)

60 Twenty and Ten also known as The Secret Cave by
Claire Huchet Bishop was a fictional story based on true about
elementary school children in France who hid Jewish children from the
Nazis.
Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 10:21 AM (CfmlF)
Did their parents punish them for helping the Joooos?Also: I hated The Secret Garden.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 10:22 AM (1fanL)

61 The first book I ever remember checking out of the library was Stop that Ball.

I read a lot Zane Grey's work very early in life. It was a compromise between me and my parents. Children's books bored me but they didn't want me reading to mature works. Grey seemed a good compromise because how radical could something written in 1910 be after all?

I read Grey's Spirit of the Border over and over, then discovered the concept of sequels. I still remember the slight unreality that hit me when I realized the characters from Spirit were the same people in The Last Trail.
I remember discussing the story with a teacher, and telling her that Last Trail was the first book that I had ever read where the hero died. I told her my Mom joked that that must mean I had never read the Bible. Freaked her out a little as this was in the fourth grade.

Posted by: Have Blue at May 30, 2010 10:23 AM (mV+es)

62 Brains Benton Mysteries, Tom Sawyer, Huck Finn. Loved Em.

Posted by: Woolie at May 30, 2010 10:23 AM (mFK1b)

63 Oh, and the William Dolch books--quick reads on so many different topics during elementary school--greek mythology, far east stories, you name it!

Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 10:25 AM (CfmlF)

64 I also remember how wonderful is The Wind in the Willows.. There is another first-class read titled A wrinkle in Time.

Right now I'm enjoying Obama's Horrible Terrible No-Good Very Bad Year.

Posted by: dr kill at May 30, 2010 10:26 AM (w9bVp)

65 The earliest book I can remember was called Snails on Whales. Just a simple kid's rhyming book. There was also Richard Scarry, Encyclopedia Brown, The Hardy Boys, and The Bobbsey Twins.

Posted by: No One of Consequence at May 30, 2010 10:27 AM (tJBi7)

66 Wow...this thread got me thinking. Just looked it up, and it turns out that Penrod is still available.

Reminiscent of Huck Finn/Tom Sawyer. Written by Booth Tarkington, pulitzer prize winner best known as the author of The Magnificent Ambersons.

http://amzn.to/bS8Xo6

Posted by: Wodeshed at May 30, 2010 10:27 AM (MFbfZ)

67 Did their parents punish them for helping the Joooos?

No, they were either orphans or parents had sent them for safety to the French countryside to live at a Catholic school. I liked Francess Hodgson Burnett books, even Little Lord Fauntleroy!
I remember reading Oliver Twist in 7th grade and being just immersed in it--you could feel andsmell the London grime and offal. Although a little verbose, Dickens was a friggin wordsmith. I got hooked on him.

Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 10:28 AM (CfmlF)

68 I read a lot Zane Grey's work very early in life.

I read Owen Wister's The Virginian when I was in fifth or sixth grade, and loved it. I went on a total Zane Grey and Louis L'Amour tear after that.

Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 10:28 AM (4Pleu)

69 Btw, I fucked up the title: It's just "Italian Folktales". I guess I just personalized it for the Hatettes.
O/T kind of but this is a book thread: Any Charles Stross fans out there? A non-moron recommended Accelerando and I'm loving the hell out of every goddamn page. I gave up on sci-fi a while back after immersing myself in it probably a bit too exclusively and they all started sounding the same; but this is the shizznit.

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 10:29 AM (G9PIC)

70 I remember "Watership Down" and I have read all the books you cite...is it our age that shows the classics were so important? I loved Roald Dahl especially. His books were just awesome.
So many great books, so little time!!

Posted by: DefendUSA at May 30, 2010 10:30 AM (yIwYC)

71 Has anyone else noticed that Monty brings some sophistication and erudition to the blog?

I resent it.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 10:30 AM (1fanL)

72 67 Wow...this thread got me thinking. Just looked it up, and it turns out that Penrod is still available.

Is this the story that includes the boys trying to turn a horse hair in a bottle into a snake?

Posted by: dr kill at May 30, 2010 10:30 AM (w9bVp)

73 Any Charles Stross fans out there?

Word up from this Moron. Stross is one of the best writers working, I think.

Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 10:31 AM (4Pleu)

74 The Oz books were incredible.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 10:31 AM (1fanL)

75 I remember Ten and Twenty-our church library had that and a book on Russian Jews taken to Siberia-The Endless Steppes, I believe. I loved both of those. The library also had a series of books on the dinosaur digs in the Gobi Desert. I loved those as well.

The Borrowers-I read those to my kids when they were little, as well as Mrs. Pigglewiggle. They didn't seem to enjoy them as much, but they both loved Orson Scott Card and Michael Crichton. (late elementary /middle school period.) As high schoolers, they read Lewis Carroll, J.M. Barrie and Terry Pratchett.

Posted by: mokimoki at May 30, 2010 10:32 AM (IrV7s)

76 The Hollisters for me, too. They came every month, I believe, and they left quite an impression on this young boy. Probably would be forbidden nowadays. If I recall correctly, they were an close-knit, inventive, and independent family, with the kids solving mysteries.

Posted by: t-bird at May 30, 2010 10:35 AM (FcR7P)

77 Nancy Drew series, loved them, as a youngster.
Doing my best to raise a reader. I read to the Wee One, everyday. At 4 yrs, she's pretty good at listening, and is beginning to read, too. We do the newspaper together on Thursday-Sunday, and I swear, she rolled her eyes when Ibegan delving into Conservative Victory, apparently, the child is not a Hannity fan.

Posted by: pitchforksandpowder at May 30, 2010 10:36 AM (oCgvh)

78 Word up from this Moron. Stross is one of the best writers working, I think.
Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 10:31 AM (4Pleu)
I find myself marvelling at the insights he comes up with on extrapolating current things outward. Having the moozik industry dinosaurs taken over by the Russian mob (Mafiya) is just fucking brutally apropos. And the ex-wife from hell working for the IRS to try and drain every goddamn penny from productive youth to keep the welfare state on crutches. And when Manfred Macx gets mugged and his techno-link glasses removed and turns into a feeble codger at 30 until he gets them back. Very effectively thought provoking without hitting you over the fucking head with the dogma hammer.

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 10:40 AM (G9PIC)

79 The first books I read? The Dick and Jane series.

Posted by: mrp at May 30, 2010 10:41 AM (HjPtV)

80 I f you can read Dulce Domum and The Piper at the Gates of Dawn from WITW without tearing up or getting a chill up your spine then you're a fossilised curmudgeon.

Posted by: David Gillies at May 30, 2010 10:43 AM (xb68W)

81 You know what really captivated me? The Book Thread that Lasted until the ONT. A Sunday tradition, like Mass, football and grilling red meat.

Posted by: Josef K. at May 30, 2010 10:44 AM (7+pP9)

82
katya, I'm like you: my first book was The Boxcar Children. A terrific read. And yes, there were several sequels, but they were pretty good.

One of my first books, too, were A Wrinkle in Time by Madeline L'Engle, which also introduced me to science-fiction.

My own kids loved fairy tales and myths. In particular, The Greek Myths and The Norse Myths by Ingrid and Edgar d'Aulaire. The books are quite good, thorough, and beautifully illustrated. They do gloss over some of the stuff (for example, Zeus wants to marry Europe and Leda and the rest of them); but they're terrific reads. They also loved the Russian fairy tales with those marvelous illustrations by Ivan Bilibin.

Posted by: Brown Line at May 30, 2010 10:44 AM (b95i6)

83 Bella Arabella was one of my faves. Beverly Clearly & all those Serendipity books like "Leo the Lop" and "Trapper", too. Loved the Sweet Pickles books. I'm still pissed my mom wouldn't buy me the Sweet Pickles Bus!

Posted by: Joanie (Oven Gloves) at May 30, 2010 10:45 AM (wd0Iq)

84 Anyone read The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay? Or The Yiddish Policeman's Union?
By Michael Chabon.
Both really good. I can't remember which, but one of them won a Pulitzer.
I'd particularly suggest Amazing Adventure..., but you really can't go wrong with either.

Posted by: Lincolntf at May 30, 2010 10:45 AM (7EDH5)

85 Misty of Chincoteague, Harriet the Spy, Bobsey Twins, Encyclopedia Brown.

Posted by: di butler, fan gurl at May 30, 2010 10:46 AM (S3xX1)

86 Hmmm- all the Dr. Seuss books. Mike Mulligan, and Katy and the Big Snow. I particularly remember a book called Sam and the Firefly. I also loved the Classics Illustrated comics. They got me intetrested in reading the orginal books. The Classics Illustrated of The Song of Hiawatha come to mind first.
Then I got interested in Sci-fi (this was the early '60's after all- the space race, etc.). I read ALL the Tom Swift Jr. books, and eagerly awaited the next one off the assembly line. There was a sort of competing series called "Rick Brant" that I read also.
One of my all-time favorites from my early reading which holds up rather well even today is "Rip Foster Rides the Gray Planet". It held up a heckuva a lot better then Asimov's "Lucky Starr". Heinlein's juvenile's hold up pretty well even though he totally had Venus wrong. Citizen of the Galaxy, and Between Planets stand out there.
Gotta stop here or I'll type a small novel.

Have a great Memorial Day, and remember those who died to give us the freedom to read as we please (among many other freedoms).

Posted by: Harry at May 30, 2010 10:48 AM (jKXyv)

87 I am so glad you chose the topic-made me remember some wonderful times in my childhood. Sadly, I have not so much as thought about 'The Wind In The Willows' for years. When I was a boy, books likes 'The Chronicles Of Narnia', 'A Wrinkle In Time', 'Aesop's Fables', 'A Light In The Attic' and 'Harold and The Purple Crayon' allowed my imagination to soar. How fondly I remember [imagination]-As adults, do you we simply forget how to do it, or feel it's not important? Either way, you brought me back to a very special place, thank you.

NRJ

Posted by: Nathan R. Jessup at May 30, 2010 10:50 AM (f9dhA)

88 I can't remember the name of one of my favorites, it was just about a kid going out into the snow and making snow angels. And of course Where the Wild Things Are.

Posted by: koopy at May 30, 2010 10:51 AM (awinc)

89 I read ALL the Tom Swift Jr. books

I used to love coming up with "Tom Swifties":

"My oxygen tank is empty!" Tom said breathlessly.
"There's room for one more," Tom admitted.

Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 10:52 AM (4Pleu)

90 'A Wrinkle In Time'

That's a great book, i probably still have it stored in the attic.

Posted by: koopy at May 30, 2010 10:53 AM (awinc)

91 Michael Chabon
He spoke at a local library (Mrs Hate wanted to see him because she's familiar with the books you mentioned) and he struck me as an extremely irritating douche. His books are admired by a lot of my buds who have widely varying tastes so I'll take it on faith that they're good.

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 10:53 AM (G9PIC)

92 "The Little Engine That Could" & oddly enough "Mike Mulligan and His Steam-Shovel" were my first two.

Still have my original copy of the Little Engine, gave it to my daughter.

Posted by: FreakyBoy at May 30, 2010 10:53 AM (uKraB)

93 When I was growing up we had a series of books in our house called I think The Book House Books. Ir had volumes 1 through 12, being age appropriate. In other words, the first volume was aimed at beginning reading, then as you get to volume 4 more like a 4th grader, etc. I have no idea when they were first published, but I read them a lot. And of course my mom would read the poems to us from the first volume before we had ourselves learned to read.
Amazing books.
Oh, and first book of course. Dick and Jane.

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 10:54 AM (6oDXl)

94 The Snowy Day
I remember crying my eyes out, in a book store, when I found that one, for my daughter. I do remember begging my older sisters and brothers to "read me that book, again". over, and over.

Posted by: pitchforksandpowder at May 30, 2010 10:56 AM (oCgvh)

95 My kids are ages 7 and 5, and we read Go Dog. Go! and Are You My Mother? to tatters. They were board books and got chewed on a bit too but I am definitely keeping those copies around for my grandkids. For younger children, I also adore Silly Sally and Bear Snores On.

My faves as a kid were The Time Quartet by L'Engle, The Great Brain series by John Fitzgerald, anything Judy Blume, Roald Dahl (that stupid James and the Giant Peach movie was awful, it could have been done so much better!), stuff like that. I remember sneaking peeks at the book Helter Skelter on my parents' bookshelf and being firmly told "Not until you're older!"

Posted by: kelh at May 30, 2010 10:58 AM (Mr+gK)

96 Anybody read theThornton-Burgess Animal Stories?

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 10:58 AM (G9PIC)

97 My sister still has all her old Frances the Badger books. I always considered them books for girls and so never read them until long after I grew up, but they are wonderful.

Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 11:00 AM (O3eFQ)

98
I have strong, but fragmented memories of a book about a sinking tugboat. I read it at a very early age and some of the images it made in my imagination stick with me to this day.

Damned if I can remember the title or author.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:00 AM (kgGdn)

99 90
I can't remember the name of one of my favorites, it was just about a
kid going out into the snow and making snow angels.96
The Snowy Day

I remember crying my eyes out, in a book store, when I found that
one, for my daughter. I do remember begging my older sisters and
brothers to "read me that book, again". over, and over.





That's it! Yeah, that was my favorite too.






That's it!

Posted by: koopy at May 30, 2010 11:00 AM (awinc)

100 I read all kinds of books as a kid, still do. What I remember best is reading to my younger brother and then to my nieces and nephews. Dr. Seuss was best for this because all his characters were so different from each other and everyone needed a different voice and accent. I loved that stuff.

Posted by: huerfano at May 30, 2010 11:03 AM (Updet)

101 Hated the Wilder Little House books because I am out here living it - 3 day blizzards with nothing to eat but crackers- yuck! I loved the Classic Illustrated comics which invited me to read the classics such as Ten Years After, Treasure Island, Tale of Two Cities, Hunchback of Notre Dame, etc.

Posted by: The Librarian at May 30, 2010 11:04 AM (jSigh)

102 DefendUSA just reminded me of the Roald Dahl books. Unfortunately, I never came into contact with them when I was a kid, but my kids liked him. Any and all morons MUST check to see if their local libraries have the audio version of The Twits. We listened to it on a car trip once and just howled. It sounds like the guys from Monty Python doing the voices and is very dark in parts.
It got to be a tradition to get that audio book for long car trips, so much so that my kids started groaning, "Not again," but my husband and I loved it and we still quote lines from it around the house.

Posted by: RushBabe at May 30, 2010 11:04 AM (W8m8i)

103 Posted by: Captain Hate

He might be a prick. Probably is, actually.
As an aside, if he's a flaming Lib he hides it pretty well. There's some hard-assed stuff in "Amazing Adventure" (to anyone who's read it, I'm thinking particularly of the wartime polar post and the subsequent death-match with the Russkie, ). Also, the Jewish legend of the Golem features prominently.

Posted by: Lincolntf at May 30, 2010 11:05 AM (7EDH5)

104
I also read several adventure books by Willard Price. They were tales about two young boys and their adventures in exoctic settings.

Amazon Adventure, African Adventure.

They were good, but predictable after a while.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:05 AM (kgGdn)

105 I've always loved to read. Some of my favorite childhood books:Little Women,Laura Ingalls books,Encyclopedia Brown books, The Three Investigators, The Great Brain books, The Bobbsey Twins, Harriet The Spy, Trixie Belden books, Ann of Green Gables books etc. My mom and I read Agatha Christie books when I was in middle school. (I always liked a good mystery).
Ah! Get out of my brain!
Okay, I don't know "The Three Investigators" but the rest of the list is extremely familiar. Oh, and how about Cherry Ames, student nurse?
I'm teaching two of my kids to read with Seuss books right now and I have such vivid memories of some of the pages of the books. I spend a lot of time looking at all the details of the pictures.

Posted by: Mama AJ at May 30, 2010 11:06 AM (XdlcF)

106 I remember reading The Wizard of Oz as a kid and realizing at the time what a scam it was that you had to wear green tinted glasses when you entered the "Emerald City". Hmmm....
And when I read Peter Pan, I remember how depressing the ending was. Wendy grows up, but Peter just never understands.

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 11:08 AM (6oDXl)

107 R.L Stine's "Goosebumps" for me as a kid. I also liked reading the Encyclopedia Brown series. My gateway between R.L Stine and Dean Koontz and Tom Clancy was Christopher Pike. Trashy teen drama stuff, but I dug the hell out of it.

One of my favorite Pike titles was "The Immortal". Interestingly, it had a plot centered around Greek Mythology where two rival goddesses, one actually being half-Fury, are sent into the mortal world under drastically difference circumstances. You have the first-person perspective of one of the these goddesses as she slowly remembers her true origins and why she's in the mortal world in the first place. Not the best literature, but an interesting plot.


Posted by: Kratos (missing from the side of Mt Olympus) at May 30, 2010 11:08 AM (9hSKh)

108 I read all of the Nancy Drew books. My mom had the entire collection as a child and I still have them. Passed them on to my daughter.

OT: Went to the rally in support of the AZ law. It was great ... a little long though. MFM is reporting a "smaller crowd than expected". I call BS on that one. Had to be at least 10,000 there. One of the highlights, besides hearing the original Sheriff Joe, was meeting Zo from PJTV. He rocks.

Posted by: incognito at May 30, 2010 11:09 AM (u6X4c)

109 There's a hole in the bottom of the sea,
there's a hole in the bottom of the sea,
but the flow is going slower,
ocean level's going lower,
there's a hole in the bottom of the sea.
B.H. Obama, taking full responsibility.

Posted by: Spartan Fan at May 30, 2010 11:12 AM (LwWtU)

110 I'm surprised nobody mentions remembering Captain Kangaroo reading to them - he read aloud and showed the pictures of Mike Mulligan and Millions of Cats and Ping the Duckling and the Five Chinese Brothers and Stone Soup. My parents bought the record albums of those stories, al Caldecott Award winners.

I loved Babar, and Put Me in the Zoo, and Sam and the Firefly. And in second grade my parents gave me a book that wasn't well-known but which I liked: Everything Happens to Stuey.

Posted by: Commander-in-Chief B.H. O'Bama at May 30, 2010 11:12 AM (W+GYq)

111 What is wrong with Paradise?

Nobody grows there.

Posted by: Kratos (missing from the side of Mt Olympus) at May 30, 2010 11:13 AM (9hSKh)

112 @88,

Rip Foster Rides the Gray Planet was also released as Assignment In Space with Rip Foster. One of my all-time favorite childhood books. I found a copy on Amazon a few months ago and it was just as fun to read as it was then.Fighting commies in vacuum with spring-loaded knives to punch through their helmets - it is Teh Awsumm.

Posted by: Empire of Jeff at May 30, 2010 11:13 AM (IDaI3)

113 My oldest loved to be read to from ages 1-6, then wasn't very interested in books for a couple years.
I was patient.
Somewhere around 8 1/2, he started reading several books at once.
I gotta get us back to the library Tuesday and get some good beginner books for the 7 yr old. She can read plenty of words, but v e r y s l o w l y. I think she has the Seuss books memorized. I have a lot of board books and then longer books, but need more stuff like Seuss for where she is right now.

Posted by: Mama AJ at May 30, 2010 11:15 AM (XdlcF)

114 100. Could it have been Toot the Tugboat?

Posted by: Commander-in-Chief B.H. O'Bama at May 30, 2010 11:15 AM (W+GYq)

115 This post is freaking me out, dude.

Childhood memories and emotions are being unearthed and brushed off.

Going to need a boob/bacon post pretty soon.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:15 AM (kgGdn)

116 MMhSS was a terrific book, and Virginia Lee Burton wrote several others which I found much later, they're also good! Katy The Big Snow
Horton Hears A Who gave me nightmares as a child
I liked Peanuts books a book called The Big Green Thing which is about a kitten (this was long before the cat-crazies started, lolz!)

Posted by: 5Cats at May 30, 2010 11:16 AM (HBEhc)

117 Oh, how could I forget the modern day classics of A Series of Unfortunate Events, by Lemony Snicket, featuring the Baudelaire orphans. An absolute scream. Each of the orphans, who stand to inherit big bucks -- if they make it to maturity -- has a special gift. Klaus, the eldest, an avid reader, is intelligent;Violet, the middlekid, isan inventor; and Sunny, the baby, has razor sharp teeth that get the kids out of scrapes. (She saved her siblings from certain death in a sawmill once!) They're constantly pursued by Count Olaf, an evil, distant relative, who stands to inherit if the kids get knocked off.
If you canget a chance to listen to the audiobooks (13 total), those read by Tim Curry will have you in stitches.

Posted by: RushBabe at May 30, 2010 11:17 AM (W8m8i)

118 Something I was thinking about reading this, especially from all the parents who try to pass down the same reading materials to their kids.
I bet we all played the same board games as kids.
The reason I say that, is I work in retail, and I see what sells at Christmas. Guess what flies off the shelves? Candyland, Chutes and Ladders, Clue, Monopoly.
Parents passing on to the next gen what they loved when they were growing up.

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 11:19 AM (6oDXl)

119 Corduroy and Richard Scarry books for me as a kid.

For my kids, Owen's Marshmallow Chick was the starter (in utero reading). Kids all recognized my voice at delivery, a nice calming bit after hours of hell.

My kids have a big book selection for whenever they want to read. If the choice is 10 books or 1 PS3 game, I'll choose the books any day.

The Little Red Hen is the finest conservative-messaged kids' book you'll find. It's the Anti-Rainbow Fish.

Posted by: Kevin in ABQ at May 30, 2010 11:19 AM (/RwSS)

120 Could it have been Toot the Tugboat?
Posted by: Commander-in-Chief B.H. O'Bama

Nope. It was an older children's book. One of my first "grown-up" books. It had pencil illustrations and fairly dense text.

I particularly remember a scene where the boat is near it's end, listing 90 degrees, and the captain has to get about on the boat by walking on the side of the hull.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:19 AM (kgGdn)

121 I'm surprised nobody mentions remembering Captain Kangaroo reading to
them....

LOL, different thread. Captain Kangaroo was the first TV program I ever saw.


Posted by: Vic at May 30, 2010 11:20 AM (6taRI)

122 My wife has one of her favorite books from childhood that I'd never heard of: Brave Baby Elephant. Baby Elephant equips himself for his first adventure alone, briefing his parents and grandparents on his preparations. Finally he sets out on his journey... to his bedroom, where he puts himself to bed for the very first time.

Posted by: Commander-in-Chief B.H. O'Bama at May 30, 2010 11:21 AM (W+GYq)

123
They should make a Captain Kangaroo movie with Bruce Willis as the Captain and Brian Dennehy as Mr. Green Jeans.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:23 AM (kgGdn)

124 My 5th grade school teacher read books to the class out loud. One of them was Roald Dahl's The BFG. Nice book. He also read The Elfstones of Shannara and The Dark is Rising.

Posted by: Kratos (missing from the side of Mt Olympus) at May 30, 2010 11:23 AM (9hSKh)

125 Anyone with a kid around the age of 10? There's a current series by Rick Riordan (I think they made a movie from one of them, The Lightning Thief) that features a kid named Percy S. Jackson. Get it? Percy S...Perseus..
Anyway he's a kid whose mother is mortal and father is Neptune. He hangs out with other "heroes" and basically does a mythology-based rather than magic-based Harry Potter thing. Tons of great mythology allusions, etc. It's a far simpler book than the Potter ones, and the kid is kind of a wise-ass slacker from NYC.
I read a couple of the books for kicks.
Very good for kids, kinda dull for adults, but worth checking out.

Posted by: Lincolntf at May 30, 2010 11:23 AM (7EDH5)

126
I hated Mr. Green Jeans.

I bet he was a kid-hating jerk off-camera.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:24 AM (kgGdn)

127 Oh, yeah, Harriet the Spy and Encyclopedia Brown, Nancy Drew and the Hardy Boys.. Then, some of Heinlein's books for (sort of) young'uns, Stranger in a Strange Land and Starship Troopers, which led me into other sci-fi and fantasy books.

Posted by: huerfano at May 30, 2010 11:24 AM (Updet)

128 #128 The Percy Jackson series has been mentioned a fair deal around here recently and has gotten good reviews.

I've never read them. They'res revisionist Greek Mythology history. Everyone knows that the Gods of Olympus are dead, except for Athena... .

Posted by: Kratos (missing from the side of Mt Olympus) at May 30, 2010 11:25 AM (9hSKh)

129 For slightly older kids, I recommend John Christopher's "Tripod" sci-fi trilogy. He's written others, too, that are good. I came across a recent inteview of him, and hooray, he sounds like a conservative.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 11:25 AM (trjej)

130 I hated Mr. Green Jeans.



I bet he was a kid-hating jerk off-camera.
I don't know about him, but I've heard bad things about Captain Kangaroo.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 11:27 AM (trjej)

131 In Cold Blood

Posted by: Frank G at May 30, 2010 11:28 AM (4X0aT)

132 129



I hated Mr. Green Jeans.





I bet he was a kid-hating jerk off-camera.

Posted by: eman

You think he was bad, you should know about his son.

Posted by: Son of Mr Greengenes at May 30, 2010 11:29 AM (zIUsq)

133 I don't know about him, but I've heard bad things about Captain Kangaroo.
Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 11:27 AM (trjej)
Ouch; what kind of things?Finding out he was a perv would not make this a good day.

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 11:30 AM (G9PIC)

134 I loved francis the badger!
and i really really loved this book called Andrew Henry's Meadow about a troublesome boy who liked to make things... when i got too old for the serendipity books i read Walter Farley's Black stallion books, a series called the Sweet Running Filly, Anything written by Will James, starting with Smokey the Cowhorse, but Sand turned out to be my favorite and is still one of my favorite books. Are you surprised i grew up to manage a studfarm?

When i got older, like 5th grade i graduated to Edgar Rice Burroughs, and read Carson Of Venus, and A Fighting Man of Mars. MY dad noticed and turned me on to hard science fiction like Niven, Pournelle, and i discovered Cyberpunk on my own when i found something by Stirling in the Kaneohe library, one summer.
My aunt just sort of left Mrs Piggle wiggle books around when i got a fever one time and i read em all before the measles were through with me... i guess i was a voracious reader as a kid. i havent scratched the surface. But my whole family was full of educators in a time when people still TAUGHT. I read the encyclopedia, a bunch of my great grammas readers from when she was a schoolgirl, and a stack of history books.
wasnt i a weird child?

Posted by: Gushka at May 30, 2010 11:30 AM (xVlYz)

135 124 I'm surprised nobody mentions remembering Captain Kangaroo reading to them....LOL, different thread. Captain Kangaroo was the first TV program I ever saw
different thread yes, but is there anyone out there that was raised without a TV? nope, not THAT old, that was my parent's choice.

Posted by: pitchforksandpowder at May 30, 2010 11:30 AM (oCgvh)

136 The Little Red Hen is the finest conservative-messaged kids' book you'll find. It's the Anti-Rainbow Fish.
Amen. My sister, a well-meaning school teacher of 20-odd years, always bought my daughters books, and one day it was Rainbow Fish. I wasn't really political and never expected a socialist lesson via such a beautiful looking book, but even I knew something wasn't right with trashing one stellar fish so all the rest could feel like they had part of his beauty to make themselves feel better. Blech.
When I boxed up the books the kids had outgrown, I debated what to do with the hardback Rainbow Fish. I decided to keep it as a lesson/discussion starteron how not to operate.

Posted by: RushBabe at May 30, 2010 11:30 AM (W8m8i)

137
I don't know about him, but I've heard bad things about Captain Kangaroo.
Posted by: OregonMuse

I learned later that the Moose dropping the ping-pong balls on the Captain was symbolism for the mailman being your real Daddy.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:31 AM (kgGdn)

138 There's a current series by Rick Riordan
I love his books for grown ups. Set in and around San Antonio. He paints an incredible picture. Big Red Tequila is the first in a series about a guy who isn't exactly a PI.

Posted by: Mama AJ at May 30, 2010 11:32 AM (XdlcF)

139

Mike Mulligan and his Steam Shovel was one of the first books I can remember my mother reading to me as a child. Also there was this one book that I can't remember the name of that had a dog named Sooner in it. If any of you mm's can help me out with that one it would be much appreciated. I loved it so much that when we got our first dog, a dachsund/beagle mix, I named her Sooner. Gus and The Firefly was another one of my favorites as a young child.

Posted by: Blazer at May 30, 2010 11:32 AM (t72+4)

140 129. I always heard the rumor that Mr. Greenjeans was a recovering dope addict.

Me, I never trusted Bunny Rabbit. Wore reading glasses but never spoke. I'd have liked to have grabbed him by the throat and screamed, "Say something, you carrot-thieving rodent!"

Posted by: stuiec at May 30, 2010 11:32 AM (W+GYq)

141 "The Wind in the Willows".
Damn! That brings back fond memories. Thanks!

Posted by: GarandFan at May 30, 2010 11:33 AM (6mwMs)

142 Why all the hate on Capatin Kangaroo and Mr. Greenjeans. They are both dead, let them rest in peace. I wouldn't believe anything "perv" about them that was said anyway.

As for Zappa being the son of Mr. Geenjeans that is an urban legend and has no basis in fact.

Posted by: Vic at May 30, 2010 11:33 AM (6taRI)

143 wasnt i a weird child?
Possibly, but so were the rest of us.

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 11:33 AM (6oDXl)

144 I hated Mr. Green Jeans.
If anyone was teh ghey, it was him. Come to think of it, the Cap'n looked rather light in the loafers, too. How about that haircut? Did he actually go out on the street with that?

Posted by: RushBabe at May 30, 2010 11:35 AM (W8m8i)

145 Mike Mulligan and His Steam shovel, and the companion piece, The Happy Man and his Dump Truck.

Posted by: AFlyingSquirrel at May 30, 2010 11:36 AM (fbL/a)

146
Mr. Greenjeans was a Soviet spy.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:37 AM (kgGdn)

147
Mr. Greenjeans was a Soviet spy.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:37 AM (kgGdn)




Chuck Barris was his arch nemesis.

Posted by: Blazer at May 30, 2010 11:38 AM (t72+4)

148 Watership Down, great book.

A friend of mine can't say Fiver without choking up...

Posted by: PJ at May 30, 2010 11:39 AM (dLFNL)

149 The Grandfather Clock was an Alien artifact recovered from Roswell in '47.

Posted by: eman at May 30, 2010 11:41 AM (kgGdn)

150 142
Blazer, Sooner is the name of the book. Patricia Calvert , author
I remember that one, as well

Posted by: pitchforksandpowder at May 30, 2010 11:43 AM (oCgvh)

151 I second The Lightning Thief - my ten year old ate them up. The first
book he ever read by himself was "Where's My Cow?" by Terry Pratchett.
(We had to tell him not to say "Buggerit" around any of our Irish
friends.)



My family's favorite read-aloud was "Three Men in a Boat" by Jerome K.
Jerome. My grandparents read it to my mother, who read it to us; I
turned all my high school friends on to it, and then read it to my own
kids, who've all read it for themselves now. It isn't a kid's book, but
the humor is plenty broad enough for all ages.



I loved "The Four Story Mistake" because it was the first of the Melendy
family stories I read, and it's still my favorite. It's about a family
with a number of children who all have adventures, but I fell in love
with the house.



I also love Strega Nona, and Tomi De Paola's 26 Fairmont Avenue series.
We did a whole unit study during Advent once when my kids were young,
using the De Paola books.



My most traumatic experience was reading the Moomintroll books at the
bookstore at the mall. I never bought any of them, because those Scandi
trolls freaked the hell out of me, but I just couldn't stay away from
them.

Posted by: VKI at May 30, 2010 11:44 AM (LZK9H)

152 The Happy Hollisters were sort of
a forerunner to the Brady Bunch. This serieswas a window into abig
family who often traveled and gave you a voyeuristic look into their
neuroses, well, whatever kind they could've had in the early '60s or
beyond.Posted by: RushBabe

RushBabe,
I had forgotten that book! Thanks for reminding me. First book I remember? The, Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe. All of the Nancy Drew series.

Posted by: mpfs at May 30, 2010 11:45 AM (QuP9W)

153 Dr. Seuss
Five Children and It
Half Magic
Magic by the Lake
Pippi Longstocking
The Boxcar Children
Chronicles of Narnia
Orphans of the Sky
The Dragon and the George
The Star Beast
Encyclopedia Brown
Nancy Drew/Trixie Belden
Peanuts
Tumbleweeds
Have Space Suit -- Will Travel (probably the book that had the most influence on me as a kid)
Classics -- Three Musketeers, Little Women (total crap, don't know why we're supposed to read that), Animal Farm, Gulliver's Travels, 1001 Arabian Nights, Aesop's Fables, etc etc...
And about a few thousand others. In my teen years it was Tolkein, Bradbury,and Zelazny's Chronicles of Amber.

Posted by: BB at May 30, 2010 11:47 AM (qF8q3)

154 Watership Down is actually political commentary. Read it again as an adult and you'll see it. Richard Adam's other book,The Girl in a Swing is awesome in a disturbing sort of way, and is taught in advanced 20th century british literature courses.

Posted by: dagny at May 30, 2010 11:50 AM (QR+ey)

155 We mentioned these last week on another book thread, but a couple of my favorites were Beautiful Joe and Champion Dog, Prince Tom. The former had some serious aspects so really wasn't great for most younger kids.

Watership Down was a great book, but I don't think of it as a children's book. Too much of a downer.

The James Herriott books were good, again more for pre-teen/teen than for children.

I also liked Misty of Chincoteague.

Yeah, I guess I liked animal books.

Oh, and of course I loved Dennis Hopper's children's books. Especially the ones about cheap sex and drugs. See how I punched down there just for PaulRevere?

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 11:50 AM (Kn9r7)

156 Daddy, Can I please read another book not by Mr. Alinsky?

Posted by: dagny at May 30, 2010 11:51 AM (QR+ey)

157 I didn't read Watership Down until after I'd seen the movie. Both are really very good.

Posted by: BB at May 30, 2010 11:52 AM (qF8q3)

158 Madeline.
I had a hat just like her and wanted to live in France. Maybe that's why I learned French.

Posted by: mpfs at May 30, 2010 11:52 AM (QuP9W)

159 Oh, forgot Old Yeller and Savage Sam.

Posted by: BB at May 30, 2010 11:53 AM (qF8q3)

160 I'm pretty sure I read a book-length version of the Bremen Town Musicians when I was in second grade; It had a plain green hardback cover, but I haven't been able to find it when I've searched in the past. Also, Harriet the Spy was one of my all-time favorites, and The Phantom Tollbooth.

When I was older I read all of the collections of Star Trek stories; I'm sure I had the (adolescent) hots for Captain Kirk!

Posted by: Janemarie at May 30, 2010 11:53 AM (oyO8v)

161 Any Catholics here remember those paperbacks on glossy paper with illustrations that recounted bible stories? My dad used to read them to us at bedtime. I think they must've been Catholic ones b/c he was pretty strict about going Roman Catholic with that sort of thing rather than generic Christian so he would've bought them at a Catholic bookstore, but I could be wrong, perhaps Protestant sects used them too.

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 11:53 AM (Kn9r7)

162
Oh, and of course I loved Dennis Hopper's children's
books. Especially the ones about cheap sex and drugs. See how I
punched down there just for PaulRevere?

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 11:50 AM (Kn9r7)



One of my favorite Hopper children's books was Where The Red Bud Grows. Man, this thread is bringing back a lot of memories.

Posted by: Blazer at May 30, 2010 11:54 AM (t72+4)

163 I loved Go Dog Go and a version of The Night Before Christmas that had neat etching type drawings in it as a very little child. The Christmas book tended to disappear around June as my parents got tired of reading it. I apparently had them memorized as my parents couldn't skip a word because I'd correct them.

When I was older I loved Bruce Coville's sci-fi and fantasy books. And then Jane Yolen's.

Heck I still go to the kids sections in book stores when I want some fun, silly, adventurous fantasy without all of the politics weighing them down. Especially when real world politics are getting me down and I really don't want to read fantasy of the same.

Posted by: nnptcgrad at May 30, 2010 11:54 AM (Opyrm)

164 Old Yeller once. I was traumatized by that book.

Posted by: mpfs at May 30, 2010 11:54 AM (QuP9W)

165 Who remembers Pop-Up books?

Posted by: mpfs at May 30, 2010 11:55 AM (QuP9W)

166 Not really story books, but still very vivid parts of my childhood were the Golden Guide series of nature books.


Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 11:55 AM (Kn9r7)

167
Who remembers Pop-Up books?

Posted by: mpfs at May 30, 2010 11:55 AM (QuP9W)



I didn't get into mean Hustler and Penthouse until my mid to late teens.

Posted by: Blazer at May 30, 2010 11:56 AM (t72+4)

168 Ouch; what kind of things?Finding out he was a perv would not make this a good day.

Well, one incident:

Some old school comedian or writer related the incident of actually going to a TV studio back in the 50s to see "The Howdy Doody Show" being taped, and the guy talked about how he wandered off set somewhere where he shouldn't have gone, and then he was accosted by Clarabelle the Clown who grabbed him roughly, yelled at him, and shoved him back into place, and he explained how the incongruity of being treated in such a hostile manner by what he had always thought of before as a happy, benign TV character has fueled macabre sense of himor.

Anyway, Clarabelle the Clown was played by Bob Keeshan, who was later Captain Kangaroo.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 11:57 AM (trjej)

169 Blazer you are a pig.

Posted by: mpfs at May 30, 2010 11:57 AM (QuP9W)

170 So many greats kids books; Some I have even enjoyed again as an adult. My favorites have included The Witch Family, The Wolves Of Willoughby Chase, Half Magic, The Witch of Blackbird Pond, Calico Captive, Pippi Longstocking,

I didn't read Narnia or Madeline l'Engle until I was an adult and loved them.

Posted by: FenelonSpoke at May 30, 2010 11:58 AM (FmMx5)

171
Watership Down is actually political commentary.

Same with The Wizard of Oz.

Explanation here.

Posted by: Ed Anger at May 30, 2010 11:58 AM (7+pP9)

172 Oh, also Sideways Stories from Wayside School, so weird and so funny.

Posted by: nnptcgrad at May 30, 2010 11:58 AM (Opyrm)

173 hop on pop and inside, outside, upside down

Posted by: phoenixgirl at May 30, 2010 12:00 PM (ucxC/)

174 Nobody remembers Harold And The Purple Crayon?

Posted by: Corona at May 30, 2010 12:01 PM (woZIc)

175 Another great memory was of my mom pulling out this old (even then) dictionary or encyclopedia-sized book called "The Big Fun Book." It was deep red fake leather on the outside with the ultra-thin dictionary pages on the inside. It contained all sorts of games, word puzzles, activities, etc. Smelled old, too. Really great.

I have it stored away somewhere and always reminds me of my mom and how great she was.

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 12:02 PM (Kn9r7)

176 Blazer is in a randy mood today!

Is Mrs. Blazer out of town or something?

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 12:03 PM (Kn9r7)

177 he was accosted by Clarabelle the Clown who grabbed him roughly, yelled at him, and shoved him back into place, and he explained how the incongruity of being treated in such a hostile manner by what he had always thought of before as a happy, benign TV character has fueled macabre sense of himor.Anyway, Clarabelle the Clown was played by Bob Keeshan, who was later Captain Kangaroo.
Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 11:57 AM (trjej)
Meh, a lot of things could've triggered an incident like that, including being lectured by the producer onnot letting dumbass kids wander off where they could get hurt and/or break shit. I'm not letting that mar the image of the Captain.

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 12:03 PM (G9PIC)

178 #166 When I was older I loved Bruce Coville's sci-fi and fantasy books. And
then Jane Yolen's.

I was turned off for a while to Bruce Coville by his "My Teacher is an Alien" Series. Personal preference, but that series was too much of a "humans-are-teh-suck, and us perfect aliens don't want them blighting our perfect universe" for me.

That being said, I really enjoyed Coville's "Book of Monsters", especially the last story - Timor and the Furnace Troll (Coville actually wrote a short preface to that story warning that it indeed "sick").

/"You're the sweetest elf I've ever known". And she was too.

Posted by: Kratos (missing from the side of Mt Olympus) at May 30, 2010 12:03 PM (9hSKh)

179 Children of Green Knowe - Boston
Wheel on the School - DeJong
Mrs. Mike - Freedman
Prisoner of Zenda - Hope
Captains Courageous - Kipling
Big Red - Kjelgaard
White Fang - London
Betsy-Tacy - Lovelace
Snow Treasure - McSwigan
Swallows and Amazons - Ransome
Black Arrow - Stevenson
Mistress Masham's Repose - T.H White
39 Steps - Buchan

so many good ones

Posted by: Thomas Hooker at May 30, 2010 12:04 PM (W/MMc)

180 Captain Kangaroo was a fine human being.

Posted by: Sideshow Bob at May 30, 2010 12:05 PM (Kn9r7)

181 My family's favorite read-aloud was "Three Men in a Boat" by Jerome K.
Jerome.

Is there any moron on here who can read this without snickering like a dirty old man?

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 12:05 PM (trjej)

182 Blazer is in a randy mood today!

Is Mrs.
Blazer out of town or something?


Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 12:03 PM (Kn9r7)







I'm in a randy mood everyday. Plus, I'm really happy I don't have to work for the next two days

Posted by: Blazer at May 30, 2010 12:06 PM (t72+4)

183 Meh, a lot of things could've triggered an incident like that,
including being lectured by the producer onnot letting dumbass kids
wander off where they could get hurt and/or break shit.

You're probably right, but I like to think it was because he had one fuck of a hangover.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 12:07 PM (trjej)

184 157
Watership Down is actually political commentary.
Really? Adams explained that Watership Down was "only a made-up story... in no sense an allegory or parable or any kind
of political myth. I simply wrote down a story I told to my little
girls" in a 2007 BBC radio interview.

Posted by: Kratos (missing from the side of Mt Olympus) at May 30, 2010 12:07 PM (9hSKh)

185 @185

How you doin'?

Posted by: Blazer's horny neighbor at May 30, 2010 12:08 PM (Kn9r7)

186 I remember having the curious george books, and the Dr Seuss books. Green eggs and ham and cat in the hat were a few. Peanuts books were another.

Go Dog Go, now that one was a favorite of mine.

Posted by: Berserker at May 30, 2010 12:08 PM (gWHrG)

187 I stand corrected first book I remember?

The Hopper reciting Dr. Seuss to me as a child.

Posted by: mpfs at May 30, 2010 12:08 PM (QuP9W)

188 Contrast Disney's Ariel to the real little mermaid of Hans Christian Anderson. I still remember the agonizing burn she felt as hertail morphed into feet.
The dark side of Cindrellawas mentioned above. I can't remember if it was the book or TV version with Leslie Ann Warren that still makes me rememberthe doves'chant of "coo-ca-ree-coo, coo-ca-ree-coo, there's blood on the shoe."
My older sister and I had warped senses of humor and thought that was a scream and used to rattle it off to each other all the time, eliciting paroxysms of laughter at the weirdest times.

Posted by: RushBabe at May 30, 2010 12:09 PM (W8m8i)

189 Anybody mention Pat the Bunny?

That book always makes me smile.

Another smile-inducer: Velveteen Rabbit.

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 12:10 PM (Kn9r7)

190 Where The Red Fern Grows. Tears, tears, tears.

Posted by: di butler, fan gurl at May 30, 2010 12:11 PM (S3xX1)

191
Ah, yes, children's books!

I remember "Kaless and the Dilithium Miners" well.

A Warrior's book!

Posted by: Michelle Obama at May 30, 2010 12:11 PM (kgGdn)

192
All of these childrens books you guys are mentioning are part of the
fifth column communist conspiracy and have subliminal references to
rampant drug use and violent sex !

Posted by: Mr. Paul Reubens Revere at May 30, 2010 12:11 PM (t72+4)

193 I remember lots of Golden Books, especially Little Toot or The Engine That Could
Books For Boys Bloghttp://booksandboys.blogspot.com

Posted by: max Elliot Anderson at May 30, 2010 12:11 PM (GkYyh)

194 The dark side of Cindrellawas mentioned above. I can't remember if it
was the book or TV version with Leslie Ann Warren that still makes me
rememberthe doves'chant of "coo-ca-ree-coo, coo-ca-ree-coo, there's blood on the shoe."

I think the original version of Cinderella, with the hacked off toe and heel, would make excellent fodder for a Tim Burton movie.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 12:11 PM (trjej)

195 Anybody remember those "Choose Your Own Adventure" stories?

Neat gimmick at first, but those books quickly became lame. It least they got me to use my imagination to make my own choices in those books...hehe.

Posted by: Kratos (missing from the side of Mt Olympus) at May 30, 2010 12:12 PM (9hSKh)

196 195 All of these childrens books you guys are mentioning are part of the fifth column communist conspiracy and have subliminal references to rampant drug use and violent sex !
and a good time was had, by all, Mr Herman.

Posted by: pitchforksandpowder at May 30, 2010 12:14 PM (oCgvh)

197 Anybody remember those "Choose Your Own Adventure" stories?
Yeh, Kratos, I liked them and got them for my kids, too. My son definitely loved the idea of them.

Posted by: Mama AJ at May 30, 2010 12:17 PM (XdlcF)

198 Say goodnight, Gracie.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 12:17 PM (trjej)

199 my Mom used to read stuff like the "Littles" and "Charolette's Web" (and Bible stories) to my brothers,sister and me, but the first book I ever read on my own was a book of greek mythology for kids, I wore that book out until I found a book about the Founding Fathers and the Revolution, later on Idiscovered the classic sci-fi writers like Asimov, Bradbury and Anderson.
my Dad thought I was weird because I read so many books as a kid, but my Mom encouraged it, so it all worked out.

Posted by: George Soros at May 30, 2010 12:19 PM (yCH89)

200 arrrghh, sock puppet...

Posted by: George Soros at May 30, 2010 12:19 PM (yCH89)

201 did it again!

Posted by: shoey at May 30, 2010 12:20 PM (yCH89)

202 Some old school comedian or writer related the incident of actually going to a TV studio back in the 50s to see "The Howdy Doody Show" being taped, and the guy talked about how he wandered off set somewhere where he shouldn't have gone, and then he was accosted by Clarabelle the Clown who grabbed him roughly, yelled at him, and shoved him back into place, and he explained how the incongruity of being treated in such a hostile manner by what he had always thought of before as a happy, benign TV character has fueled macabre sense of himor.Anyway, Clarabelle the Clown was played by Bob Keeshan, who was later Captain Kangaroo.
Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 11:57 AM
Hmmm....mycousin was in the Peanut Gallery many times, they lived close to the studio and her motherknew people who worked for NBC. She said that Bob Keeshan was very gentle and kind, but also very fussy about having everything just so...especially his make-up. Keeshan left the show in 1952 so the Clarablle you're referring to probably wasn't him. I know that Lew Anderson took over a couple of years later but I don't know who played him for those few years in between.

Posted by: Deanna at May 30, 2010 12:20 PM (hj1MN)

203 Anybody remember those "Choose Your Own Adventure"
stories?

Posted by: Kratos (missing from the side of Mt Olympus) at May 30, 2010
12:12 PM (9hSKh)
The gheyest, lamest gimmick ever. I had 1 or 2 DD choose your own adventure books.Mr. Green Jeans - my sources tell me that he was busted with pounds of pot.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 12:21 PM (1fanL)

204 How about Caddie Woodlawn, Henry Huggins, Ramona the Pest, The Little House in the Big Woods, Pippi Longstockings, How to Eat Fried Worms, and Cheaper by the Dozen?

Posted by: di butler, fan gurl at May 30, 2010 12:25 PM (S3xX1)

205 Anyone else read the Lloyd Alexander Prydain books? I loved those and my oldest read them until they fell apart.

Posted by: Ellen Adams at May 30, 2010 12:26 PM (zY0AN)

206 134 In Cold Blood
Posted by: Frank G at May 30, 2010 11:28 AM (4X0aT)


Hah, I read that when I was 13 or 14. Scared the hell out of me. I suppose Capote was trying to drum up sympathy for the killers, but they didn't get any from me.

Posted by: huerfano at May 30, 2010 12:27 PM (Updet)

207 I suppose Capote was trying to drum up sympathy for the killers, but they didn't get any from me.
Posted by: huerfano at May 30, 2010 12:27 PM (Updet)
I read it recently and didn't think Capote, a weird fuck if ever there was one, did anything other than report it pretty straight. He certainly didn't present the murdered family as anything other than model citizens whose brutal deaths would appall anybody.

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 12:31 PM (G9PIC)

208 Das Kapital, The Anarchist's Cookbook, anything about Che.

Posted by: Barack O. at May 30, 2010 12:32 PM (MMC8r)

209 Oh yeah, The Mouse and the Motorcycle, great book.

Posted by: BB at May 30, 2010 12:35 PM (qF8q3)

210 209

Neighbors at the Cape had Helter Skelter on a bookshelf in their family room. I'd looked at it sitting there for a couple summers and never saw anyone reading it. Had no real clue what it could be about, but it had that slashy/scary type of font on the cover, so I figured I better not ask anyone or they might tell me it was "too violent/obscene/whatever for me. Finally pulled it down one summer when I was 11 or 12. Holy crap!
I actually didn't get to finish it that first summer I cracked it (we were only there for a week or so and there's lots to do), but the next summer I finished it up and became the resident expert on all things Manson (among the 11-14 year old set).

Posted by: Lincolntf at May 30, 2010 12:38 PM (7EDH5)

211 Anyone else read the Lloyd Alexander Prydain books?
Oh yeh.
Must
stay
away
from
Amazon
today.
Books my kids love: anything by Sandra Boynton. Funny stuff and enjoyable silliness and music.

Posted by: Mama AJ at May 30, 2010 12:39 PM (XdlcF)

212 First book I remember reading: Green Eggs and Ham.
Other books read to me by Captain Kangaroo include boththe aforementioned Mike Mulligan and Five Chinese Brothers, as well as Millions of Cats, Make Way for Ducklings, and Caps for Sale.
Books read to me by my pretty fourth grade teacher: Charlotte's Web and The Hundred and One Dalmatians. I had a crush that teacher, though I've since forgotten her name. She had great taste in books.
I loved the Alice books for the Tenniel illustrations. They were even funnier when I re-read them as an adult.
Two books I read on my own before puberty hit and I stopped reading for a while: A Wrinkle in Time and The Phantom Tollbooth. I haven't read Tollbooth in a while and wonder how much it holds up, but I've recently revisited Wrinkle, and I was struck by how it used Fascist and Communist imagery in a science-fiction context to critique all social conformity and secularism. It was like the script for an extended Twilight Zone episode (not surprising for a book written in 1962). Oddly enough, I was not disturbed by L'Engle putting Jesus on the same level as Shakespeare and J.S. Bach, because, quite frankly, I don't expect theological rigor from an Episcopalian.

Posted by: Peter C. at May 30, 2010 12:41 PM (EF1Iy)

213 I read it recently and didn't think Capote, a weird fuck if ever there was one, did anything other than report it pretty straight. He certainly didn't present the murdered family as anything other than model citizens whose brutal deaths would appall anybody.

Well, it was forty years ago that I read it, so my memory of it is more vague than yours. Perhaps it was the (original) movie that portrayed them as feckless losers who were doomed by their association. I did see the movie about twenty years ago.

Posted by: huerfano at May 30, 2010 12:49 PM (Updet)

214 I haven't read Tollbooth in a while and wonder how much it holds up
I loved it and got it to read to my son, but it starts off slowly and he lost interest.
I'll put in a plug for the series that starts off with Dodger and Me. We all enjoyed it.

Posted by: Mama AJ at May 30, 2010 12:51 PM (XdlcF)

215 Anybody remember those "Choose Your Own Adventure" stories?
Posted by: Kratos (missing from the side of Mt Olympus) at May 30, 2010 12:12 PM (9hSKh)
Yes I do. I read a few of them. And you should enjoy this one of them was about going back in time to the Greek Olympics. The only option I remember was standing infront of the statue of Zeus wishing to never leave and turning into a statue myself.

Posted by: buzzion, 7th Level Acolyte of The Hopper at May 30, 2010 12:57 PM (oVQFe)

216 @211

that's funny, scary and probably true all at the same time.

Posted by: shoey at May 30, 2010 12:57 PM (yCH89)

217 I think my parent still have Goodnight Moon somewhere. I remember that book.

Posted by: buzzion, 7th Level Acolyte of The Hopper at May 30, 2010 12:58 PM (oVQFe)

218 In addition to teaching children about anger, pain, fear and death, Watership Down gave some important lessons on boredom.

Posted by: wallydog at May 30, 2010 01:00 PM (AqDEA)

219 I'll carbon-date myself and note the Tom Corbett, Space Cadet and Tom Swift Jr. books. Along with the Hardy Boys mysteries. Snips, snails and puppydog tails...

Posted by: BackwardsBoy at May 30, 2010 01:01 PM (i3AsK)

220 222
I'll carbon-date myself

I find carbon-based life forms very sexy.

Posted by: M-5438 at May 30, 2010 01:05 PM (Kn9r7)

221 I loved the Five Chinese Brothers and actually found a copy to give to my grandson. It's nonsense to suggest it is racist because they five brothers were mistaken for one another. Sheesh!

Other goodies include: The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins, The Three Billy Goats Gruff, Grimms - Wow, the Juniper Tree is especially grotesque. The Boxcar Children, The Bobbsey Twins, The 500 Dresses, There was a book of Random House classics that were wonderful reading. I also enjoyed reading stories about historial figures that were in the Childcraft series by World Book encylclodedia.

Posted by: Robin at May 30, 2010 01:06 PM (7kZUw)

222 Many of the titles listed here are familiar. I remember borrowing my older brothers' 'readers', which were anthologies. The Catholic schools we attended used the 'John, Jean and Judy' books. I also remember reading a series written for kids about the Presidents (there were two or three Presidents per book), as well as a companion series of biographies.

Posted by: Blue Hen at May 30, 2010 01:14 PM (1O93r)

223 I was lucky to have a dad and grandpa who loved to read-- entire works of Mark Twain, the Leatherstocking Tales (which were boring), Poe, Thoreau, Emerson, Robert Frost (my grandfather's favorite poet), London, Walt Whitman,Roland, Beowulf, King Arthur stories, all of Tolkien, the Narnia set, the Arabian Nights, the entire works of Kipling, a book of fairy tales and myths from around the world (that my dad would read instead of kid's books and make up stories of his own every night), and lots of history books of every kind imaginable -- read a lot of Tuchman as an older pre-teen, early teen, she's easily read by that age group.
And I had a great grandma and grandma that liked to read and were horse trainers: Black Beauty, everything by Walter Farley and Marguarite Henry wound up under the Christmas tree or for my birthday.
I was also taught to take very good care of my books, so they all got passed on to my kids (who have been a bit rougher on them, grr, but read them all just the same -- yay, my kids like books).

Posted by: unknown jane at May 30, 2010 01:15 PM (5/yRG)

224 Helter Skelter

Posted by: Lincolntf at May 30, 2010 12:38 PM (7EDH5)
One time in high school my girlfriend and I rented Helter Skelter and Scarface and brought them back to my house. My father was not pleased.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 01:17 PM (1fanL)

225 Perhaps it was the (original) movie that portrayed them as feckless losers who were doomed by their association. I did see the movie about twenty years ago.
Posted by: huerfano at May 30, 2010 12:49 PM (Updet)
One of the murderers was an American Indian (not doing that "native american" shit, which applies to everybody born in North andSouth America)who, it looked like, didn't have the easiest time growing up and was easily manipulated. He was more a dumbass loser than anything. The other guy was a malignant fuck about whom the only thing you could regret about killing him is that you didn't make it prolonged and painful enough.

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 01:18 PM (G9PIC)

226 Did no one read "The Little Prince" by St. Ex?

Posted by: ChrisP at May 30, 2010 01:25 PM (A1QN7)

227 I am trying to remember a book I read as kid back in the 70's.

The story was something like this: a boy comes across a whale with an injury, and puts a band-aid on it.
Then, dozens of other whales show up, and they all want band-aids too.
So, the whales all line up, and he puts a band-aid on each one. Everyone lives happily ever after.

Anyone ever heard of this book or know the title?

Posted by: Darrencardinal at May 30, 2010 01:25 PM (2e0sb)

228 We read Le Petit Prince en francais in High School.

Posted by: Wodeshed at May 30, 2010 01:30 PM (MFbfZ)

229 Dana Girls mysteries (Nancy Drew was too perfect).
Lois Lenski books
The Witch of Blackbird Pond
Dracula

Posted by: Rosley at May 30, 2010 01:31 PM (TnbCF)

230 Mom bought all 10 volumes of Collier's Junior Classics. Good times.

Posted by: nrp at May 30, 2010 01:36 PM (HjPtV)

231 #233 That be me.

Posted by: mrp at May 30, 2010 01:37 PM (HjPtV)

232 Anything by Roald Dahl.

Anything by David Macaulay (especially Motel of the Mysteries).

The Great Brain series. (Can't believe it took me so long to get into Westerns after I enjoyed these so much.)

Mark Alan Stamaty: Small in the Saddle and Who Needs Donuts? You can spend hours looking for all the little weird details. Lots of fish in cowboy hats smoking pipes (tobacco pipes, of course).

Encyclopedia Brown series.

For younger kids, Richard Scarry's books were great, especially the one with stories from all over the world (don't remember a lot about it but I have this mental image of a canine detective sneaking through a bazaar in Algiers).

Posted by: The Chap in the Deerstalker Cap at May 30, 2010 01:49 PM (JK5mm)

233 There was one book I read when I was a child that had some kid sailing in a boat and he had to hide in a sack of oranges or something like that.
Pretty vague description, I know, but does anyone know this book?

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at May 30, 2010 01:50 PM (P33XN)

234 Also, as an adult I read the collected Tales of Uncle Remus and IMHO they'd be great for kids. It's a sad irony that they're often deemed "politically incorrect" today, since Uncle Remus is one of the most likable characters in literature (and though he's a kind man, he doesn't brook any foolishness).

Posted by: The Chap in the Deerstalker Cap at May 30, 2010 01:53 PM (JK5mm)

235 My friend's Daughter loved 'Tropic of Cancer'!

Posted by: Roman Polanski at May 30, 2010 01:53 PM (lqQny)

236 The Great Brain series. (Can't believe it took me so long to get into Westerns after I enjoyed these so much.)
Yeah. The best one is where Tom and his brother Sweyn go to Catholicschool in Salt Lake City. Tomhelps catch a card shark on the train and once he gets to school he opens up aclandestine candy store that makes him and his friends a small fortune.
I haven't read that book ina couple of decades and I still remember the plot really well.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at May 30, 2010 01:54 PM (P33XN)

237 Dack, I remember that one! The Great Brain also develops the idea of beating the spread when the school gets that new-fangled "basketball" game.

Was that the one where he uses a soap impression to make a key for somewhere?

That was my favorite Great Brain book, too.

Posted by: VKI at May 30, 2010 02:01 PM (LZK9H)

238 My best friend loved Roald Dahli always privately thought that guy secretly hated kids after reading James and The Giant Peach.The things that happen to the kids in his stories were often so awful!
i did also read the uncle remus stories and from it i got my very first political idea from the quote "You can hide de fire, but what you gonna do wit de smoke?"
that stuck with me. Lies dont work.
I still have a copy of Goodnight Moon in a drawer next to my bed. Sometimes i take it out and read it when my insomnia bothers me or i feel bad. Just touching the old book makes me feel better.

I read Atlas Shrugged when i was fourteen, same summer i read Watership Down. And loved it then. read it again at eighteen and understood it better. now know it by heart.


Posted by: Gushka at May 30, 2010 02:04 PM (xVlYz)

239 Dack, I remember that one! The Great Brain also develops the idea of beating the spread when the school gets that new-fangled "basketball" game.Was that the one where he uses a soap impression to make a key for somewhere?
Yep. Tom's parents buy him a basketball and the rules to the game over Christmas break and he takes the idea back to school and convinces the priests to start a basketball league with other schools.
The key in the soap was related to the candy store. Tom needed to get into the attic of the school so he could use a rope ladder to climb down into the street to go buy candy. So he sneaks the keyout of the priest's office and makes an impression of it in a bar of soap so he can use that to whittle a key out of wood.
He also writes a letter to the pope complaining about the strictness of the school. There's also a great episode in the book where the kids go see a mentalist at a show and Tom figures out how he does the trick and then proceeds to fool his classmates by doing the same thing.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at May 30, 2010 02:12 PM (P33XN)

240 The first book I remember reading that left an impression was "Ribsy" by Beverly Cleary (best known for her tween books). It was published in the 1960's and it's about a boy and his dog and the adventures the dog has when he gets lost. I don't think it's in print anymore - if you look at her list of books, it's not there. I still have my copy and am currently reading it to my 5 year old.

I remember reading the Encyclopedia Brown series and I also had a compilation of Aesop's Fables.

By the time I was 12 and into my early teens, I was reading my mom's trash romance novels (which are actually pretty good historical fiction), Stephen King's early works and the Reader's Digest condensed books. Later on, I moved to SF/Fantasy.

Posted by: mpur in Texas (kicking Mexico's ass since 1836) at May 30, 2010 02:12 PM (iBTj9)

241 I read Atlas Shrugged when i was fourteen, same summer i read Watership Down. And loved it then. read it again at eighteen and understood it better. now know it by heart.
When I was in 8th grade, us "smart" kids had to pick one of two books to read and do a presentation. The choices were Atlas Shrugged or Leon Uris's Exodus. I chose Exodus.

Posted by: Dack Thrombosis at May 30, 2010 02:14 PM (P33XN)

242 At the risk of dating myself, I do remember learning to read in the first grade using the See Dick and Jane books.

Don't think they use those anymore.

Posted by: mpur in Texas (kicking Mexico's ass since 1836) at May 30, 2010 02:20 PM (iBTj9)

243 Do kids these days ever read Babar the Elephant books? They were written in French originally, but they've been available in translation for a long time. I love the names in those books: Babar himself, of course, but also Hatchibombitar the street-sweeper and Poutifor and the wicked Lord Rataxes the Rhinoceros. (It didn't escape me even then, though, that Babar is essentially an argument for benevolent despotism rather than democracy. Leave it to the French....)

Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 02:27 PM (O3eFQ)

244 Little House in the Big Woods
Anne of Green Gables
Bullfinch's Mythology
The 5 Little Peppers
Trixie Belden
Nancy Drew

on and on....

Posted by: Ramblingirl at May 30, 2010 02:28 PM (p88qJ)

245 Where the Red Fern Grows, is a book I remember reading in grade school. I don't really remember anything about it though.

Posted by: buzzion, 7th Level Acolyte of The Hopper at May 30, 2010 02:33 PM (oVQFe)

246 Leon Uris always bored me same with mitchner, largely leaving me cold all my life.
the shame! the shame!
I just read A Fighting Man Of Mars recently. The Gutenberg Project has it online. it was just as good as ever and suddenly i was eight again, and there really were Tharks and Zitidars on Mars, and not just dust. I used to call my blue heeler, Wally, "Woola" after John Carter's Martian watchdog. He was ugly and bugeyed and dreadfully loyal too.

Posted by: Gushka at May 30, 2010 02:39 PM (xVlYz)

247 Did no one read "The Little Prince" by St. Ex?

Posted by: ChrisP at May 30, 2010 01:25 PM (A1QN7)
No, but I have a cool picture of a snake with an elephant in him.

Posted by: FUBAR at May 30, 2010 03:08 PM (1fanL)

248 Wow, the memories. I remember reading every Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys mystery book in the series. So much so that the library in Gardendale, AL had to buy some of the older ones at mom's request.

As a teenager I read most of Tom Clancy's novels. Always loved The Hunt for Red October - still use one of the phrases from the novel, "It's scattered from hell to breakfast".

Posted by: Lone Marauder at May 30, 2010 03:10 PM (p1iaB)

249 Nurse Nancy, a Little Golden Book, is the 1st one I remember reading by myself. Think I was in kindergarten. It was cool because it had real band-aids inside the book. That got me started. The next I remember devouring were The Boxcar Children. Of course, all of the Dr. Seuss stories. I've been an avid reader ever since. Thanks, Mom, for getting Nurse Nancy for me!

Posted by: Deborah aka surfhut at May 30, 2010 03:15 PM (CncR1)

250 I'm currently writing a collection of children's stories. I'm thinking of calling it Let Me Put My Stories In Your Children.

Posted by: Empire of Jeff at May 30, 2010 03:46 PM (CToSq)

251 I'm currently writing a collection of children's stories. I'm thinking of calling it Let Me Put My Stories In Your Children.

For shame!

...though I've always wanted to see a kid's book entitled Why You Were God's Little Unexpected Miracle! (Or: Why Mommy Stopped Drinking Bushmill's)

Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 03:51 PM (4Pleu)

252 Corduroy the Bear was the first book I remember reading on my own, then as I got older, I read all of the Hardy Boy Mysteries (still have most of them, looking forward to getting my 9 year old interested in them now) and a lot of Louis L'Amor books.Plus my grandfather gave me a huge box of books that he had when he was a kid;2 series ofbookscalled Bomba the Jungle Boy, and Baseball Joe. Still have those, too.

Posted by: Dave at May 30, 2010 04:04 PM (50Nfj)

253 I remember Mike Mulligan and Curious George well. Also Babar the Elephant. Never got Winnie the Pooh - but my mom liked him.

Then, the Hardy Boys. Then, I found the War section and the Science Fiction section in the school library and it was all downhill.

Posted by: Penultimatum at May 30, 2010 04:44 PM (518Gq)

254 Many of the titles listed here are familiar. I remember borrowing my
older brothers' 'readers', which were anthologies. The Catholic schools
we attended used the 'John, Jean and Judy' books.

Yes! I grew up reading John, Jean, and Judy, which I thought was just a Catholic rip-off of Dick, Jane, and Sally.

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 30, 2010 05:23 PM (trjej)

255 And for those ofus growing up Catholic...Remember Treasure Chest Comics?

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 05:49 PM (6oDXl)

256 8

RushBabe the Happy Hollisters were great!

Posted by: whatmeworry? at May 30, 2010 05:53 PM (37puw)

257 How could I forget Phantom Tollbooth, PippiLongstockingand The Wolves of Willoughby Chase--Thanks for the reminders! Those were great books I read in elementary school! And yeah, anything by Beverly Cleary was great. Can you believe she's still alive, and still living in Portland, OR (although, she hasn't written anything in years).
I never could get through Watership Down. All my sibs loved and read it. I couldn't get past the "rabbit language" and having to refer to the definitions every time. Too tedious! I also tried to read The Hobbit as a kid, but couldn't plow through that either. It wasn't til watching The Lord of The Rings movies as an adult that I went and got The Trilogy (cause I couldn't wait for the movie sequels to come out to find out what happened). I still never did go back and read The Hobbit, though.
The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe was the best C. S. Lewis book. I had a hard time reading the rest of them, they just weren't as good.

Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 06:05 PM (CfmlF)

258 I just realized... no Indy 500 thread? Ah well, it's a kinder, gentler AoS.

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 06:05 PM (Kn9r7)

259 Hey Monty, (if you are around), thanks for a fun Sunday thread! You are Teh Best!

Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 06:06 PM (CfmlF)

260 I also tried to read The Hobbit as a kid, but couldn't plow through that
either.

I received a set of four books, LoTR plus The Hobbit, as a kid. I tried reading The Hobbit, but found it boring, so I skipped to LoTR and was hooked.

I went back to read The Hobbit. It's ok, but really inferior to LoTR. I think that makes sense because my recollection is he wrote it as a story for a child (son or niece or nephew, I can't recall), so it's much more fairy tail in flavor.

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 06:08 PM (Kn9r7)

261 Remember those awesome calendars by the brothers Hildebrandt? They were the best.

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 06:11 PM (Kn9r7)

262 I had this poster, too. Different illustrator. Also awesome.

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 06:16 PM (Kn9r7)

263 When I was growing up nothing was better than reading The Hardy Boys books. When i was 13 my grandma gave me a leatherbound copy of The Hobbit, and i really fell in love with reading, after that it was the Lord of the Rings trilogy, I still read that once a year. Dune by Frank Herbert was great.

I was a weird kid, loved reading at an early age i barely understood some of the deeper books at that age , i just knew i loved reading them

Posted by: Timewarp at May 30, 2010 06:17 PM (WiIGF)

264 Remember those awesome calendars by the brothers Hildebrandt?
I do remember them. Never really cared for the style. Just sort of lifeless.
Had Frank Frazetta done some of those, well then a whole different ball game.

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 06:21 PM (6oDXl)

265 For younger kids, Richard Scarry's books were great, especially the one with stories from all over the world (don't remember a lot about it but I have this mental image of a canine detective sneaking through a bazaar in Algiers).
Posted by: The Chap in the Deerstalker Cap at May 30, 2010 01:49 PM
That is Sniff the Detecive. My son devoured all the Scarry books and now his kids love them. Also Macaulay's How things Work and then the more advanced ones that followed by otherauthors.
My kids all loved the Value Tales series...Curie, Franklin, Confucious, Churchill, etc. They couldn't wait to get a new one each month. The grandkids read them now.

Posted by: Deanna at May 30, 2010 06:26 PM (hj1MN)

266 Here's a Frazetta.

I dunno, I like the Hildebrandts. Different strokes for different folks.

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 06:29 PM (Kn9r7)

267 Well thank ya Y-not, very cool. Hadn't seen that before.

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 06:35 PM (6oDXl)

268 Frazetta is darker, more Michelangelo-esque (to coin a term for it). I like them both, but Frazetta does better "dark" than Hildebrandt imo.

Posted by: unknown jane at May 30, 2010 06:41 PM (5/yRG)

269 First books I remember are Caps for Sale and Ping the Duck. I loved Ping the most.

Posted by: lauren at May 30, 2010 06:48 PM (MVwBA)

270 I had an unusual childhood. My father taught me how to read from the newspapers when I was four. He did the same thing with my younger sister to show it was no fluke the following year. My sister was normal and prefered being read to by an adult. I, on the other hand, became a readaholic.
I read anything I could get my hands on. My parents had a five shelf bookcase in the living room. The books included Bullfinches Mythology, Casanova's Memours, Kenneth Robert's Northwest Pssage, Celtic Songs Stories, a book with the plots of most operas, as well as a college dictionary and an encyclopedia set. I read them all.
When, as a third grader, I got my first library card, I was in Heaven. I was reading, at the same time, Freddy the Pig, Clarence Mumford's original Hoppalongbooks, the Lensman series, and Xenophon's The March of the Ten Thousand. For old times sake, I just finished re-reading The Wind in the Willows.
I would not recommend anyone making a child read books in the manner that I did but it did not seem to bother me. The liberians were quite distressed by my reading habits but, after a confrontation with my mother, left me to my own devices.
I liked the Tarzan books and Bomba the Jungle Boy. Casanova's escape from the Pombi and his work with the lottery was interesting but, for the life of me, I could not understand his "thing" with ladies's stockings.

Posted by: Longwalker at May 30, 2010 06:57 PM (1kwr2)

271 My dad used to take us to the library every Sat. a.m. We would check out an huge stack of books, and then try to get them all read by the following Saturday.

Posted by: runningrn at May 30, 2010 06:59 PM (CfmlF)

272 The first book I remember reading is Lorna Doone. After that I was addicted and have read thousands since.

Posted by: Dianne at May 30, 2010 07:05 PM (qD60T)

273 Loved Nancy Drew - we would buy them usedat Haslam's where we did not go often enough. I fear that deprivation traumatized me and that's why most of the sitting space in my living room has stacks of books on it.
When I was in 6th grade, I read "The Boston Strangler" and wrote a book report on it.Embarassed the hell out of my mother, but I still love true-crime writing to this day.

Posted by: Tonestaple at May 30, 2010 07:11 PM (jflkR)

274 Books that I HIGHLY recommend to those of you who have not already read or heard of them, are the Flashman books by George MacDonald Fraser. ABSOLUTE TREASURE!!!!

Posted by: Dianne at May 30, 2010 07:11 PM (qD60T)

275 My reading interest style was from left to right through the library we went to as a kid - once I finished the kids books there were books on the states - I read all 50 - the next block over was science. The bigger books were better since we didn't go there that often - like once a week or so.
One time my mother was staying in the car with the younger kids while the rest of us went in to grab out dose of books. This one librarian wouldn't let me check out the stack of books I had because I was supposedly too young to read them and I had too many. I had to go get my mom and make everyone wait. I think I've hated government bullcrap ever since.
Well about then we started going to a different branch. About 10 years later my mother is working at that branch and I go back to pick her up after work and I recognized that same woman working the desk. It made my mom laugh that I was still annoyed at her.
Come to think of it., I still am..

Posted by: Oldcat at May 30, 2010 07:16 PM (Jp/J9)

276 are the Flashman books by George MacDonald Fraser. ABSOLUTE TREASURE!!!!
Yes, they are. Flashman at the Charge!

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 07:31 PM (6oDXl)

277 mike mulligun! i still have that book. loved it as a kid.

Posted by: barack obama at May 30, 2010 07:46 PM (98VOn)

278 Brown Line (#83)'s daughter here. All of us kids grew up with good memories of fairy tales and myths from all around the world. The Norse and the Greek stuff was great, but they weren't the only thing; we had a book of Isaac Bashevis Singer's Jewish folktales, which overlapped well with the Russian fairy tales. And I'm grateful we kids got to read that at a young age--especially because it's become the basis for my current career.

There were also the Dorrie books--Dorrie, the little witch. Every book began the same way. "This is Dorrie. She is a witch. A little witch. Her hat is always on crooked, and her socks never match. She lives in a big house with her mother the Big Witch, Cook, and her black cat Gink." Cue hijinks, people getting turned into teacups, and flying schoolhouses.

Posted by: Tungsten Monk at May 30, 2010 07:56 PM (eoNVn)

279 I remember a great big book full of bedtime stories - my Dad would let me pick which one I wanted him to read to me each night. I almost always picked one about a dragon who had lost one of its sneakers (or something like that). When I started reading well, I had a bunch of Encyclopedia Brown and those Which-Way adventures, Choose-your-own-adventure books.

When I was in about maybe third grade, the teacher would have storytime after lunch each day. She'd turn off the lights, except for the little desk lamp, and read to us. I loved one of the books so much, but couldn't remember what it was called. Finally remembered enough details that I could do an effective search. It was "From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler" by E.L. Konigsburg. The thought of running away from home to live in a museum (dodging guards, finding somewhere to sleep, eat, and bathe) and solve a mystery just had me fascinated. I read that book to my older two several years ago and am planning to read it to my little one over the summer.

After we finish The Mouse and The Motorcycle.

Oh, and the first time I encountered A Wrinkle In Time, I had to put it down because it freaked me out so badly. My oldest girl read that and the others and loved them.

Posted by: AngelEm at May 30, 2010 08:03 PM (Aq93A)

280 Brown Line (#83)'s daughter here. All of us kids grew up with good memories of fairy tales and myths from all around the world.
Well that is just too cool. Great parent, great kid.

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 08:16 PM (6oDXl)

281 91
I read ALL the Tom Swift Jr. books





I used to love coming up with "Tom Swifties":





"My oxygen tank is empty!" Tom said breathlessly.


"There's room for one more," Tom admitted.







Posted by: Monty at May 30, 2010 10:52 AM (4Pleu)
"It's the best way to unclog the drain," Tom said succinctly.

Posted by: dead, not sleeping at May 30, 2010 08:23 PM (HSbJo)

282 I started reading with a book about angels (that's all I remember about it). When I got to grade school I monopolized my school's copy of Matt Christopher's The Kid Who Only Hit Homers. I must've read that thing a dozen times in second grade. I was also a big fan of Encyclopedia Brown and John Fitzgerald's Great Brain series. I moved on to Le Guin (couldn't get past A Wizard of Earthsea) and A Wrinkle in Time in fifth grade and then pretty much everything I could carry home from the library.

Posted by: Greg at May 30, 2010 08:31 PM (RRwb4)

283 98
Anybody read theThornton-Burgess Animal Stories?

Posted by: Captain Hate at May 30, 2010 10:58 AM (G9PIC)

Yes.. I did when I was a kid and I loved them.. They were great how they incorporated real world animal behaviors into their anamorphic presentations. The rabbit was run from the fox, the squirrel would hide from the hawk.. Stuff like that..Great books. If you can find them on Amazon or E-bay, get them.

Posted by: Dave C at May 30, 2010 08:49 PM (cTF0T)

284 I love that this place has active threads on children's books and weaponry... simultaneously.

Posted by: Y-not at May 30, 2010 09:19 PM (Kn9r7)

285 Yeah,
Tom Swift and The Death Ray.

Posted by: HH at May 30, 2010 09:25 PM (6oDXl)

286 My favorite book as a child was The Boxcar Children by Gertrude Warner. I adored that book.

Posted by: Renee Dawe at May 30, 2010 09:46 PM (EVd2M)

287 I didn't have time to read through all these, but if someone hasn't mentioned Sarah's Granny and the Groodle then someone should have, so I will. It's a great read-aloud to 4-7 year olds or so, and encourages them to read.

Posted by: JorgXMcKie at May 31, 2010 12:37 AM (290l2)

288 I remember enjoying: The Mouse and the Motorcycle series, the Bunnicula series, Witches, the Indian in the Cupboard series; Chronicles of Narnia of course; The Dragonlance Chronicles; Magic Kingdom for Sale - Sold; and too many more to remember.

Posted by: g21in45 at May 31, 2010 02:12 AM (1UCsE)

289 Hot Damn. I thought I was the only person alive who read Phantom
Tollbooth... cause the answer to every thing is NOT 42; it's 17!!! and
absolutely none of my friends knows what I'm talking about.





My parent had a stack of Classic Comicbooks a mile high, so I had fun
there.





3 Investigators, Tom Swift, Half Magic, The Egyptian Game, lots of Greek mythology, Nancy Drew,
Bobsey Twins, Trixie Beldon. One about a boy who build 4 robots who
"come to life" after getting hit by lightning - but not in a
Frankenstein kind of way. My Zoo Family - about Helen Martini (?) who
helped her husband hand raise animals at a zoo in NYC (?)





And was lucky enough to read a couple books by Enid Blyton(?) She was
very popular in English tween literature. But I loved Mystery Island,
and The Castle of Adventure, and Kiki the talking parrot who could
imitate an express train whistle.





My dad had lots of naval history and warfare books ... Was born too late
in life to be a Naval Pyrotechnic Engineer.



But my mom had a book on the shelf ... never read it - a Western of
sorts but I remember asking her what was on the cover... She said
'Lightning'. And I argued that lightning doesn't look like that. And she
says 'well, that's the way the artist drew it !' Flash forward 20 years
and I was working in Wichita, KS. Am walking home from the mall, a
storm rolls in, and for the first time in my life I watch lightning roll
across the sky like a hand with fingers from one side of the horizon to
the other!!! Grew up in Florida with only cloud to ground lightning.
I've never seen anything like this before in my life. And all at once, I
remember my mom's book and realize, duh! that was what the artist
meant.



'Please put me back in the water for I am Paddle-To-The-Sea...' The nice
librarian helped me find it when I could not remember the name, only
the plot.



And finally, thank you Grandma! who taught me to read.

Posted by: Adriane at May 31, 2010 03:53 AM (mXBw3)

290 #98Anybody read theThornton-Burgess Animal Stories?
Yes! I was wondering if anybody would remember those. Thickly, vividly illustrated -- but it was a book, and I read it. My first.
My first "novel" was a Hardy Boys."The Mystery of Cabin Island," I beieve.
My motherwas a novelist, and she would encourage me to write the authors of books I really enjoyed. Two were "Pilot Down, Presumed Dead," and "Toyon, a Dog of the North."In both cases I got return letters. Big moments in the life of a young reader.

Posted by: rrpjr at May 31, 2010 08:51 AM (gCHLP)

291 In addition to teaching children about anger, pain, fear and death, Watership Down gave some important lessons on boredom.
Posted by: wallydog at May 30, 2010 01:00 PM (AqDEA)
Excellent.

Posted by: rrpjr at May 31, 2010 09:04 AM (gCHLP)

292 @167- I've already decided that if my kids want to read Old Yeller or Where The Red Fern Grows, they will do it on their own. No shared bedtime reading of either of those books for me. I can't even think about Where The Red Fern Grows without choking up.

Posted by: kelh at May 31, 2010 09:21 AM (eK/d0)

293 @235 Mark Alan Stamaty: Small in the Saddle and Who Needs Donuts? You can
spend hours looking for all the little weird details. Lots of fish in
cowboy hats smoking pipes (tobacco pipes, of course).

Yes yes yes! I bought Who Needs Donuts three years ago, without ever having heard of it before. I just thought the story was quirky and the pictures were outstanding. I would trail off while reading it to my eldest because I would be so fascinated by the pictures.

Posted by: kelh at May 31, 2010 09:26 AM (eK/d0)

294 300!

Posted by: OregonMuse at May 31, 2010 11:12 AM (trjej)

295 My son loved Sam the Firefly.

Posted by: JEA at May 31, 2010 04:49 PM (hE6mo)

296 The Wind In The Willows was my favorite book too, along with Sherlock Holmes,the older Tom Swift books,the Danny Dunn series,Anatole the Mouse,and Young Thomas Edison, and the works of Jules Verne.
The World Book Encyclopedia was my World Wide Web.I learned a lot about the natural sciences from the Golden Book series.
I'm 59, and I still read most of these wonderful books for the pleasure they give me, plus I love the mellow paper and ink scent of an older book!

Posted by: Skip G. at May 31, 2010 07:02 PM (j22B0)

297 I was homeschooled from about 4th grade through to 10th..

My mom let me read all the Edgar Allen Poe books I wanted.. Some were a bit rough to make it through but I liked them..

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